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Entries in Hemy Neuman (5)

Thursday
Mar152012

Dunwoody Verdict: Hemy Neuman Found Guilty

Dunwoody Police Dept(DECATUR, Ga.) -- A jury has found Hemy Neuman, the defendant in the Dunwoody day care murder trial, guilty in the killing of Georgia father and entrepreneur Rusty Schneiderman.

The official verdict read by the jury's tearful forewoman was "guilty beyond a reasonable doubt but mentally ill." Neuman was also found guilty of possession of a gun during a felony murder.

Neuman was accused of gunning down Schneiderman, 36, in the parking lot outside Schneiderman's son's suburban Atlanta nursery school. Schneiderman was married to Andrea Schneiderman, who had once been Neuman's employee at GE Energy.

Prosecutors and defense lawyers alleged that Andrea Schneiderman had an affair with Neuman, 48, and played a role in her husband's death in November 2010. Schneiderman has denied having a romantic relationship with Neuman. She has not been charged with any crime but has hired two attorneys.

The jury had been deliberating since Monday, when prosecutors and the defense presented their closing arguments.

Experts for the defense testified that Neuman was legally insane. Dr. Adriana Flores, a forensic psychologist, said last week that Neuman had suffered undiagnosed and untreated bipolar disorder with psychosis since his early teens. She said Neuman experienced delusions, and had erotomania, meaning that he thought he was having an affair with Andrea Schneiderman, the wife of victim Rusty Schneiderman.

During the trial, Neuman's attorneys said that he was visited by an angel whose voice sounded like that of singer Olivia Newton-John and a demon whose voice was similar to singer Barry White's. While the demon encouraged Neuman to commit suicide, the angel told Neuman that Rusty Schneiderman's children were his and that he needed to protect them by killing Rusty Schneiderman, his attorneys said.

But state psychiatrist Pamela Crawford said she believed Neuman was faking his symptoms.

"His discussion of [the demons] was inconsistent," Crawford testified. "At one point he says, 'I know they are not real,' then later says, 'I just want the demons to go away.' He's not even consistent in the same interview."

The prosecution argued that Neuman could decipher the difference between right and wrong. "The defendant is serving up an insanity sandwich and he's been serving it up since 2010 and he wants you to eat it," District Attorney Robert James told the jury.

James called Rusty Schneiderman a good man and a good husband.

"He did not deserve this. Rusty deserved to be alive. A wife that honored him. To see his children grow up, not to be shot down in the street like a stray dog," he said.

Watch the full story on ABC's 20/20 Friday at 10 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Mar022012

Psychologist: Murder Suspect is Insane and Not Responsible for Crime

Dunwoody Police Dept(DECATUR, Ga.) -- A psychologist for the defense in the murder trial of a man who is accused of fatally shooting his then-employee's husband told a jury Thursday that she believed the defendant Hemy Neuman was insane and thus not legally responsible for the killing.

Neuman, 49, is charged with shooting and killing Rusty Sneiderman, a 36-year-old Harvard graduate and entrepreneur, in the parking lot of the Sneidermans' son's suburban Atlanta preschool on Nov. 18, 2010. He has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

In testimony at the DeKalb County Courthouse in Decatur, Ga., Adriana Flores said Neuman had suffered undiagnosed and untreated bipolar disorder with psychosis since his early teens.

Neuman had also experienced delusions, and had erotomania, meaning that thought he was having an affair with Andrea Sneiderman, the victim's wife, she added.

Flores also said Neuman had a rescue delusion in which he believed he had to save Sneiderman's children, Ian and Sophia, from their father. He told her he had been visited by a "she-demon" who told him the Sneidermans' children were his.

"He believed he was the father of the children, they were his children and were in danger," Flores told the court. "It was his duty to rescue them, to protect them by killing Rusty, then he could be with his children."

Flores testified that Sneiderman manipulated Neuman, describing the relationship as "more push and pull, I want you, I don't want you … ."

The case has drawn national attention, in part because of the prosecution and defense's tough questioning of the victim's widow, who is not on trial.

Witness testimony last week revealed Andrea Sneiderman may have been involved in an affair with Neuman – an engineer who was her boss at GE Energy, that she gave conflicting statements about when she learned of her husband's death and that she delayed in alerting police when she realized Neuman may have been the alleged killer.

Andrea Sneiderman has not been charged in connection with her husband's death, and she has denied any affair with Neuman, but has been the focus of censure in the court.

She has been barred from the courtroom for the duration of the trial for inappropriate interaction with a witness.

The prosecution has painted Neuman as a calculating killer who planned Sneiderman's shooting for months, going to gun shows, taking a gun safety course, going to target practice, renting a car for the shooting and wearing a disguise.

But his attorney, Doug Peters, said in his opening statements that Neuman believed he had been visited by an angel resembling Olivia Newton-John and a demon resembling Barry White, who told him that Sneiderman's children were his and that he needed to protect them by killing Rusty Sneiderman.

In testimony Wednesday, Neuman's younger sister, Monique Metsch, told jurors that her father had been abusive to Neuman when they were children. That rough childhood marked the start of Neuman's mental illness, she said.

Their father would kick, hit, slap and whip Neuman, she said.

Through her attorney, Neuman's estranged wife cast doubt on the claims of mental illness.

"My client did not see any signs of a mental illness, just the many signs of a man caught cheating," the attorney, Esther Panitch, told ABC News.

Another psychiatrist – who spent three hours meeting with Neuman in jail to assess his mental state – also testified Wednesday. Dr. Julie Rand Dorney told the court that Neuman showed "some possible psychosis," and that she wasn't sure whether the alleged affair was real or not.

"[Neuman] would at one point say he had sex with this woman and at later points when I asked him if he was having an affair with her, he would say, 'I don't know, I guess if she says it didn't happen, I guess it didn't happen,'" Dorney testified.

The trial is expected to conclude early next week.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Feb242012

Dunwoody Day Care Murder: Did Wife Know About Husband's Killing?

Dunwoody Police Dept(ATLANTA) -- Two witnesses in the trial of a Georgia man accused of murdering the husband of his alleged lover testified Thursday that the woman, Andrea Sneiderman, told them she knew about her husband's death earlier than she claimed in court.

Hemy Neuman, 48, is charged with shooting and killing Sneiderman's husband Rusty Sneiderman, 36, in the parking lot of the Sneidermans' son's preschool in November 2010.  Neuman, Andrea Sneiderman's former boss at GE Energy, has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

Rusty Sneiderman's father Don Sneiderman testified Thursday in an Atlanta courtroom that he received a phone call on the day of the incident from Andrea Sneiderman, his daughter-in-law, at 9:30 a.m. saying that his son had been shot.

"At 9:30, she said Rusty had been shot, she was so, so sorry and she was going to Dunwoody Prep to see what happened," Don Sneiderman said..

He confirmed to the court that he was sure his daughter-in-law had called him at 9:30 a.m. because he had spoken to Rusty Sneiderman after he dropped his son Ian off at the preschool.  That account conflicted with Andrea Sneiderman's testimony Wednesday, when she told the court that she first heard that her husband was shot when she arrived at the hospital at 11 a.m.

"I didn't know what happened to Rusty until I got to the emergency room," Sneiderman, who has denied that she had an affair with Neuman and has not been charged in connection with her husband's death, said on Wednesday.  "No one told me what happened to Rusty."

She said that she had called Don Sneiderman, but contrary to his testimony, she said she told him, "Something's happened to Rusty, I have no idea what."

Andrea Sneiderman's close friend of 10 years, Shayna Citron, also testified on Thursday that the widow told her of her husband's shooting before 11 a.m.  Citron said she was in Arizona with her husband and heading to a spa at about 8:30 a.m. when Andrea Sneiderman called her, which would have been 10:30 a.m. in Georgia.

"She was screaming to me that Rusty had been shot," Citron recalled of Sneiderman's phone call.  "She didn't know if he was dead or alive and she was on her way to the hospital and she passed the phone to her mother."

Neither the defense nor the prosecution denies that Neuman pulled the trigger and killed Sneiderman, but they tell divergent stories of what led to the killing.

The prosecution painted Neuman as a calculating killer who planned Sneiderman's shooting for months -- going to gun shows, taking a gun safety course, going to target practice, renting a car for the shooting and wearing a disguise.

Neuman's defense attorney, Doug Peters, said in his opening statements that Neuman believed he had been visited by an angel resembling Olivia Newton-John and a demon resembling Barry White, who told him that Sneiderman's children were Neuman's and that he needed to protect them by killing Rusty Sneiderman.

Neuman's defense claims he and Andrea Sneiderman were involved in a hot-and-cold affair when she worked for him at General Electric.  Sneiderman denies any affair.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Feb232012

Georgia Engineer Murder Trial: Widow Calls Her Boss 'Delusional'

Dunwoody Police Dept(ATLANTA) -- The General Electric worker whose former boss and alleged lover admits he killed her husband said on Wednesday the ex-boss was, "a self-proclaimed delusional individual" who fooled her using "masterful manipulation."

Testifying at Hemy Neuman's murder trial in Atlanta, his former employee, Andrea Sneiderman, described the former high-level GE operations manager as a "predator."

"Every time we spoke, it was like he was my best friend. Every time we had a verbal conversation, 'Oh, I understand.  I respect your marriage,'" Sneiderman said of Neuman.  "But what he liked to do was jab at my marriage.  But then, 'I respect you.  You're a good mother.'  That was his mode of operation."

Neuman, 48, is charged with shooting and killing Sneiderman's husband, Rusty Sneiderman, 36, in the parking lot of the Sneidermans' son's preschool in November 2010.

Neuman has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.  His defense claims he and Andrea Sneiderman were involved in a hot-and-cold affair when she worked for him at General Electric. Sneiderman denies any affair.

