SEARCH

Entries in Jay Carney (2)

Monday
Jun252012

No Fast and Furious Cover-Up, Obama Aide Claims

Comstock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Asked about the President’s assertion of executive privilege in the Congressional investigation of the Fast and Furious matter, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney quickly jumped on what committee Chairman Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., told Fox News over the weekend: that “there is no evidence, let me repeat no evidence, of White House involvement in any cover up or attempt to cover up this issue,” Carney said.

Critics of the administration have summarized the furor over the now "frozen" material by asking if the administration has nothing to hide, why did President Obama use executive privilege to lock down the documents Issa requested?

Carney, speaking to reporters on board Air Force One, repeated that the Department of Justice and the attorney general have provided an enormous number of documents to the committee investigating the Fast and Furious program and that the attorney general has testified repeatedly about this matter -- though the Department of Justice decided to withdraw some of the documents entered as testimony as innacurate. The program involved shipping guns over the border to Mexico to drug dealers but the government quickly lost track of the guns. The weapons have beeen linked to the deaths of an unknown number of Mexicans, and U.S. Border Agent Brian Terry.

Carney insisted the material being kept from Issa have nothing to do with the growing scandal. “All of the documents under executive privilege are after the Feb 4th date where -- beyond which these documents are simply kind of internal deliberative documents that every administration should be able to keep private,” Carney said, adding that the administration remains ready to try to resolve this issue in a way that is satisfactory to both sides.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Dec162011

White House Stands by Medal of Honor Recipient Sgt. Dakota Meyer

ABC News(WASHINGTON) – The White House stood by Sgt. Dakota Meyer, medal of honor recipient, on Thursday, after being asked by a reporter from McClatchy newspapers about her organization’s investigation, which concluded that “crucial parts of the story of Meyer’s deeds that the Marine Corps publicized and Obama described to the nation are untrue, unsubstantiated or exaggerated.”

“The president was very proud to present the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Meyer for his extraordinary service in Afghanistan,” White House press secretary Jay Carney said.

The McClatchy newspapers story stated that Meyer “didn’t save as many people, kill as many enemy fighters or lead the final push to retrieve his dead comrades, as the record says. Moreover, it’s unclear from the documents whether the 23-year-old Kentucky native disobeyed orders when he entered the Ganjgal Valley on Sept. 8, 2009, as the record says he did.”

Carney said that the White House is not concerned and not looking into the Medal of Honor narrative.

“The answer to your question is no,” he said. “Everyone, even the reporter who wrote yesterday’s article, agrees Sergeant Meyer displayed extraordinary heroism. Indeed, a subsequent article within, I think, hours by that same reporter last night, makes it clear that Meyer’s comrades feel he deserves the Medal of Honor. President Obama was proud to present it on behalf of a grateful nation.”

The writer, the well-respected Jonathan Landay, did note that, “What’s most striking is that all this probably was unnecessary. Meyer, the 296th Marine to earn the medal, by all accounts deserved his nomination. At least seven witnesses attested to him performing heroic deeds “in the face of almost certain death.”

Carney said “I would refer you to the Marine Corps. And the process of vetting for Medal of Honor — proposed Medal of Honor recipients is, as I understand it, quite extensive and thorough. Obviously that’s done at the Department of Defense and by the branch of the military that’s affected here, in this case the Marine Corps. The president was very proud to present the Medal of Honor to Sergeant Meyer. He was that day and he remains proud today of his extraordinary service.”

Carney said the “president’s remarks were based on the extensive documentation provided by the Department of Defense and the Marine Corps, including sworn testimony from Sergeant Meyer himself and sworn eyewitness testimonies of others present at the scene. White House staff also personally spoke with Sergeant Meyer. .. The president remains very proud of Sergeant Meyer and the remarkable acts of bravery that he displayed on that day.”

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio