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Entries in Performance Enhancing Drugs (6)

Friday
Jul132012

Lance Armstrong Gets a Favor on Capitol Hill

Bryn Lennon/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong appears to have found a friend in Congress to help wage war on his new nemesis, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency.

Armstrong is facing USADA doping charges that threaten to strip him of his Tour titles and ban him for life from elite sports.

People on the inside of the case aren’t the least bit surprised the apparent help is coming from the Wisconsin home of Trek Bicycles, Armstrong’s longtime sponsor.

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., on Thursday sent a letter to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) to investigate “the use of the roughly $9 million in taxpayer funding given to the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).”

USADA is the agency that acts as the nation’s top cop for doping in sports and regularly tests athletes to ensure clean results.  It is generally not considered controversial, but is seen as a safeguard for clean competition, working hand in hand with the international group, the World Anti-Doping Agency.

In response to Sensenbrenner’s letter, USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart said the case against Armstrong “was not brought lightly.”

“The evidence is overwhelming, and were we not to bring this case, we would be complicit in covering up evidence of doping, and failing to do our job on behalf of those we are charged with protecting,” Tygart wrote.  “We will reach out to Congressman Sensenbrenner and offer to come in and discuss the process, which is the same in all cases whether it involves high-profile athletes or those who are not.”

Earlier this week, Armstrong attempted to have his USADA case thrown out in federal court but a judge quickly rejected his claim.  His legal team has since filed a new lawsuit and is awaiting a hearing.

Also this week, three of Armstrong’s former team doctors and trainers were given lifetime bans by the USADA for their roles in running what one source called “one of the worst and deepest doping conspiracies the world has ever seen.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jul122012

Lance Armstrong Gets 30-Day Extension to Answer Doping Charges

Michael Stewart/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The United States Anti-Doping Agency has granted Lance Armstrong a 30-day extension to answer the organization’s charges that he used performance-enhancing drugs and blood transfusions while winning seven Tour de France titles.

The extension comes one day after the champion cyclist re-filed a lawsuit against the anti-doping agency in federal court to stop it from imposing a deadline of this Saturday to either accept the charges and face a lifetime ban and the loss of his titles, or reject them and enter into arbitration.

Armstrong’s lawsuit claims he has been denied due process.  His attorney, Tim Herman, says the extension will give the court “sufficient time” to review the cyclist's complaint.

The USADA said in a statement it granted the extension “until the court dismisses the lawsuit or rules on any preliminary injunction.”

The agency statement continued, “USADA believes this lawsuit like previous lawsuits aimed at concealing the truth is without merit and is confident the court will continue to uphold the established rules which are compliant with federal law and were approved by athletes, the U.S. Olympic Committee, and all Olympic sports organizations.”

Two doctors and a trainer associated with Armstrong received lifetime bans this week for their role in what the agency said was a “doping conspiracy.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May152012

Roger Clemens' Former Trainer Faces Grilling by Defense

Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Roger Clemens' former strength coach will take the stand again on Tuesday in the government's perjury trial against the former major league pitcher.

Clemens is accused of lying to Congress in 2008 about his use of performance enhancing drugs.  The seven-time Cy Young Award winner was indicted in August 2010 on six counts of obstruction of Congress, perjury and false statements.

During his first day of testimony, Brian McNamee contradicted what Clemens told Congress, detailing to jurors the first time he injected the pitcher with steroids in the spring of 1998.

“Roger pulled down his pants, exposing his right buttocks," McNamee told the Washington, D.C., courtroom on Monday.  "He bent his leg and started to flex his butt and said, ‘I'm ready.  Just make sure there's no air bubbles in it, right?’”

“I injected him and plunged the fluid into his buttocks,” McNamee said.  “It looked like it was a clean strike.”

The trainer went on to say that he injected Clemens eight to 10 more times that season.

On Tuesday, McNamee will continue his testimony, and will likely be due for an intense grilling when it comes time for cross-examination.

The lead defense attorney intends to portray the former strength coach as a liar -- an alcohol abuser who betrayed his boss for money and fame, and to escape criminal charges.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
May142012

Roger Clemens' Trainer to Testify at Former Pitcher's Trial

Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The government's key witness in its trial against former major league pitcher Roger Clemens, who's accused of lying to Congress about his use of performance enhancing drugs, will testify Monday in a Washington, D.C. courtroom.

Clemens' former trainer Brian McNamee is expected to take the stand and say he injected the seven-time Cy Young Award winner with  steroids and human growth hormones.  McNamee saved the bloody gauze pads and needles he claims to have used on the pitcher.

Clemens has stated that the injections he received from McNamee were vitamin b12 and lidocaine.

Prosecutors intend to use McNamee's testimony and the evidence to prove Clemens lied to Congress.

The former pitcher was indicted in August 2010 on charges of obstruction of Congress, perjury and false statements.  He is accused of making the false statements to congressional investigators in a Feb. 5, 2008 deposition.  The perjury charges, meanwhile, arose from his Feb. 13, 2008, testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Clemens insists he did not lie under oath.  His lawyers say McNamee is a liar and his evidence is tainted.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Apr232012

Opening Statements to Begin in Roger Clemens Retrial?

Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Opening statements could begin Monday in a Washington, D.C. courtroom for the retrial of former major league pitcher Roger Clemens.

Jury selection is expected to be finalized in the morning, after which opening arguments can begin.

Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, is on trial again for allegedly lying to Congress about his use of performance enhancing drugs, specifically steroids and human growth hormone (HGH).

The former pitcher was indicted in August 2010 on charges of obstruction of Congress, perjury and false statements.  He is accused of making the false statements to congressional investigators in a Feb. 5, 2008 deposition.  The perjury charges, meanwhile, arose from his Feb. 13, 2008, testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

A mistrial was declared in the case last July after two days of testimony, when prosecutors included portions of Clemens’ February 2008 congressional testimony that referenced conversations former Yankee teammate Andy Pettitte had with his wife, Laura Pettitte, about the use of HGH. The judge presiding over the trial had barred the prosecutors from referencing Pettitte’s wife before the jury.

During the retrial, Clemens’ lawyers are expected to try to create doubt about the government’s evidence. 

Defense attorney Rusty Hardin will likely question the credibility of Brian McNamee, Clemens' former trainer and the government’s star witness in the case.  Hardin is likely to raise questions about how McNamee kept the syringes and gauze pads he allegedly used to inject Clemens with performance enhancing drugs before providing them to government investigators. 

Clemens has stated that the injections he received from McNamee were vitamin b12 and lidocaine. 

The trial is expected to last six weeks.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
May232011

Lance Armstrong Doping Investigation Widens

Morne de Klerk/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A federal investigation into Lance Armstrong and doping in cycling continues to expand, as now a second and a third teammate are reportedly telling investigators that the seven-time Tour de France champion used performance enhancing drugs during his reign at the top of the cycling world.

Tyler Hamilton, a close friend and U.S. Postal Service teammate of Armstrong's, told CBS 60 Minutes in a report that aired Sunday night the same thing that he says he told a federal grand jury -- that he saw Armstrong use a variety of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) when they raced.

The statements from Hamilton, who rode with Armstrong from 1999 to 2001, match the story that another former Armstrong teammate, Floyd Landis, told ABC News in an exclusive interview last year. It was Landis who first put authorities on the trail of Armstrong.

Armstrong is under federal investigation by the U.S. Attorney's Office in Los Angeles, which is looking into whether the cyclist, once one of the world's most-revered professional athletes, committed fraud by allegedly taking illegal or banned drugs to win races for the U.S. Postal Service team.

The case against Armstrong is now no longer just about whether he as an individual used drugs to win the Tour de France, but whether there was a team-wide doping program, an offense that could lead to fraud and conspiracy charges.

Lance Armstrong and his lawyer both have categorically denied that he has ever cheated. 

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio