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Entries in Red Cross (5)

Monday
May232011

How to Help Tornado Victims in Joplin, Missouri

Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock(JOPLIN, Mo.) -- Rescue efforts are underway as residents of Joplin, Mo., try to pick up the pieces of their lives after a devastating tornado hit the city of about 50,000, and severe storms ravaged the Midwest this weekend.

At least 89 people have been reported dead in Joplin. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon declared a state of emergency Sunday evening and activated the National Guard. Find out below how to help this city, 160 miles south of Kansas City.

Donate to the Tornado Relief Effort

To make a donation to the American Red Cross' Disaster Relief, visit its online donation page. You can also call 1-800-RED-CROSS or text "REDCROSS" to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

To donate to the United Way, visit its online donation page.

The Salvation Army's emergency disaster services teams are helping to feed residents and first responders in Joplin; Reading, Kan.; and parts of Minnesota affected by the storms. To donate to the The Salvation Army's efforts, visit www.salvationarmyusa.org and click on the donation page. You can call 1-800-SAL-ARMY and donors can text "GIVE" to 80888 to make a $10 donation.

To Help and Find Relatives

The American Red Cross' Safe and Well website helps friends and family connect with those in devastated areas.

On Facebook, several pages have been created to assist concerned relatives in finding loved ones and getting information on how to help: Help Joplin and Joplin, Mo., Tornado Recovery.

Missouri residents with medical skills who want to help, can go to ShowMeResponse.org.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
May092011

Memphis Flooding: How to Help Flood Victims

Scott Olson/Getty Images(MEMPHIS) -- Thousands of people from Arkansas to Tennessee are fleeing their homes ahead of recording-breaking flooding. The Mississippi River's record crest was 48.7 feet in 1937 and the Army Corps of Engineers expects the river to rise to 48 feet by early Tuesday morning. More than 1,300 homes are under an evacuation order and another 240 have been warned that they might need to leave. Nearly 400 people are staying in shelters. The damage has been extensive in places like Memphis where entire neighborhoods have been swallowed by the water and vehicles completely submerged.

Find out below how to help and donate to the flood relief effort:

American Red Cross: The Red Cross is providing shelter and supplies to those who have been hardest hit. They have more than 400 volunteers on the ground. To make a donation to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief, visit its online donation page. You can also call 1-800-RED-CROSS or text "REDCROSS" to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

United Way: The United Way is collecting donations to support local nonprofit programs that are working to provide immediate and long-term recovery in the Memphis and Mid-South area. To donate to the United Way, visit its online donation page.

The Salvation Army: The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services is responding to the floods and has opened three response stations in the Memphis area. The response stations provide hot food, snacks, drinks, hygiene, and baby supplies as well as emotional and spiritual support. To donate to the Salvation Army's flood relief efforts, visit www.salvationarmyusa.org, click on their donation page and designate "May Floods." You can call 1-800-SAL-ARMY and donors can text "GIVE" to 80888 to make a $10 donation. Checks can be made out to the Salvation Army Disaster Relief, P.O. Box 100339, Atlanta, Ga., 30384-0339.

Hope Presbyterian Church: Hope Presbyterian Church will serve as a donation and distribution hub, collecting donations to supply the shelters. Donations are accepted daily 7 a.m.-10 p.m. If you have any questions, please call (901) 755-7721. To make a donation to Hope Presbyterian Church, visit its online donation section located at the bottom of this page. All donated items must be new and in original packaging. At the request of the shelters, please only bring items from the list below:

Towels and washcloths BIG NEED FOR WASHCLOTHS
Batteries - sizes: C,D, AA, AAA BIG NEED
Ear Plugs BIG NEED
Socks for kids and adults BIG NEED
Flip Flops (for the showers) BIG NEED
Shaving cream/gel BIG NEED
Wal-Mart or Target gift cards BIG NEED
Deodorant Men's/Women's BIG NEED
Shampoo/conditioner (unopened hotel bottles work great) BIG NEED
Hair Brushes
Combs (Wide & Regular Tooth)
Pony tail holders/Hair clips
Body lotion
Hand Sanitizer
Gatorade
Toothbrushes (individually packaged)
Toothpaste
Training/Toddler Toothpaste BIG NEED
Children's toothbrushes BIG NEED
Hair Gel BIG NEED
General first-aid (band-aids, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, TUMS, rubbing alcohol) BIG NEED FOR RUBBING ALCOHOL & PEROXIDE
Lip Balm BIG NEED
Diapers & Pull-Ups (all sizes) 0-3, 6, 2t, 3t, 4t, 5t
Baby/Child Medicine BIG NEED
Teething Medicine BIG NEED
Diaper Rash Cream BIG NEED
Travel size baby lotion & wash BIG NEED
Baby blankets
Baby food
Baby Oil BIG NEED
Baby spoons
Baby bottles
Baby pacifiers
Baby Shampoo/Lotion/Wash
Baby bottle brushes
Baby formula (No generics please: Carnation or Gerber "Good Start Gentle Plus")
Pedialyte
Vaseline (generic welcome) BIG NEED
Sanitary Pads/Tampons
Depends (NOT Adult Diapers) BIG NEED

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Apr292011

Obamas Survey Alabama Storm Damage, Offer Condolences to Victims

Pool Photo(TUSCALOOSA, Al.) -- President Obama and the first lady surveyed storm damage and met with families of victims Friday in Tuscaloosa, Ala., one of the cities hardest hit by this week's outbreak of tornadoes that have left more than 300 people dead across seven states.

Obama said he's "never seen devastation like this. It is heartbreaking."

In Alabama alone, at least 210 people were killed. Mississippi reported 32 fatalities, Tennessee had 34, Georgia at least 15, Virginia had five and Arkansas 13, authorities said. The count, which is already the greatest death toll from a tornado outbreak since 1974, is expected to rise.

The twisters leveled cities, leaving thousands homeless and more than 1 million people without power. The outages forced two nuclear plants offline and idled production lines at major plants for automakers Toyota and Mercedes and aerospace manufacturers Boeing and Northrop Grumman.

"In a matter of hours, these deadly tornadoes ... took mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, friends and neighbors, even entire communities," Obama said at the White House Thursday. "We can't control when or where a terrible storm may strike, but we can control how we respond to it."

The president declared Alabama a major disaster area, clearing the way for federal aid to help families who lost homes or businesses and local governments that sustained damage to public property.

Individual tornadoes usually do not stay on the ground for a very long time. But the National Severe Storms Laboratory says the area may have been hit by a rare single, long-ranging twister that formed in Mississippi and travelled 300 miles to batter Tuscaloosa, Birmingham, southwestern Tennessee, Georgia, Virginia and Kentucky.

If that is true, the twister would be one of the longest-lasting on record, rivaling a 1925 tornado that raged for 219 miles. Early estimates show the tornado was at least an EF4 as it blew through Tuscaloosa. Five other EF4 tornadoes struck across the region, according to the National Weather Service, including one with estimated winds of 175 mph that occurred in Catoosa County, Georgia, flattening the town of Ringgold and killing at least eight.

Official storm damage assessments indicate the strongest tornado, likely an EF5 with winds of 205 miles per hour, hit Smithville, Miss., Wednesday, leaving a three-mile-long path of destruction that left at least 14 dead and 40 injured.

In total, there were 211 reported tornadoes across 14 states between Wednesday and Thursday mornings, according to NOAA -- a new record for one storm system.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Apr292011

How to Help Victims Affected by Deadly Southern Storms, Tornadoes

Jessica McGowan/Getty Images(TUSCALOOSA, Ala.) -- Deadly tornadoes and thunderstorms ripped through the South Wednesday and early Thursday, devastating dozens of cities and killing more than 300 people across six states.

The majority of the deaths have been reported in Alabama, where 200-mile-per-hour winds swept homes off their foundations in one area.  President Obama pledged full federal government support for all those affected by the storms and signed a disaster declaration for Alabama to assist in recovery and clean-up efforts.

Here's how you can help and donate to the April 2011 tornado relief effort:

American Red Cross: The Red Cross is providing relief to people across the hardest-hit states, providing shelter, and relief to survivors. To make a donation to the American Red Cross Disaster Relief, visit its online donation page. You can also call 1-800-RED-CROSS or text "REDCROSS" to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

The Salvation Army: The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services is responding to the deadly tornado activity throughout the South, mobilizing feeding units and providing support to the victims. To donate to the Salvation Army's tornado disaster response, visit www.salvationarmyusa.org, click on their donation page and designate "April 2011 Tornado Outbreak." You can call 1-800-SAL-ARMY and donors can text "GIVE" to 80888 to make a $10 donation. Checks can be made out to the Salvation Army Disaster Relief, P.O. Box 100339, Atlanta, Ga., 30384-0339.

Alabama - Governor's Emergency Relief Fund: The Fund, part of the Alabama Governor's Office of Faith-Based and Community Initiatives, provides additional recovery assistance to Alabama residents who have exhausted all other coverage provided by relief organizations, government programs and insurance. To donate, visit their online donation page.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Mar122011

For Americans, Desperate Search for Family, Friends Missing in Japan

JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images(ATWATER, Calif.) -- With the TV on around the clock in her Atwater, Calif., home, Tokiko Harper is desperate for any sliver of news she can get about her 84-year-old sister Kazuyo Komatsu.

"I don't have much of a hope," she told ABC News, her voice cracking. "My sister is old and she was probably alone at that hour. I am afraid."

Harper is just one of the presumably hundreds of people in the United States who are seeking any information on family or friends now missing in Japan. The official death toll following Japan's huge 8.9 earthquake and ensuing tsunami Friday had reached 686 by Saturday afternoon and with thousands of people unaccounted for, that number was expected to rise.

The State Department's Consular Task Force alone has reported receiving "thousands" of inquiries, according to spokeswoman Julie Reside, who did not provide an exact number.

The United States Agency for International Development is sponsoring the travel of urban search and rescue teams from Fairfax, Va., and Los Angeles.

Google launched an online tool, called "Person Finder: 2011 Japan Earthquake," to help keep track of missing people. The Red Cross also has its own family locator web site, ICRC.org.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio