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Entries in Joran van der Sloot (4)

Thursday
Jan122012

Natalee Holloway Is Dead, Judge Decides

Dana Mixer/Getty Images(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) -- An Alabama judge reportedly announced Thursday that he will declare missing Alabama teen Natalee Holloway to be dead. The decision comes six years after her disappearance in Aruba on the last day of a senior class trip to celebrate their high school graduation.

The request for Holloway to be declared dead came from her father Dave Holloway who claimed in the court papers that because there is no evidence Natalee is alive, the time has come to declare her legally dead.

Natalee's mother opposed the court proceeding.

"Beth's position is she has no proof or indication that Natalee is still alive, but absent any proof or indication that she is dead, she always wants to hang onto that slight glimmer of hope," said Beth Holloway's attorney, John Q. Kelly. "No mother likes to, without evidence, have her daughter declared dead. She wants to carry around her around in her heart."

The court hearing comes a day after court proceedings in Peru where the main suspect in Holloway's disappearance, Joran van der Sloot, pleaded guilty to murdering a different woman. Van der Sloot entered the plea Wednesday and is awaiting sentencing by the Peruvian court. He has admitted to killing 21-year-old Stephany Flores, a Peruvian businesswoman, on May 30, 2010, the fifth anniversary of Natalee's disappearance.

Van der Sloot, a Dutch citizen, was never formally charged with Holloway's death in Aruba, but was arrested and held for questioning in the matter twice.

Natalee Holloway was on the last day of a graduation trip to Aruba with her senior class at Mountain Brook High School in Alabama when she did not return to her hotel. She was last seen in a car with several people, including Van Der Sloot.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jan122012

Natalee Holloway Expected to Be Declared Legally Dead

Dana Mixer/Getty ImagesUPDATE: An Alabama judge announced Thursday that he will declare missing Alabama teen Natalee Holloway to be dead.

(BIRMINGHAM, Ala.) -- The search for missing teen Natalee Holloway could officially end Thursday when an Alabama judge is expected to declare her dead.

A court hearing in Birmingham will determine whether Holloway, who has not been seen or heard from since she disappeared on an Aruban beach in 2005, is officially considered dead in the eyes of the law. Dave Holloway, the teen's father, claimed in the court papers that because there is no evidence Natalee is alive and that the time has come to declare her legally dead.

Natalee's mother, however, opposes the court proceeding.

"Beth's position is she has no proof or indication that Natalee is still alive, but absent any proof or indication that she is dead, she always wants to hang onto that slight glimmer of hope," said Beth Holloway's attorney, John Q. Kelly. "No mother likes to, without evidence, have her daughter declared dead. She wants to carry around her around in her heart."

Kelly noted that the hearing Thursday is likely a foregone conclusion, as the judge will ask to see any evidence that Natalee is still alive and, absent any, will declare her dead. She will either be declared dead Thursday or after another formal waiting period, he said.

Neither he nor Holloway would attend the hearing, he said.

Beth Holloway, who is now divorced from the girl's father, recently called Dave's actions "inexplicable" and said she was taken by surprise when she found out Dave had filed the petition in Birmingham court.

The court hearing comes a day after court proceedings in Peru where the main suspect in Holloway's disappearance, Joran van der Sloot, pleaded guilty to murdering a different woman. Van der Sloot entered the plea Wednesday and is awaiting sentencing by the Peruvian court. He has admitted to killing 21-year-old Stephany Flores, a Peruvian businesswoman, on May 30, 2010, the fifth anniversary of Natalee's disappearance.

Van der Sloot, a Dutch citizen, was never formally charged with Holloway's death in Aruba, but was arrested and held for questioning in the matter twice.

Natalee Holloway was on the last day of a graduation trip to Aruba with her senior class at Mountain Brook High School in Alabama when she did not return to her hotel. She was last seen in a car with several people, including Van Der Sloot.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov082010

Natalee Holloway's Mom Confronts Daughter's Suspected Killer in Jailhouse Meeting

Photo Courtesy - ABC News(NEW YORK) -- The visibly shaken mother of missing American teenager Natalee Holloway pleads for answers from the prime suspect in the girl's disappearance in recently released hidden camera video of the dramatic, face-to-face jailhouse encounter.

"I want to know what happened and I want to move on, Joran," Beth Twitty is seen telling prime suspect Joran van der Sloot during a secretive meeting in September at Peru's Castro Castro prison where van Der Sloot is being held in connection to a Peruvian woman's murder. "I want to move on in my life and I can't close the book."

But van der Sloot offers her nothing more than a vague admission to making "bad decisions" and says he'll tell her more in a letter.

"It's very hard for me to talk to you. It's really not easy," he says in the video which was part of a recently released Dutch documentary. "I've made so many bad decisions for all the wrong reasons... I'm really very addicted to perks, especially gambling. That's why I've told so many lies."

Twitty tells van der Sloot that she's trying to help him.

"I felt like you didn't listen to me and I wanted you to tell me what happened and let me take her home," Twitty tells van der Sloot, apparently referring to the last time the two spoke in person five years ago.

"That's always been my problem," van der Sloot says. "I've never listened to anyone who's meant well for me."

After the meeting's conclusion, Twitty is left crying alone in the room, apparently no closer to knowing what happened to her 18-year-old daughter who disappeared from a school vacation in Aruba in 2005.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov012010

Natalee Holloway's Mom Speaks on Alleged Extortion Plot

Photo Courtesy - ABC News / Handout Photo(NEW YORK) -- The mother of missing American teenager Natalee Holloway spoke out for the first time about an alleged extortion attempt by Joran Van Der Sloot, the lead suspect in her daughter's disappearance, in which he allegedly offered to "bring [her] Natalee" in exchange for $250,000.

"He was ready to tell the truth and lead me to the truth and lead me to Natalee's remains," Beth Twitty told Dutch reporter Peter De Vries in a new Dutch documentary.

Natalee Holloway disappeared from vacation in Aruba in 2005. Van der Sloot, the longtime prime suspect in the teenager's disappearance, reportedly confessed to involvement in the girl's death several times, but later retracted the confessions. Van der Sloot is currently being held in a Peruvian prison, accused of murdering a young Peruvian woman in May of this year.

In the Dutch documentary, Twitty said that van der Sloot reached out to her nearly five years after her daughter disappeared, offering information that would lead to Holloway's remains for the right price.

"I will bring you to Natalee, but the information that comes from me has to remain a secret,” van der Sloot wrote in an e-mail to Twitty's lawyer, John Kelly, according to Twitty. “In return, I want to receive $250,000. If you're interested, I'll give you more details.”

Desperate, Twitty said she paid van der Sloot $25,000, but never received any information. Instead, van der Sloot traveled to Peru where a few weeks later he was arrested and charged in the murder of a 21-year-old Peruvian woman.

The FBI launched an extortion investigation weeks before the Peruvian woman's death, but did not issue a warrant for his arrest at the time because they lacked sufficient evidence.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







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