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Entries in Phillip Garrido (10)

Friday
Aug242012

Changes Made by Calif. Parole System Since Jaycee Dugard Told Her Story

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) -- The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, which was heavily criticized for failing to find Jaycee Dugard living in convicted sex offender Phillip Garrido’s backyard for 18 years, says it has improved its supervision of sex offenders since ABC News first aired Diane Sawyer’s interview with Dugard in July 2011.

The changes include:

  • Polygraph Testing, Face-to-Face Evaluations: The CDCR is adding polygraph testing and, when possible, “stringent face-to-face evaluations” by mental health therapists who assess whether sex offenders are classified as low-risk or high-risk. Experts had criticized the CDCR for classifying Garrido -- who was a convicted sex offender before he kidnapped Dugard -- as low-risk.
  • Full-Time GPS Tracking for All Sex Offenders: Some sex offenders, including Garrido, were once only randomly tracked through GPS devices. “Now, the daily tracks of all sex offenders, regardless of their risk level, are carefully and regularly analyzed,” the CDCR said in a statement.
  • Immediate Response to GPS Malfunctions: In the past, when batteries on GPS devices ran low or sex offenders became invisible on the GPS grid, parole agents were notified through email alerts. “Now humans actively oversee a GPS monitoring center 24 hours a day,” the department said in its statement. “If something seems amiss, they can contact the sex offenders and their agents directly and immediately.”
  • Drug Testing and Therapy: The CDCR is also insisting on increased drug testing and regular mental health therapy as conditions of parole for sex-offenders who need it.

Watch a special presentation of Diane Sawyer’s riveting interview with Dugard FRIDAY NIGHT at 9 p.m. ET on 20/20.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Aug022011

Phillip Garrido's Release Spurs California DA to Seek Parole Changes

El Dorado County Sheriff via Getty Images(EL DORADO COUNTY, Calif.) -- Vern Pierson, the California DA who put away Phillip Garrido for abducting and raping Jaycee Dugard, released two videos Tuesday that show in chilling detail how Garrido and his wife went about luring young girls into their twisted orbit. The videos, he says, demonstrate why the laws need to be changed to keep violent felons from getting out of jail too soon.

One video is of Nancy Garrido, Phillip Garrido's wife, coaxing a young girl to do gymnastics in the couple's van. Nancy is filming the girl, and the purpose of the video is to show it to Phillip Garrido for his gratification.

"That's it. Can you go all the way down?" Nancy Garrido is heard telling a little girl lured into the van where a camera was set up to record her.

When the girl says she can go down farther, Nancy Garrido coaxes, "Let me see, I bet you can go down really easy."

With the girl eager to show off, Nancy Garrido gets her to do more.

"You didn't show me your split, did you? Let me see it now," she says in a sweet voice.

At one point the girl notices the camera recording her and asks about the light on the camera. "Oh, I don't know anything about that camera. You know what I got?" Nancy Garrido chirps, quickly changing the subject.

The second video is of Nancy Garrido being interrogated by an investigator from the El Dorado County Sherriff's Department about how many times she has done this. The answer: between 10 and 20 times.

Pierson, who is District Attorney for El Dorado County, said he is upset that Phillip Garrido got out of jail after serving only 11 years of a 50-year sentence for a previous kidnapping and rape. That left him free to kidnap Dugard.

But Pierson said a big issue in the Garrido case was an "overreliance upon psychiatric professionals who were all too willing to listen to what Phillip Garrido was telling them and ignore the documented evidence that overwhelmingly established that he is a sexual predator."

Something very bad has happened to the law in the state of California regarding parole, Pierson said.

"Since 2008, when the State Parole Board is deciding whether to release an offender, they don't look at the initial crime the offender committed. Instead they look at how he or she has been coping in jail and the predictions provided by psychologists and psychiatrists about the offender's danger to the community."

Pierson wants the parole board to look at the seriousness of the initial offense when trying to determine whether to release someone on parole.

He released a report Tuesday with findings concerning the facts and circumstances of the Jaycee Dugard case. Garrido was convicted of kidnapping and raping Dugard, holding her for 18 years. Despite his record of violent crimes Garrido is still considered by the state to be a "moderate to low risk for reoffending."

Pierson is working with State Sen. Ted Gaines, a Republican, to change the existing law. They are working on a new bill to introduce to the legislature next week which would permit parole boards to look at the seriousness of the committing offense in parole decisions.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jul092011

Meet the Probation Officer Who Confirmed Early Termination of Phillip Garrido's Parole

El Dorado County Sheriff's Office/Getty Images(NOVATO, Calif.) -- They are words of courtesy and encouragement that have come back to haunt Mark Messner: "I hope that you will continue to do well. If there is anything we can help you with in the future, do not hesitate to contact our office."

Messner, a senior U.S. probation officer who works for the California's northern district probation office, included those sentences in a May 17, 1999 letter to Phillip Garrido, the man later convicted of kidnapping, raping and holding Jaycee Dugard captive for 18 years.

Garrido had kidnapped Dugard in 1991, when she was 11 years old, and went on to father two children with her. At the time of the kidnapping, Garrido had already had a violent sexual history. In 1977, he kidnapped and raped a woman named Katie Callaway Hall in Nevada.

For that crime, Garrido received a 50-year federal sentence. But he would see only 11 years of jail time before the federal government paroled Garrido and then released him to authorities in Nevada, where he briefly served a state prison sentence for his rape of Hall. After serving that sentence, he moved to California and served the remainder of his federal parole term.

Messner was one of the federal probation officers assigned to supervise Garrido's parole between January 1988 and March 1999, when the U.S. probation service decided to terminate Garrido's federal parole, leaving his supervision up to state authorities.

In his 1999 letter, Messner confirmed Garrido's "early termination" from federal parole and thanked him for his "cooperation."

Authorities in Nevada briefly took over supervision of his parole in 1999 before the responsibility was transferred to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation under the terms of an interstate parole compact. Like officers with the U.S. Parole Commission, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation parole officers also went years without discovering Garrido's latest crimes.

ABC News called Messner and asked him to talk to us about why the federal parole service failed to detect Jaycee Dugard and her children living at Garido's house. Both Messner and his supervisor said the U.S. Parole Commission had prohibited them from discussing the case.

"20/20" anchor Chris Cuomo caught up with Messner as he was returning to his home in Novato, Calif. Cuomo tried to ask him about the Garrido case, but Messner refused to get out of his car and drove off.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jul082011

Exclusive: Jaycee Dugard Describes Giving Birth in Backyard Prison

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- For the first time ever, Jaycee Dugard, the California woman kidnapped and imprisoned for nearly two decades, is describing giving the birth at the age of 14 in a backyard prison.

Three years into her captivity, Dugard went into labor with the first of her daughters fathered by her abductor, Phillip Garrido.  She was locked in a room in Garrido's backyard compound when she began having pains.

"I didn't know I was in labor," Dugard told ABC News' Diane Sawyer in an exclusive interview.  "I was still...locked at that time.  Just scared."

Dugard told Sawyer that she knew nothing about sex before being kidnapped at 11 years old by Phillip and Nancy Garrido in 1991.  She writes in her memoir, A Stolen Life, that the Garridos told her she was pregnant when she was 13 on a Sunday in 1994.  She knew she was putting on weight, but didn't know why.

She began watching videos about giving birth and worried because she knew there would be no doctor, just her kidnappers to help her.  She writes in her book that giving birth was the most painful experience of her life.

"And then I saw her.  She was beautiful.  I felt like I wasn't alone anymore.  [I] had somebody else who was mine.  I wasn't alone," Dugard said.

She gave birth again in 1997 to another little girl.  She educated her children, creating a school in the compound to teach them as much as she could with only a fifth grade education.  As time went on, Dugard said she learned to endure.

"There's a switch that I had to shut off," Dugard said.  "I don't know...I mean, I can't imagine being beaten to death, you know?  And you can't imagine being kidnapped and raped, you know?  So, it's just...you do what you have to do to survive," she said.

She also thought of her mom every day.

"I wanted to see her more than anything.  Any day near the beginning was...like, I said, I would cry every day.  And..[it'd] be hardest when I would think about her and what she was doing.  And then trying to convince myself she was better without me," Dugard said.

Dugard and her mother, Terry Probyn, were reunited after Jaycee was rescued in 2009.

Her mother never gave up the search for her daughter.  She'd replay the morning that her daughter disappeared, remembering she didn't kiss her goodbye as she left for work.  It was a moment both women recounted in their minds throughout their 18 years apart.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun172011

Jaycee Dugard Kidnapper in Same Prison Unit as Charles Manson

El Dorado County Sheriff via Getty Images(SACRAMENTO) -- Phillip Garrido, the man convicted of kidnapping, raping and holding Jaycee Dugard captive for 18 years, arrived at California’s Corcoran State Prison Thursday to begin serving a sentence of 431 years to life.

The 60-year-old Garrido, who was given the name “Creepy Phil” by his neighbors in the town of Antioch, will be housed in a protective unit that is also home to cult murderer Charles Manson.

“Creepy Phil” and “Crazy Charlie” are in a Protective Housing Unit for inmates whose safety, according to the California Department of Corrections, “would be endangered by general population placement.”

Phillip Garrido’s wife, Nancy Garrido, is now at a California women’s prison, serving a sentence of 36 years to life.

Jaycee Dugard was 11 years old in 1991 when the Garridos snatched her off the street and forced her to live in a backyard compound made of sheds and tents.  She was sexually assaulted by Garrido for years and gave birth to two daughters while in captivity.

Dugard was freed in August 2009.  She has a memoir due out next month.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jun022011

Garridos Sentenced to Life in Prison for Jaycee Dugard Abduction

El Dorado County Sheriff via Getty Images(PLACERVILLE, Calif.) -- The California couple who kidnapped then-11-year-old Jaycee Dugard from her home in 1991 and held her captive for 18 years was sentenced Thursday in a California courtroom.

The judge on Thursday sentenced Phillip Garrido, 60, to the maximum sentence of 431 years to life in prison, according to ABC News affiliate KABC-TV. His wife, Nancy, was sentenced to 36 years to life.

In a statement read in the courtroom by her mother, Terry Probyn, Dugard said, "I chose not to be here today because I refuse to waste another second of my life in your presence."

Phillip and Nancy Garrido pled guilty to various kidnapping and sexual assault charges on April 28.  They were arrested in August 2009, when Dugard, then 29 and living under an assumed name, accompanied Philip Garrido to a meeting with his parole officer.

Garrido had been called in to meet with his parole officer after acting suspiciously on the campus of the University of California-Berkeley.  Dugard brought along to the meeting two young children that Garrido had fathered with her.  Under questioning, she broke, dropping the façade Garrido had forced her to use for 18 years and admitted she had been kidnapped.

Investigators later uncovered a secret encampment guarded by a six-foot fence in the Garridos' backyard in which Dugard was kept captive.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jun022011

Couple Who Kidnapped Jaycee Dugard Being Sentenced

El Dorado County Sheriff via Getty ImagesUPDATE: The judge on Thursday sentenced Phillip Garrido, 60, to the maximum sentence of 431 years to life in prison, according to ABC News affiliate KABC-TV. His wife, Nancy, was sentenced to 36 years to life.

(PLACERVILLE, Calif.) -- The California couple who kidnapped then-11-year-old Jaycee Dugard from her home in 1991 and held her captive for 18 years will be sentenced Thursday in a California courtroom.

Phillip and Nancy Garrido pled guilty to various kidnapping and sexual assault charges on April 28.  They were arrested in August 2009, when Dugard, then 29 and living under an assumed name, accompanied Philip Garrido to a meeting with his parole officer.

Garrido had been called in to meet with his parole officer after acting suspiciously on the campus of the University of California-Berkeley.  Dugard brought along to the meeting two young children that Garrido had fathered with her.  Under questioning, she broke, dropping the façade Garrido had forced her to use for 18 years and admitted she had been kidnapped.

Investigators later uncovered a secret encampment guarded by a six-foot fence in the Garridos' backyard in which Dugard was kept captive.

Both Phillip and Nancy Garrido could be sentenced to life in prison.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Apr282011

Phillip, Nancy Garrido Plead Guilty to Jaycee Dugard Kidnapping

El Dorado County Sheriff via Getty Images(PLACERVILLE, Calif.) -- The California couple who kidnapped Jaycee Dugard in 1991 before holding her captive for 18 years pled guilty Thursday to various kidnapping and sexual assault charges.

Phillip Garrido pled guilty to kidnapping and to all sexual allegations against him, as well as to all priors and enhancements. He faces a maximum sentence of 431 years to life in prison.

His wife, Nancy Garrido, pled guilty to kidnapping and one count of rape by force. The Sacramento Bee reported she was expected to serve just 31 years under a plea deal that was contingent upon her husband’s guilty plea.

"Were it not for Jaycee’s strong cooperation with our office and the prosecution of the Garridos, we would not have been able to firmly stand by our position to take this case to jury trial," said El Dorado County District Attorney Vern Pierson. "Jaycee’s courage and willingness to confront her abductors in court directly led to the Defendants’ plea and life sentences.”

Phillip and Nancy Garrido will be sentenced June 2.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Apr082011

Jaycee Dugard's Alleged Kidnapper Pleads Not Guilty

El Dorado County Sheriff via Getty Images(PLACERVILLE, Calif.) -- Phillip Garrido now says he's not guilty in the alleged kidnapping and rape of Jaycee Dugard when she was 11 years old.  Prosecutors maintain Garrido fathered Dugard's two children during the two decades they say she was his captive.

This development stunned the courtroom in Placerville, California Thursday after it was widely reported that Garrido would plead guilty.

He and his wife, Nancy Garrido, are accused of abducting Dugard from her South Lake Tahoe home in 1991 and keeping her prisoner until investigators discovered the alleged victim's whereabouts last summer.

Garrido's wife is separately awaiting her own trial, unless she gets a better deal from El Dorado County District Attorney Vern Pierson.

Dugard, now 30, has already said she would testify against Phillip and Nancy Garrido if the case went to trial.

The next hearing for the two suspects is scheduled in May, with a trial set for the Garridos on August 1.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Feb282011

Lawyer: Garridos Confess to Kidnapping Jaycee Dugard

File: Released kidnapping victim, Jaycee Dugard, on her way to the "Rose Parade" before her 1991 ordeal. Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(PLACERVILLE, Calif.) -- The California couple accused of kidnapping 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard and keeping her prisoner in their home for 18 years made "full confessions" to police, a defense attorney involved in the case said Monday.

Stephen Tapson, the lawyer representing Nancy Garrido, told reporters that she and her husband Phillip Garrido admitted last month to snatching the girl off the street near her home in South Lake Tahoe in 1991. The lawyer described the admission as "full confessions."

Despite the alleged confession, Nancy Garrido, 55, hasn't changed her plea. She pleaded not guilty last November to 18 felony counts that include false imprisonment, rape and child pornography.

Phillip Garrido was due to enter a plea Monday, but his public defender asked that the arraignment be postponed to March 17. His lawyer Susan Gellman did not return calls for comment to confirm whether her client also confessed.

Tapson told reporters that Dugard was present during one of Nancy Garrido's interviews with police. That meeting was apparently the first time the two women had seen each other in person since the couple was arrested in 2009.

Nancy Seltzer, spokeswoman for Jaycee Dugard, would not confirm her client's presence at the interview or comment on Tapson's announcement.

Also Monday, the judge ruled that Phillip Garrido's psychological records could not be made public. Earlier this month he was ruled mentally competent to stand trial.

The Garridos were arrested in August 2009, when Jaycee, then 29 and living under an assumed name, accompanied Philip Garrido to a meeting with his parole officer. Garrido had been called in to meet with his parole officer after acting suspiciously on the campus of the University of California-Berkeley. Dugard brought along to the meeting two young children that Garrido had fathered with her. Under questioning she broke, dropping the façade Garrido had forced her to use for 18 years and admitted she had been kidnapped.

Investigators later uncovered a secret encampment guarded by a six-foot fence in the Garridos' backyard in which Dugard was kept captive.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio