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Entries in Isabel Celis (7)

Friday
May252012

Missing Arizona Girl’s Bedroom Had Possible Blood Stains

ABC News(TUCSON, Ariz.) -- New documents released in the case of missing 6-year-old Isabel Celis reveal that Arizona police found reddish-brown stains in the girl's bedroom and on household items during the investigation into her disappearance.

More than 550 pages of police documents were released in the case, which began when Celis' father called 911 on the morning of April 21, 2012, and reported her missing. He said he believed the girl had been abducted during the night, and when he went to check on her in the morning, she was gone.

The police reports released Thursday do not name a specific suspect or show any possible theories about what happened to the girl, but detail evidence found around the crime scene. One report shows that detectives saw "apparent blood on the floor" of Celis' bedroom, and took into custody a white hat and vinyl shower curtain that had "dark red-brown or brown stains" and were found in a car located outside the family's home.

In another report, detectives noted that one person interviewed during the investigation "said that a guy who was staying with the family owed someone a lot of money and that's why she was taken." Another witness interview points the finger at Sergio Celis, the girl's father.

"(The man) went on to say that something didn't seem right about what was going on and alluded that he believed that the father was involved in some way," the police report said.

Sergio Celis, who reported Isabel missing, told police that he had fallen asleep on the couch on the night Isabel was taken, and that he had woken up and moved back to his bed around 5 a.m., just two hours before his wife awoke and left for work. She did not check on the little girl before she left for work, according to police.

The girl's father has come under scrutiny before, as child protective services in Tucson barred Sergio from having contact with his two sons, Isabel's brothers, during the investigation.

"A voluntary agreement was reached between Child Protective Services and the parents to restrict access or, voluntarily, for Sergio to give some space and distance away from the two older children," Tucson Police Chief Roberto Villasenor said.

Arizona's CPS also revealed that they had visited the family's home in December, though they would not disclose details of the visit.

"It's tough because we're already under a lot of stress because we don't have Isabel here, so to have more thrown on us, but we're strong and we'll be okay, we'll survive it. We just want her back," Becky Celis, the girl's mother, said.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
May192012

Isabel Celis: Mom Attends Vigil, Defends Husband

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The mother of missing Tucson girl Isabel Celis led hundreds of people on a candlelight walk for her daughter Friday as questions mounted against her husband, who has been barred from contacting the couple's two children.

"It's tough because we're already under a lot of stress because we don't have Isabel here, so to have more thrown on us, but we're strong and we'll be okay, we'll survive it. We just want her back," Rebecca Celis said.

Sergio Celis, the father of the missing 6-year-old, was told last week by authorities he cannot have contact with the girl's two older brothers, who are now in the custody of their mother.

Child Protective Services officials had visited the family's home in December, but officials declined to discuss the circumstances.

Rebecca Celis said her husband wanted to attend the vigil, but was unable to since one of her sons wanted to be there.

"My husband's a great father who loves his boys, who loves his daughter. He's a great husband, a great father. At the end of the day when she comes home, everybody's questions will be answered," Celis told ABC affiliate KGUN.

Police said the development does not mean that investigators are turning their focus on Sergio Celis in the disappearance of his daughter.

"A voluntary agreement was reached between Child Protective Services and the parents to restrict access or, voluntarily, for Sergio to give some space and distance away from the two older children," Tucson Police Chief Roberto Villasenor said.

Isabel Celis was reported missing by her father around 8 a.m. April 21 after her mother left for work and her father went to wake her up.

The girl was not in her room, and a bedroom window was opened with the screen removed, police said.

In a 911 call released last week, Sergio Celis sounds calm as he describes finding that the 6-year-old has disappeared from her bed and tells police he thinks she was abducted.

"I want to report a missing person," Sergio Celis says on one of the two recordings, made the morning of April 21. "My little girl, who is 6 years old – I believe she was abducted from our house."

The second recording is of a call featuring Isabel's 14-year-old brother, Sergio, who later gives the phone to his mother after she returns home from work. Both the boy and his mother are frantic, though the woman seems to control herself when she is asked for specific information about the girl's height and weight, what she was wearing, and her hair and eyes.

Police have searched homes in the family's neighborhood, dug through a nearby landfill and searched waterways and drainage systems in Tucson. More than 1,000 tips have poured in regarding the 6-year-old's disappearance.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
May142012

Isabel Celis 911 Calls Released: ‘My Little Girl…I Believe She Was Abducted’

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(TUCSON, Ariz.) -- The father of missing Tucson, Ariz., girl Isabel Celis sounds calm as he describes finding that the 6-year-old has disappeared from her bed and tells police he thinks she was abducted in the recordings of two 911 calls released Monday by police.

“I want to report a missing person,” Sergio Celis says on one of the two recordings, made the morning of April 21. “My little girl, who is 6 years old -- I believe she was abducted from our house.”

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The second recording is of a call featuring Isabel’s 14-year-old brother, Sergio, who later gives the phone to his mother after she returns home from work. Both the boy and his mother are frantic, though the woman seems to control herself when she is asked for specific information about the girl’s height and weight, what she was wearing, and her hair and eyes.

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Police Monday also discussed the decision to bar the elder Sergio Celis from contact with his two sons, though they declined to provide any specifics about the reason for the decision. They said the move should not be interpreted as an indication that Sergio Celis is a suspect in his daughter’s disappearance.

“A voluntary agreement was reached between Child Protective Services and the parents to restrict access or, voluntarily, for Sergio to give some space and distance away from the two older children,” Tucson Police Chief Roberto Villasenor said.

“This doesn’t mean that we have settled on a path with this investigation,” he said.

He added that investigators are looking at all possibilities.

“Probably, [there are] about 12 to 15 detectives that are assigned to follow external viewpoints on this investigation, the possibility of a stranger abduction or something of that like,” he said. “And then, we have probably four detectives or so that are following the possibility of inside-the-family involvement.”

Isabel Celis was reported missing by her father around 8 a.m. April 21 after her mother left for work and her father went to wake her up. The girl was not in her room, and a bedroom window was opened with the screen removed, police said. The little girl was last seen around 11 p.m. April 20, when she was put to bed.

After Isabel was reported missing, police interviewed 15 registered sex offenders in the neighborhood.

Police have searched homes in the family’s neighborhood, dug through a nearby landfill and searched waterways and drainage systems in Tucson. More than 1,000 tips have poured in regarding the 6-year-old’s disappearance, police said.

Isabel’s parents made several public, emotional pleas for the safe return of their daughter in the days after her disappearance.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
May132012

Isabel Celis: Missing Tucson Girl's Father Barred From Contact With Her Brothers

ABC News(TUSCON, Ariz.) -- The father of missing Tucson 6-year-old Isabel Celis has been told by authorities he cannot have contact with the girl's two older brothers, who are now in the custody of their mother Rebecca, ABC News has learned.

A source close to the investigation said the development does not mean that investigators are turning their focus on Sergio Celis in the disappearance of his daughter. A police statement released Friday said it is "common practice for CPS [Child Protective Services] to become involved in investigations regarding missing children."

Calls to Sergio Celis and his wife -- who are no longer living together -- were not returned today. Other family members reached by phone refused to comment.

The police statement said new information regarding the welfare of the older Celis children led detectives to contact officials with Child Protective Services and call in Isabel's family for a meeting Friday. The statement did not specify what prompted the detectives and child welfare workers to take action.

"CPS instituted certain measures to ensure the continued welfare of the Celis children," the statement said.

A Tucson police spokesman, reached this evening, declined to provide additional details.

Isabel Celis was reported missing by her father around 8 a.m. April 21 after her mother left for work and her father went to wake her up.

The girl was not in her room, and a bedroom window was opened with the screen removed, police said.

The little girl was last seen around 11 p.m. April 20, when she was put to bed.

Police say they haven't eliminated anyone as a suspect, including the Celis family. They also haven't eliminated the possibility that investigators will find Isabel and bring her home safely, they say.

After Isabel was reported missing, police interviewed 15 registered sex offenders in the neighborhood.

Police have searched homes in the family's neighborhood, dug through a nearby landfill and searched waterways and drainage systems in Tucson. More than 1,000 tips have poured in regarding the six-year-old's disappearance, police said.

Isabel's parents made several public, emotional pleas for the safe return of their daughter in the days after her disappearance.

"Just please, please, to the person or persons who have Isabel, tell us what you want. We will do anything for her. We're looking for you, Isa," Sergio Celis said tearfully.

The search has also extended into Mexico, where authorities in the state of Sonora have been circulating photos of Isabel.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
May112012

Isabel Celis: Missing Tucson Girl's Brothers Removed From Care of One Parent

ABC News(TUSCON, Ariz.) -- The two older brothers of missing Tucson girl Isabel Celis were removed from the care of one parent on Friday after Child Protective Services consulted with police.

Authorities declined to say which parent, Sergio or Becky, has custody of the children.

"There's a lot of details that I can't share with you: what got us to this point, what was that information," Lt. Fabian Pacheco of the Tucson Police Department told ABC News' Tucson affiliate.

Isabel Celis was reported missing by her father around 8 a.m. April 21 after her mother left for work and her father went to wake her up.

The six-year-old was not in her room, and a bedroom window was opened with the screen removed, police said.

The little girl was last seen around 11 p.m. April 20, when she was put to bed.

Police haven't eliminated anyone as a suspect, including the Celis family. They also haven't eliminated the possibility that investigators will find Isabel and bring her home safely.

After Isabel was reported missing, police interviewed 15 registered sex offenders in the neighborhood.

Police have searched homes in the family's neighborhood, dug through a nearby landfill and searched waterways and drainage systems in Tucson. More than 1,000 tips have poured in regarding the six-year-old's disappearance, police said.

Isabel's parents made several public, emotional pleas for the safe return of their daughter in the days after her disappearance.

"Just please, please, to the person or persons who have Isabel, tell us what you want. We will do anything for her. We're looking for you, Isa," Sergio Celis said tearfully.

The search has also extended into Mexico, where authorities in the state of Sonora have been circulating photos of Isabel.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Apr292012

Isabel Celis: Man Captured in Surveillance Video Comes Forward, Search Expanded

ABC News (TUSCON, Ariz.) -- A man captured in a surveillance video could be a key witness in the case of a missing Tucson, Ariz. girl as authorities expand their search into Mexico.

A group of five people were captured on surveillance video leaving a club near the Celis family home around the time the 6-year-old disappeared.

The three women and two men were captured on camera just a block from the Celis house.

Police said the group was walking away from a club at 1:30 a.m. in the direction of the Celis' home.

One of the men has come forward to police, but police are not yet saying what he has told them.

 

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The new surveillance video comes as the search for Isabel widens, crossing over into Mexico.

On Saturday, U.S. marshals asked Mexican police for help checking hotels, bus terminals, and businesses in the border town of Sonora where Isabel's photo is being circulated.

"The idea of having Mexico involved I think is a logical idea and a good idea at this point…"The idea that somebody crossed and picked up Isabel and then went back into Mexico is actually realistic," said former FBI agent and ABC News consultant Brad Garrett.

Tucson is close to the Mexican border and many in the city are either from Mexico or have connections there.

Isabel Celis was reported missing by her father around 8 a.m. April 21 after her mother left for work and her father went to wake her up. The child was not in her room, and a bedroom window was opened with the screen removed, police said.

She was last seen around 11 p.m. April 20, when she was put to bed.

"If this child were abducted out of her house, through a window, out a door, somebody may have seen that," said Brad Garrett, a former FBI agent and ABC News consultant.

While the police have not ruled out Celis's parents as suspects, they have said the family has cooperated fully with police during the investigation.

"We have tremendous gratitude to the millions of people around the world who have prayed for Isabel," Becky Celis said. "Please continue to pray for her return. We don't want the focus to be taken off Isabel by talking in front of the cameras."

FBI search dogs, including a scent dog and a cadaver dog, hit on something in the house that police noted was "important" to the investigation on April 22. Police then executed search warrants on the Celis home and other homes in the neighborhood, though they would not say which ones.

Authorities are awaiting lab results of the evidence gathered, sources told ABC News.

Police have searched homes in the family's neighborhood, dug through a nearby landfill and searched waterways and drainage systems in Tucson, but so far have few leads.

The missing girl's parents issued a plea this week for the safe return of their daughter.

"Just please, please, to the person or persons who have Isabel, tell us what you want. We will do anything for her. We're looking for you, Isa," Sergio Celis, the girl's father, said tearfully.

Standing with family members clad in matching "Bring Isa Home" T-shirts, Celis and his wife, Becky, spoke directly to their daughter's captor, saying in both English and Spanish that they would do anything for her return. The parents have offered $6,000 for information about her disappearance.

Police noted that there are 15 registered sex offenders in the neighborhood, all of whom have been interviewed by police.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Apr282012

Isabel Celis: Tucson Police Looking For Group Seen On Surveillance Video 

ABC News (TUCSON, Ariz.) -- Tucson, Arizona police are looking for a group of five people who were captured on surveillance video leaving a club near the home of Isabel Celis around the time the 6-year-old disappeared.

The three women and two men were captured on camera just a block from the Celis house on the night the girl vanished.

Police said the group was walking away from a club at 1:30 a.m.

"We want them to come forward and tell us did they or did they not see anything unusual," a Tucson police spokesperson said.

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Isabel Celis was reported missing by her father around 8 a.m. April 21 after her mother left for work and her father went to wake her up. The child was not in her room, and a bedroom window was opened with the screen removed, police said.

The little girl was last seen around 11 p.m. April 20, when she was put to bed.

"If this child were abducted out of her house, through a window, out a door, somebody may have seen that," said Brad Garrett, a former FBI agent and ABC News consultant.

While the police have not ruled out Celis's parents as suspects, they have said the family has cooperated fully with police during the investigation.

"We have tremendous gratitude to the millions of people around the world who have prayed for Isabel," Becky Celis said. "Please continue to pray for her return. We don't want the focus to be taken off Isabel by talking in front of the cameras."

FBI search dogs, including a scent dog and a cadaver dog, hit on something in the house that police noted was "important" to the investigation on April 22. Police then executed search warrants on the Celis home and other homes in the neighborhood, though they would not say which ones.

Authorities are awaiting lab results of the evidence gathered, sources told ABC News.

Police have searched homes in the family's neighborhood, dug through a nearby landfill and searched waterways and drainage systems in Tucson, but so far have few leads.

The missing girl's parents issued a plea this week for the safe return of their daughter.

"Just please, please, to the person or persons who have Isabel, tell us what you want. We will do anything for her. We're looking for you, Isa," Sergio Celis, the girl's father, said tearfully.

Standing with family members clad in matching "Bring Isa Home" t-shirts, Celis and his wife, Becky, spoke directly to their daughter's captor, saying in both English and Spanish that they would do anything for her return. The parents have offered $6,000 for information about her disappearance.

Police noted that there are 15 registered sex offenders in the neighborhood, all of whom have been interviewed by police.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio