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Entries in Impersonation (4)

Thursday
Aug302012

Fla. Man Found Guilty of Impersonating Physician's Assistant

Hemera/Thinkstock(KISSIMMEE, Fla.) -- Matthew Scheidt, the Florida teen on trial for posing as a medical professional, was found guilty Thursday of impersonating a physician's assistant and practicing medicine without a license.

A jury found the 18-year-old guilty of two counts of impersonation and on two of three counts of practicing without a license.

Scheidt reportedly wept when the verdict was read. He will be sentenced Nov. 14 and faces up to 25 years in prison on the felony counts.

During the trial prosecutors said Scheidt masqueraded as a physician's assistant and played the part so well that he even wore scrubs and a stethoscope.

The teen was arrested Sept. 2, 2011 after police say he posed as a physician's assistant at Osceola Regional Medical Center in Kissimmee, Fla.

Scheidt, who was then 17, had actually been employed as a clerk at a doctor's office across the street from the hospital. He told police that when he went into the medical center to get his identification, he was given incorrect credentials.

Prosecutor Sarah Freeman told jurors Tuesday that the teen went so far in his deception as to be "Dressed in scrubs, stethoscope around his neck...he even had the terminology down."

Scheidt's attorney, Jamie Kane, insisted Scheidt was innocent, and blamed hospital administrators who gave the teen a badge meant for a physician assistant without checking his credentials.

Edith Silva, a hospital human resources employee, testified that she never verified that he was a physician assistant "because the office was very busy."

Scheidt's attorney says he never lied or never intended to deceive anyone, and that he told those who asked that he was a student, but the prosecution called numerous witnesses who contradicted that assertion.

"I walked into the room and observed Mr. Scheidt, stethoscope to a patient's chest, listening to breath sounds," said Devin Mone, an emergency room physician assistant. "And he had an IV catheter in his hand."

After his arrest, Scheidt talked openly to police about what happened, telling them that a doctor at the hospital had asked him to take over CPR on a patient.

"I started doing CPR for a minute, two minutes, while he went to get medications and came back in. That was it," he said.

"I swear to God I did not do nothing....I felt so uncomfortable even doing that. And, you know, the only reason why I did do it was because there was nobody else in there. And I'm not going to let her die," he said.

This isn't the first time Scheidt apparently faked being in a position of authority.

Four months after he was arrested on the charges relating to the medical center, he was again arrested, allegedly for impersonating a police officer.

Scheidt was allegedly driving through Miami Beach in what looked like a police cruiser when he was pulled over by undercover police officers.

Scheidt's grandfather has said the teen needs help.

"He isn't right upstairs," Thomas Scheidt Sr. told Good Morning America in September 2011. "He needs some psychiatric help."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Aug292012

Florida Teen on Trial for Allegedly Impersonating Physician's Assistant

Osceola County Sheriff's Office(KISSIMMEE, Fla.) -- The prosecutor in the trial of a Florida man accused of masquerading as a physician's assistant told jurors Tuesday that the defendant played the part so well that he even wore scrubs and a stethoscope.

Depending on whom you believe, Matthew Scheidt, 18, was either an overzealous teen interested in medicine or a skilled con-man playing doctor.  Scheidt was arrested on Sept. 2, 2011, after, police say, he posed as a physician's assistant at Osceola Regional Medical Center in Kissimmee, Fla.

"Matthew Scheidt had scrubs, stethoscope around his neck," prosecutor Sarah Freeman said in court Tuesday.  "He even had the lingo down."

Scheidt's attorney, Jamie Kane, in asserting Scheidt's innocence, blamed hospital administrators who gave the teen a badge meant for a physician's assistant without checking his credentials.

Edith Silva, a hospital human resources employee, testified that she never verified that he was a physician's assistant "because the office was very busy."

Scheidt's attorney says he never lied or never intended to deceive anyone, and that he told those who asked that he was a student.

"Anything Matthew Scheidt did was authorized by someone who thought he was a student, not a licensed practitioner," Kane added.

The prosecution lined up a series of witnesses who said the teen intentionally played the part of a professional.

"I walked into the room and observed Mr. Scheidt, stethoscope to a patient's chest, listening to breath sounds," said Devin Mone, an emergency room physician's assistant.  "And he had an IV catheter in his hand."

It all started last year when Scheidt, then 17, was employed as a clerk at a doctor's office across the street from Osceola Regional Medical Center.  He told police that when he went into the medical center to get his identification, he was given incorrect credentials.

Scheidt talked openly to police about what happened after his arrest and blamed the hospital for his alleged actions.

During the interrogation, Scheidt said that at one point after the real doctor left the room, he administered a resuscitation procedure on a patient who had overdosed.  He told interrogators that the doctor had asked him to perform the procedure.