Neither the defense nor the prosecution denies that Neuman pulled the trigger and killed Sneiderman, but they tell divergent stories of what led to the killing.

Neuman's defense attorney, Doug Peters, said in his opening statements that Neuman believed he had been visited by an angel resembling Olivia Newton-John and a demon resembling Barry White, who told him that Sneiderman's children were Neuman's and that he needed to protect them by killing Rusty Sneiderman.

The prosecution painted Neuman as a calculating killer who planned Sneiderman's shooting for months -- going to gun shows, taking a gun safety course, going to target practice, renting a car for the shooting and wearing a disguise.

Sneiderman told the court that after Neuman read her a poem at dinner during a business trip, she realized that, "he had deeper feelings for me than just friends."

"None of those feelings were ever returned and I made myself completely clear where I stood," Sneiderman said. "I did nothing but try to help Hemy Neuman -- suggested he get counseling in his marriage, not move out of his home.  I would do that for any friend."

"I remember walking out of that dinner like we were best buddies," she said. "It was a masterful manipulation."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Feb212012

Dunwoody Day Care Killing: Trial Begins for Georgia Engineer Charged With Murder

Dunwoody Police Dept(ATLANTA) -- The murder trial of a Georgia engineer charged with killing his colleague and alleged lover's husband began Tuesday in Atlanta with starkly different tales of romance, betrayal and insanity in attorneys' opening statements.

Hemy Neuman, 48, was a high-level operations manager at General Electric when he shot and killed Andrea Sneiderman's husband Rusty Sneiderman, 36, in the parking lot of Sneiderman's son's preschool.

Andrea Sneiderman worked for Neuman at General Electric and they were allegedly involved in a hot-and-cold affair.

Neither the defense nor the prosecution denies that Neuman pulled the trigger and killed Rusty Sneiderman, but they tell divergent stories of what led to the killing.

Neuman pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.

Neuman's defense attorney Doug Peters said in his opening statements that Neuman believed he had been visited by an angel and demon in the forms of Olivia Newton-John and Barry White, respectively, that told him that Sneiderman's children were his and that he needed to protect them by killing her husband.

Peters said mental illness runs in Neuman's family and his troubled past could be traced back to his family being taken to Auschwitz by the Nazis, a violent father and boarding school.

Neuman eventually married and became the father of three children -- 21-year-old twins and an 18-year-old daughter.

Andrea Sneiderman worked for Neuman at GE and in May 2010, they took their first business trip together and began having conversations about their personal lives. Peters went on to describe numerous romantic business trips, hours spent on the phone and hundreds of personal text messages exchanged between the two.

The defense contends that although Andrea Sneiderman at times said she would never leave her husband, she encouraged Neuman to envision a life with her and her children. These messages and his troubled background, the defense said, were what led Neuman to hear demons and angels that commanded him to murder Rusty Sneiderman.

Andrea Sneiderman was in court and shook her head and let out sporadic sobs as Peters spoke.

"Marry me," Neuman wrote in a text message read by Peters. "You think I'm crazy and your intentions are clear. Sleep on it. I will give you, Sophia and Ian the world. Together we can make it all work. Marry me."

In an email, Andrea Sneiderman wrote to Neuman, "Desire versus reality is a world I'm trying to ignore because I have to. So sorry, not fair to you, I have other thoughts but not the time right now."

"We know what happened; this case is about why. ... How could this have ever possibly taken place?" Peters asked the jurors. "This man should not be released, he should be confined as the law provides, and held as the law provides. This man is not guilty by reason of insanity."

The prosecution told a very different story.

"It's a case of violence where a man wanted someone else's wife, so he killed her husband," DeKalb County Chief Assistant District Attorney Don Geary said in opening statements Tuesday. "He got caught."

The prosecution painted Neuman as a calculating killer who planned Sneiderman's shooting for months -- going to gun shows, taking a gun safety course, going to target practice, renting a car for the shooting and wearing a disguise.

Geary also painted a picture of Rusty Sneiderman's last morning and how unsuspecting he was as he dropped his 2-year-old son Ian at a Dunwoody day care.

"Ian enjoyed spending time with his father and spending time with his friends at day care, didn't know that shortly his loving father, his hero, would be gunned down," Geary said. "Ian didn't know that he was about to see his father for the last time. Ian didn't know that there would be gunshots and that would be the end."

"As Rusty walks to car, Hemy Neuman approaches him, walking towards him, and shoots him three times -- here, here, and here," Geary said as he demonstrated the motions. "As Rusty falls in the parking lot, dying, Hemy Neuman isn't satisfied. He walks up and at contact puts the 40 caliber on Rusty's neck and fires one last time."

Geary expressed his skepticism at the idea that Neuman, an engineer who managed more than 5,000 engineers and an $800 million budget, decided to kill a man without question after being visited by angels and demons resembling celebrities.

Geary said Neuman "doesn't come close" to meeting the requirements for legal insanity.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio