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Entries in Minneapolis (7)

Friday
Dec072012

Baby Switched at Minneapolis Hospital, Breastfed by Wrong Mom

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) -- A newborn baby will have to undergo a year of medical tests for HIV and hepatitis because he was accidentally put in the wrong bassinette by a Minneapolis hospital and then breastfed by the wrong mother.

The mix-up happened Wednesday in Abbott Northwestern Hospital when Tammy Van Dyke's little boy Cody was accidentally switched to the wrong bassinette in the nursery.

"You put your baby in the nursery, not even 48-hours old, and you think they're safe," Van Dyke told ABC News.  "I'm holding it together.  I'm just in disbelief, and it was like I was in a dream, a bad dream, and I couldn't get it to stop."

Van Dyke was told about the incident two hours after it happened and just hours before she was going to take Cody home.

The infant had to undergo blood testing for HIV and hepatitis immediately following the switch.

"It was horrible," Van Dyke said.  "Two nurses had to go in through veins in his tiny little arms."

Although the tests came back negative, Abbott Northwestern Hospital told Van Dyke her newborn son would have to undergo blood testing every three months for a year.

Hospital spokeswoman Gloria O'Connell said the tests were "just a precaution," but declined to elaborate because of patient confidentiality.

Van Dyke was able to speak with the other mother, who had to wait 20 minutes before her baby, Liam, was located.

"It gave me peace of mind to talk to her," Van Dyke said.  "She was just as distraught as me that this happened to her, and in the meantime, also didn't know where her baby was.  She has twins."

In an apology letter given to Van Dyke, the hospital states:

"Please accept this letter with our sincerest apologies for what occurred today at the hospital, that in the nursery your newborn son was placed in the wrong bassinette and then was taken to the wrong mother and breastfed.  The hospital agrees to pay for the additional testing that you had done today and will also pay for the tests recommended for your son related to this incident up to one year."

And in a press release from Abbott Northwestern, practicing obstetrician and Chief Clinical Officer of Allina Health, Dr. Penny Wheeler, said, "As an obstetrician, I have personally seen verification of the infant's identifying name band matched correctly with the mother's on hundreds of occasions.  It is extremely unfortunate that was not the case this time.  We sincerely apologize to the involved families and will make certain we understand why our procedures were not appropriately followed in this case."

"I will be thankful to God when this year's over and he's cleared all his health tests and we don't have to think about this again," Van Dyke said.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Sep282012

Minneapolis Shooter Spared Some, Shot Others; Fifth Victim Dies

Joseph Devenney/Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- The man who shot up a Minneapolis sign-making business selected his targets carefully, walking past some employees while shooting others, police said Friday.

Minneapolis Police Chief Tim Dolan Friday detailed Andrew Engeldinger's shooting rampage as a fifth victim died from wounds. Engeldinger shot himself in the head, bringing the total of Thursday's carnage to six.

Engeldinger, 36, shot up Accent Signage Systems Thursday afternoon just hours after he was fired from the company.

"It was a case he was terminated that day. He did come back about 4:25 to that location, parked his car and walked in the loading dock area and immediately started shooting people at that location," Minneapolis Police Chief Tim Dolan said during a news conference Friday, according to the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

The chief said Engeldinger did not fire indiscriminately at people, but picked out his targets.

"It's clear he did walk by some people, he did walk by people to get to certain other members of the business," Dolan said.

The chief said Engeldinger used a 9mm Glock semi-automatic pistol he had owned for about a year. Police who searched Engeldinger's home early Friday found another gun, Dolan said. He said that Engeldinger had purchased the guns a year ago and had been practicing shooting them. They found packaging for 10,000 rounds of ammunition in the house, he said.

"He's obviously been practicing in how to use that gun," Dolan said.

The bodies of the four victims were found shortly after police arrived at the scene while evacuating other employees, according to a police statement.

Minneapolis Police Deputy Chief Kristine Arneson said Engeldinger died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

The company's owner, Reuven Rahamim, was killed in the shooting as well as United Parcel Service driver Keith Basinski. The other three victims' names were not released.

Two people also injured in Thursday's shooting remained at Hennepin County Medical Center Friday. One was in serious condition and the other remained critical.

Barbara Haynes was driving home from her teaching job when she got stuck in traffic near the scene.

"I've never seen that many police vehicles on the scene and SWAT teams, uniforms, the guns ... pretty heavy artillery," Haynes told ABC News.

Marques Jones, 18, of Minneapolis, said he was outside a building down the street having his high school senior pictures taken when he and his photographer heard gunfire that sounded close.

"We heard about four to five gunshots," Jones said. "We were shocked at what happened and we just looked at each other. We all just took off running to our vehicles."

Accent Signage Systems' website says the company makes interior signage and listed its founder as Rahamim.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Sep282012

Shooter Among 'Several' Dead at Minneapolis Company, Police Say

Joseph Devenney/Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- A deadly shooting at a sign company late Thursday afternoon in Minneapolis, Minn., left several people dead, including the shooter, law enforcement officials say.

Authorities say the shooting occurred around 4:30 p.m. at Accent Signage Systems in the Bryn Mawr neighborhood of Minneapolis, ABC News affiliate KSTP-TV reports.

The shooter, who died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, was found inside the building, police say, but they wouldn't give any other details about the gunman.

Police also refused to provide specifics about how many victims were killed in Thursday's shooting.  At an evening news conference, according to KSTP,  Minneapolis Police Deputy Chief Kris Arneson would only say, "We do have several victims inside that are dead."

KSTP also reports three people were transported to Hennepin County Medical Center with gunshot wounds and are listed in critical condition.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Aug022012

Minnesota Bridge Collapse Anniversary: How Safe Are Drivers Now?

MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- It's been five years since more than 100 cars were traveling over a bridge on I-35W during a Minneapolis rush hour when it suddenly collapsed, dropping cars from the interstate into the 15-foot-deep Mississippi River below and trapping many passengers inside.  Before they could escape, 13 people died and another 145 were injured on one of the worst bridge disasters in U.S. history.

A formal investigation took more than a year, but once it was finished the National Transportation Safety Board said the cause of the I-35W Mississippi River bridge tragedy was a simple design flaw in the bridge's gusset plates -- metal plates that help connect one steel beam to another.  At that time, NTSB acting chairman Mark Rosenker said the board's investigation would "provide a roadmap for improvements to prevent future tragedies."

But five years after the collapse, Andrew Hermann, the president of the American Society of Engineers, told ABC News that while the nation has an aggressive bridge inspection program, the government is still not spending enough money on updating and maintaining the nation's infrastructure.

"Congress basically lacks the courage to do what is needed to raise the funds," he said.  "Bridges require maintenance, and maintenance and rehabilitation require funding... Politicians like to show up and cut a ribbon on a brand new bridge, but they don't like to show up and applaud a new paint job that may increase the life of a bridge."

At the time of the Minnesota bridge collapse, ABC News reported that the bridge had already been classified as "structurally deficient," meaning that while it was not deemed unsafe enough to close, it did require maintenance.

According to the Department of Transportation, bridges can be put on waiting lists for "replacement or rehabilitation" if they are classified as structurally deficient or "functionally obsolete;" the latter meaning the bridge was built prior to modern standards but was not necessarily unsafe.  A common example of a functionally obsolete bridge is one with road lanes that are too narrow.

When the Minnesota bridge collapsed in 2007, approximately 25.4 percent of the nearly 600,000 bridges in the U.S. were considered either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete, according to the DOT.  By 2011, the number dipped to 23.8 percent, still leaving nearly 150,000 bridges in the same categories.

But transportation officials stressed that it does not mean American drivers are traveling on thousands of unsafe bridges -- just ones that may need some type of repair or more frequent inspections.

The Federal Highway Administration "has implemented measures to more closely oversee the inspection process and identify inconsistencies and non-compliance," FHA Administrator Victor Mendez told ABC News.  "While there are a number of bridges that are typically more closely monitored than others based on their condition, they are structurally safe.  Unsafe bridges are closed."

The FHA said that bridges are generally inspected once every two years, depending on the bridge's age and traffic patterns.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jul302011

Planes Collide on Ground in Chicago

Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images(CHICAGO) -- A pair of Delta planes made contact while on the ground at O'Hare Airport in Chicago Friday evening, but the collision caused no injuries, an airport official said.

Delta confirmed two planes collided to ABC News affiliate KSTP of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. -- the destination of one of the flights.

That plane, Flight 2207, an Airbus 319, collided with an MD80 bound for Atlanta as it pushed back from the gate in Chicago just before 8 p.m. CT, Delta said. A passenger on board the Minnesota-bound plane told KSTP it was struck on the right wing.

Damage to the plane was being assessed, Delta told KSTP.

Passengers from Flight 2207 and Flight 1777, the Atlanta-bound plane, were removed from the planes as Delta tried to accommodate them on other flights, ABC News Chicago affiliate WGN reported.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Dec132010

Deadly Snowstorm Blasts Midwest; Freezing Temperatures Follow

Photo Courtesy - ABC News(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Midwest residents are bracing for bitter cold temperatures Monday after a powerful snow storm has been blamed for at least half a dozen deaths, canceled flights and the collapse of the Metrodome's roof in Minneapolis Sunday.

From Minnesota to Chicago, the massive storm -- 1,500 miles across at its widest part -- dumped a foot-and-a-half of snow in some areas.  The snowy conditions have been blamed for at least six deaths over the weekend as motorists endured zero visibility driving conditions amid highway closings in five states.

The blast of Canadian cold air headed southward after the season's first snowfall swept through cities in the midwest and the northeast.  Now these cities are experiencing frigid cold temperatures.  Winter weather warnings have been issued for 30 states along the East Coast including a freeze warning in Florida, with temperatures in some areas expected to fall into the 20s.

Monday in Minneapolis, temperatures are expected to drop to 15 degrees with a low of only two degrees.  This, after the city was hit with the worst snowfall in almost 20 years, with more than two feet of snow in some areas.´╗┐

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Dec122010

Stadium's Roof Deflates Under Pressure from Winter Storm

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Harsh weather has collapsed the Metrodome in Minneapolis. The panels of the Metrodome roof started giving way around 5 a.m. and deflated after the storm, which dumped more than 17 inches of snow on the city, Chairman of the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission Roy Terwilliger told ABC News affiliate KSTP in Minneapolis - St. Paul.

A Sunday NFL football game between the New York Giants and the Minnesota Vikings had already been pushed to Monday, as the Giants were stranded in Kansas City, unable to reach Minneapolis after the Twin Cities' airport was closed. The game will be played in Detroit on Monday.

Terwilliger says this has only happened three other times in the Metrodome's history, the last being on April 14, 1983. Workers were being kept out of the Metrodome for safety reasons Sunday morning, but crews were back on top of it late Sunday morning clearing snow.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio´╗┐







ABC News Radio