"He said, 'Can you take over CPR?'" Scheidt said.  "I started doing CPR for a minute, two minutes, while he went to get medications and came back in.  That was it."

"I swear to God I did not do nothing. ...I felt so uncomfortable even doing that.  And, you know, the only reason why I did do it was because there was nobody else in there.  And I'm not going to let her die," he said.

Scheidt faces 30 years in prison for impersonating a physician's assistant, practicing medicine without a license and performing CPR on a patient who was overdosing.

The trial continues Wednesday.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Aug092012

Florida Teen Blames Hospital for His Alleged Impersonation

ABC News(MIAMI) -- A Florida teenager who administered CPR to a patient while allegedly pretending to be a physician's assistant has blamed the hospital, telling police he was mistakenly given an incorrect ID badge.

Matthew Scheidt, 18, was employed last year as a clerk at a doctor's office across the street from Osceola Regional Medical Center in Kissimmee, Fla.  Then 17, he told police that when he went into the medical center to get his identification, he was given incorrect credentials, according to a three-hour, police-interrogation video just obtained by ABC News affiliate WFTV.

He blamed the hospital for his alleged actions.

"Their error was putting me in apparently as a physician's assistant into their computer," Scheidt said in the video.  "Let's even say that I said I was a physician assistant. ... Are you that stupid that you are just going to put me in the system as that, without any credentials or any paperwork or nothing?"

During the September interrogation, Scheidt said, at one point after the real doctor left the room, he administered a resuscitation procedure on a patient who had overdosed.  He told interrogators that the doctor had asked him to perform the procedure.

"He said, 'Can you take over CPR?'" Scheidt said.  "I started doing CPR for a minute, two minutes, while he went to get medications and came back in.  That was it."

"I swear to God I did not do nothing.  I would not have done.  I felt so uncomfortable even doing that.  And, you know, the only reason why I did do it was because there was nobody else in there.  And I'm not going to let her die," he said.

The teen's alleged actions have prompted family members to shake their heads.

"He isn't right upstairs," his grandfather Thomas Scheidt Sr. told ABC's Good Morning America in September.  "He needs some psychiatric help."

This was not the only time the teen has been accused of faking a position.  Four months later, Scheidt was arrested while allegedly driving through Miami Beach in what looked like a police cruiser.

"They pulled him out of the vehicle, and they again asked him, 'Are you a police officer?'  To which he said 'No,'" Det. Juan Sanchez of the Miami Beach Police Department said.

Scheidt had even gone as far as allegedly stopping other drivers to tell them to put their seatbelts on, until undercover cops arrested him.

After hours of questioning over the hospital incident, Scheidt eventually became remorseful.

"I messed up," he said.  "I should have addressed it then when [the identification] was given to me."

Scheidt told investigators he feigned both professions because he wanted to learn about medicine, and had always wanted to be a cop.  His attorney is working hard to keep jurors from seeing the interrogation video in Scheidt's upcoming trial.

The teen faces up to 40 years in prison.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun152012

NY Man Charged with Impersonating ICE Agent, Handcuffing Teen

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- A Long Island, N.Y., man pleaded not guilty on Wednesday to charges of impersonating a federal agent and handcuffing a teen driver after a road rage incident.

On Sunday, 39-year-old insurance executive David Bradley turned on his emergency lights and pulled over a 19-year-old driver, according to Suffolk County police.  Clad in a bulletproof vest, Bradley identified himself as a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent, handcuffed the teen, Travis Melito, and then took him to his home, where he released him five minutes later, police said.

Police arrested him the next day, when Bradley went to a police precinct to file a complaint about the road rage incident.

Bradley, who is a father of two, faces charges of second-degree unlawful imprisonment and criminal impersonation.

Suffolk County district attorney spokesman Robert Clifford said prosecutors have eyewitness evidence that Bradley exited his vehicle, wearing a badge around his neck and carrying a handgun in his holster, and padded Melito down against his Mitsubishi before searching his car and driving him to his home in Port Jefferson Station.  When Bradley drove Melito back to his car and set him free, he told the teen, "This is your lucky day," Clifford said.

The district attorney's investigation is ongoing, Clifford said.

Anthony LaPinta, Bradley's attorney, said his client denies the allegations.  There was a "confrontation" between Bradley and the teen driver, but Bradley did not handcuff him or impersonate law enforcement, LaPinta said.

"[Bradley] is a decent person, he's a family man, he's an accomplished businessman with no prior convictions," LaPinta said, adding that the teen was intentionally fabricating the story.

It was not Bradley's first time allegedly impersonating an ICE agent.  He is charged with second-degree criminal impersonation in a May 4 incident in which police said he attempted to enter a crime scene.

Bradley is being held on $150,000 bail and is set to be indicted this week.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







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