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Entries in Muslim Brotherhood (2)

Wednesday
Jul182012

Muslim Rights Group Counters Bachmann National Security Allegations

Jonathan Ernst/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- A Muslim human rights group has issued a strong response to the allegations from House Republican members that longtime Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin’s family, as well as other prominent Muslim-Americans working within the U.S. government, have ties to Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood.

Corey Saylor, a spokesperson for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, also known as CAIR, calls questioning the loyalty of "patriotic American Muslims" based on what he says are old anti-Muslim conspiracy theories “beyond the pale.”

Five GOP members of Congress, including former presidential candidate Michelle Bachman, sent letters to the Inspector General offices for the State Department, as well as the Departments of Homeland Security, Justice, Defense and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, questioning whether Abedin and other prominent Muslims are part of a plot by Islamic extremists to infiltrate the U.S. government; an attack, incidentally, CAIR itself has weathered.

“America wants a serious national security conversation,” says Saylor. “Michelle Bachmann is giving us a six degrees of separation drinking game.”

CAIR, a Washington-based Islamic advocacy group founded in 1994, is not alone in its condemnation. On Wednesday veteran Republican Senator John McCain gave a spirited defense of Abedin, calling the allegations against her “ugly” and “sinister.” He chastised his GOP colleagues in the House saying that no one, “not least a member of Congress,” should launch such a, “degrading attack against fellow Americans on the basis of nothing more than fear of who they are and ignorance of that they stand for.”

State Department deputy spokesperson Patrick Ventrell also shot down the accusations, calling them “preposterous.”

Saylor says that Abedin and the other Muslim officials listed in the House letter are American citizens who are, “asking what they can do for their nation,” and now Bachmann, "seems to be punishing them for the sin of offering that service during a Democratic administration,” he says.

In addition to Abedin, the letters also cite Mohamed Elibiary, an advisor to the Department of Homeland Security named in the letter, as also having possible ties to extremists.  Last year Elibiary was given an award by the Society of Former Special Agents for his counter-terrorism work with the FBI.

“Now his contributions have been rewarded by Bachmann questioning his patriotism,” says Saylor.

Minnesota Representative Keith Ellison, the only Muslim member of Congress, has sent letters to Bachmann demanding she and her GOP colleagues produce evidence backing up their claims. Ellison told CNN’s Anderson Cooper that the allegations are “the worst of guilt by association,” said Ellison. “It is a stark affront to American values.”

Bachmann has issued a statement saying that Ellison has “distorted” the letters by taking certain comments out of context. “The intention of the letters was to outline the serious national security concerns I had and ask for answers to questions regarding the Muslim Brotherhood and other radical group’s access to top Obama administration officials,” said Bachmann.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Mar112011

New Video Suggests NPR Considered Accepting Bogus Donation

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Just a day after CEO Vivian Schiller resigned because of a leaked video that featured an NPR fundraiser denigrating Republicans and Tea Party members, a new recording released Thursday apparently shows that the news organization was ready to accept a $5 million check from a phony group linking itself to the Muslim Brotherhood.

Conservative activist James O'Keefe, who made the secret tape, says that a man posing as a representative from a group called the Muslim Education Action Center had a conversation with NPR’s senior director of institutional giving, Betsy Liley, in which she advised the group to make the contribution anonymously so as to avoid a government audit.

When further pressed about it, Liley tells a man identifying himself as Ibrahim Kasaam that since the IRS occasionally audits NPR's programs, "you might want to be an anonymous donor.  And, we would certainly, if that was your interest, want to shield you from that."

Responding to this latest accusation of possible impropriety, NPR released a series of e-mails that apparently reveal that it had at no time seriously considered the bogus $5 million from "the fraudulent organization."

NPR spokeswoman Anna Christopher told the website TPM that the agreement "never got beyond the internal drafting stage -- and was never sent.  Period."

Before resigning, Vivian Schiller wrote to Betsy Liley that the Muslim Education Action Center was acting oddly and that she wouldn’t take the money without more information, including data about the group that would need to be provided to the IRS.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio