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Entries in iPhones (3)

Friday
Feb222013

New York Police Set Up Team to Track Stolen iPhones, iPads

Hemera/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Apple has become one of the most popular gadget brands in the world — not only in sales, but in theft. With iPhones, iPads and iPods stolen so often, New York City police have teamed up with Apple Inc. to combat these crimes directly, the New York Post reports.

The NYPD has designated a special “team of cops” to pursue the theft of mobile Apple devices like iPhones and iPads. With the use of a device’s International Mobile Station Equipment Identity (IMSEI), it’s possible for Apple to track the whereabouts of a device and then share that information with the police.

“We’re looking for ways to find individuals who have stolen Apple products and return the products to their original owners,” NYPD spokesman Paul Browne told the Post. “It is being done to learn the pattern [of]  who is stealing.”

When reached by ABC News, Apple declined to comment on its involvement with the NYPD. The NYPD did not return ABC News’ request for comment.

In one case a stolen iPad was tracked all the way to the Dominican Republic and recovered with the help of an NYPD intelligence cop assigned to Santo Domingo, according to the Post.

The NYPD began Operation ID last September as an effort to encourage the public to register the serial numbers of their devices free of charge, ABC station WABC-TV reported.

“The theft of Apple phones and other hand-held devices drove the spike in robberies and larceny [in 2012]…Operation ID will help those whose property is lost or stolen to get it back,” Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly told WABC. According to the NYPD, more criminals are targeting Apple products, and while overall crime is up four percent in New York City, Apple product crime is up 40 percent.

Because of the rising rate of theft, there is even risk involved in buying one of these devices second-hand. Police say they can and will confiscate any stolen and resold devices and return them to their rightful owners. With Apple’s tracking system, it’s even possible to find a device after it’s been reregistered with a different wireless provider.

As reported by ABC News earlier this year, one creative New York man was able to reclaim his device without the help of the police or Apple.  Nadav Nirenberg left his iPhone in a New York City cab and noticed the person who had assumed possession of the device was posting on his online dating profile. Nirenberg created a fake profile to set up a “date” with the person using his phone.  The confrontation was not violent. Nirenberg got his phone back.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Oct062011

Pair Steals Huge Haul from Apple Store on Night of Steve Jobs’ Death

Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images(LITTLE ROCK, Ark.) -- Little Rock, Ark., police are still searching for two suspects who burglarized a local Apple store, making off with dozens of iPhones and iPads Wednesday night, just hours after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs’ death was announced.

According to the police report, the thieves stole 26 iPhones, 21 iPads, 10 Macbook computers, five iPod touches and one DVD. Two witnesses, Robert Blake and Amy Parker, both 30 and from Little Rock, told police they went to the store at 17711 Chenal Parkway to place flowers in memory of Jobs. They saw an unidentified black male run out of the store and get into a maroon Pontiac, which was driven by a second unidentified black male.

The first suspect was described as being 5-foot-8 and weighing around 140 pounds, who was wearing a white hat, white T-shirt and jeans. The second suspect was wearing a white hat, white shirt and green shorts.

The getaway car was described as a maroon two-door, with gray primer on the front driver’s side bumper, ABC affiliate KATV reported. It had Arkansas plates.

The store just celebrated its grand opening on Aug. 27.

Calls to Apple regarding the incident were not immediately returned.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Dec152010

US Army to Deploy Smartphones in Combat as Early as Spring

Photo Courtesy - US Army/ABC News(FORT BLISS, Texas) -- For many Americans, the smartphone is a constant source of intel on daily life, from tracking the whereabouts of friends and family to navigating city streets and finding the best price at the mall.  And as early as this spring, the U.S. Army could make iPhones, Androids, Blackberrys and similar devices standard-issue communication and intelligence-gathering tools on the front lines of the world's most dangerous battlefields.

"This is a profound and fundamental change about how soldiers will be able to access and share information," said Michael McCarthy, director of the mission command complex of the Army's Future Force Integration Directorate at Fort Bliss, Texas.

Troops with smartphones will be able to use text messages to more closely coordinate with their peers in the field and commanders at remote locations.  They'll also be able to stream real-time surveillance video from overhead drones to more effectively target the enemy, among other advantages, McCarthy said.

While the Army is still ironing out the details of a budget for the program, the benefits are expected to come at a relatively low cost to the military -- and taxpayers -- since the technology is commercially available and doesn't require significant investment for research and development.

The "Connecting Soldiers with Digital Applications" initiative began more than a year ago but is now several months ahead of schedule, officials say.  Tactical field tests with the smartphone technology have moved to advanced stages.

In the most recent exercise last week, a company-size Army unit used iPhones while running a simulated checkpoint, conducting tactical raids, and practicing local security sweeps.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio