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Entries in Rielle Hunter (50)

Tuesday
Jun262012

Rielle Hunter Says She Doesn't Believe in Infidelity

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Rielle Hunter and John Edwards have ended their controversial affair after she released a tell-all memoir that contained negative comments about his marraige Elizabeth Edwards, who is now deceased after losing her battle to cancer.

Hunter said today that one reason they split up was because she was "no longer interested in hiding."  The former mistress dropped her bombshell during an interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America.

"We are a family, but as of the end of last week John Edwards and I are no longer a couple. Not at all," she said. When asked if she still loved Edwards, Hunter replied, "I do."

Stephanopoulos asked if Edwards still loved her and she said, "You have to ask him. I think he does. I mean I feel that he does."

The interview began with Stephanopoulos asking Hunter, who gave birth to a girl named Frances Quinn with Edwards, whether knowing what she knows now, would she do it all again.

"Would I do that again?" repeats Hunter almost incredulously. "No way. Absolutely not."

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Hunter's announcement came out the same day her revealing memoir What Really Happened: John Edwards, Our Daughter and Me was released.

The book revealed that Edwards had several mistresses before her, but it also angered people for her harsh criticism of Edwards' wife Elizabeth, who was dying of cancer at the time of their affair. Elizabeth Edwards has since died of the disease.

Hours after the GMA appearance Hunter sat down with the five female hosts on the ABC talk show The View where she insisted: "I'm a mom, I'm not a mistress," and "I'm not a big believer in infidelity."

Her comments got a very pointed reception on the show. Host Whoopi Goldberg asked Hunter how she could "trash a dead lady," referring to Elizabeth Edwards.

Hunter describes Elizabeth Edwards in her book as "crazy," and a "venomous" "witch on wheels" who is given to fits of "rage."

"I wrote the book to tell the truth," Hunter replied. "What I was told about their marriage along the way, my experience of that – I was truthful about."

Hunter was also asked if she didn't believe in infidelity how she could approach the former senator when they first met with, "You are so hot."

"I didn't feel that was a come-on," Hunter said, adding that the comment "just flew out of my mouth." Hunter said the couple has been worn down by the scrutiny and pressure brought on by their high profile affair that began while Edwards was running for the 2008 presidential nomination.

"For me, for my part in it, it's because I'm no longer interested in hiding, hiding our relationship," she said. "I don't know if you've noticed, but we've had a lot of media scrutiny. It's complicated and it's hard. It wears you down after a while."

Hunter, 48, wouldn't say whether one of them made the break.

"That's private. We decided together to end it. It's hard. It's painful," she said.

She rejected a suggestion that the relationship may have been a mistake.

"I know many things in the relationship were a mistake but I don't regret loving him," she said.

Hunter said that people should read the book before criticizing her.

"There is so much misinformation and distortion about this story and people form opinions without knowing what really happened," she said.

"The public persona of John Edwards and Elizabeth Edwards -- and me, for that matter -- are so wrong. I think that it helps that we all are real humans and we all are not perfect," she said. "I don't think it serves the kids, including my own daughter, to have people that their father is a demon, when he's not, and that Elizabeth was a saint, because she wasn't, and that I'm a homewrecker. It doesn't serve anybody."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jun262012

Rielle Hunter and John Edwards Split Up

Courtesy of Rielle Hunter(NEW YORK) -- Rielle Hunter and John Edwards ended their controversial relationship last week, just days after her new book debuted and she went public about how they met, hid their affair and had a baby girl together.

"We are a family, but as of the end of last week John Edwards and I are no longer a couple.  Not at all," Hunter told ABC's George Stephanopoulos on Good Morning America.

When asked if she still loved Edwards, Hunter replied, "I do."

Stephanopoulos asked if Edwards still loved her and she said, "You have to ask him.  I think he does."

Nevertheless, the couple split, she said, worn down by the scrutiny and pressure brought on by their high profile affair that began while Edwards was running for the 2008 presidential nomination.

"For me, for my part in it, it's because I'm no longer interested in hiding, hiding our relationship, not living out," she said.  "I don't know if you've noticed, but we've had a lot of media scrutiny.  It's complicated and it's hard.  It wears you down after a while."

Hunter wouldn't say whether one of them made the break.

"That's private.  We decided together to end it.  It's hard.  It's painful," she said.

The interview began with Stephanopoulos asking Hunter, who has a baby girl named Frances Quinn with Edwards, whether knowing what she knows now, would she do it all again.

"Would I do that again?" repeats Hunter almost incredulously.  "No way.  Absolutely not."

The break-up came after the publication of Hunter's revealing memoir What Really Happened: John Edwards, Our Daughter and Me.  The book revealed that Edwards had several mistresses before her, but it also angered people for her harsh criticism of Edwards' wife Elizabeth, who was dying of cancer at the time of their affair.  Elizabeth Edwards has since died of the disease.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Jun202012

Rielle Hunter: No Regrets About Following Her Heart

ABC/ PHIL ELLSWORTH(NEW YORK) -- Some see her as the woman who brought down former presidential candidate John Edwards, but Rielle Hunter, who in 2008 gave birth to Edwards’ daughter Quinn, told ABC News 20/20 anchor Chris Cuomo that she is something very different.

“First and foremost, I’m a mom,” she said in an exclusive interview Cuomo, which will air this Friday.  “And I’m also a woman who fell in love with a married man. I’m not the first woman who has done that and I’m not going to be the last.”

Hunter has penned a revealing memoir with many new revelations about her relationship with Edwards. What Really Happened: John Edwards, Our Daughter and Me, to be published June 26, details how she got caught up in one of the biggest political scandals in recent history, the status of her relationship with Edwards and his involvement in the life of their now 4-year-old daughter.

People magazine obtained exclusive excerpts from the book, including Hunter’s description of how Edwards’ wife, Elizabeth Edwards, reacted after learning of the affair:

“Elizabeth requested all the tapes (I’d made of the campaign). She locked herself in a room to watch,” Hunter wrote. “On one tape she saw Johnny walking into a room and his reaction to seeing me. She apparently told him that he never once looked at her the way he looked at me. So she took that bit and put it on her computer as a screen saver in order to watch it over and over again.”

Last month Edwards was acquitted on charges of accepting illegal campaign contributions from a supporter. The Justice Department will not retry the case.

As for her and John Edwards?

“I’m still in love with John,” Hunter wrote. “That didn’t’ go away, shockingly enough. Marriage? I have no idea. I’m not a big fan of the institution, but never say never.”

In the end, Hunter says she has regrets, but not about following her heart because she has her daughter Quinn, whom she calls the love of her life.

Watch Chris Cuomo’s exclusive interview on ABC’s 20/20 Friday at 10 p.m. ET

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jun182012

Rielle Hunter Reveals John Edwards' Multiple Mistresses in Tell-All Book

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Although Rielle Hunter was John Edwards' last mistress, she was not his first or only one, Hunter claims in a revealing tell-all memoir obtained by ABC News.

In her book, What Really Happened, set to hit stores on June 26, Hunter discloses that Edwards had affairs with at least two other women dating back 20 years, and did not reveal the truth until 2011, two years after Hunter appeared before a grand jury.

Ironically, when Edwards first met Hunter in 2006 he lied to her about having more mistresses -- not fewer -- and only revealed the truth about his relationships years later, when he was set to be tried for using donations from wealthy political supporters to cover up his illicit affair and the daughter he had with Hunter.

Edwards last month was acquitted on one count of violating campaign finance rules and a federal judge declared a mistrial on five other criminal counts after the jury came back deadlocked.  The Justice Department will not retry the case.

In the book, Hunter is vague about the current status of her relationship with Edwards, but suggests that they remain romantically involved and he is a presence in daughter Frances Quinn Hunter's life.

"I really have no idea what will happen with us.  The jury is still out.  But I can honestly say that the ending is of no concern to me anymore.  The love is here.  And as sappy as it may sound, I love living in love," she writes.

Hunter says she was driven to write the book because she wants daughter Frances Quinn to "have one entirely truthful public account of how she came into the world.  After all, this is her story too."

The book is a primer on the life of a political mistress -- long waits in hotel bars and furtive dinners over take-out, punctuated by short passionate trysts and the anxiety of being hounded by the paparazzi.

It is additionally both a full throated defense of Edwards' innocence and at times a screed against Edwards' wife Elizabeth, whom Hunter routinely describes as "crazy" and blames for driving Edwards into the arms of other women.

Tune in to 20/20 on Friday, June 22, to watch ABC News' Chris Cuomo's exclusive interview with Rielle Hunter.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May292012

Is John Edwards Flirting with Disaster?

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images(GREENSBORO, N.C.) -- Jurors in John Edwards' campaign corruption trial get back to work Tuesday in an attempt to arrive at verdicts on six charges that could potentially put the former North Carolina senator and candidate for the 2008 Democratic presidential candidate behind bars for 30 years.

Meanwhile, the judge in the case is also expected to address an "undisclosed jury issue" that may have to do with an alternate juror giving Edwards what's known as the "hairy eyeball."

ABC News reported late last week that the alternate, who's described as an attractive woman with jet-black hair, has been flirting with the defendant in the courtroom.

She supposedly smiled, giggled and blushed when looking at Edwards, who reportedly smiled back at her.

While Edwards' lawyers laughed at the obviousness of it, the flirting also didn't get past U.S. District Judge Catherine Eagles, who met with the attorneys after the session Friday and plans on another meeting with them Tuesday.

The entire matter is sort of unsettling, given that Edwards is on trial for supposedly trying to cover up an extramarital affair with campaign contributions.  His wife, Elizabeth Edwards, passed away in 2010 after battling breast cancer.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
May252012

Is John Edwards Flirting with a Female Juror?

Chris Hondros/Getty Images(GREENSBORO, N.C.) -- After a week of deliberations, the four alternate jurors have become the prime distraction for the assembled press corps and spectators in the courtroom.

On Thursday, the alternates -- three women and one man -- caused something of a stir when they showed up in matching bright yellow shirts, hardly bothering to suppress their snickering as the judge addressed the main panel of jurors.

For nearly four weeks, 16 jurors heard all the evidence in Edwards’ case.  After the closing arguments, Judge Catherine Eagles made the unorthodox decision to extend the service of the four alternate jurors, while the primary panel of 12 deliberated the six felony charges.  So, for the last five days of deliberations, the gang of four alternates has been required to show up at court each day, sent to a holding room with instructions to avoid talking about the case.

Since the alternates were identified last Thursday, it has been impossible to ignore the dynamic between Edwards and one of the female alternates, an attractive young woman with jet-black hair, who seems to have been flirting with Edwards for days.  She smiles at him; he smiles at her.  She giggles; he blushes.

The flirtation has become so obvious that even Edwards’ attorneys have to work to suppress their laughter at the absurdity of it all.

The jury returns on Friday to resume deliberations for a sixth day.  Edwards is accused of using nearly $1 million in campaign donations to hide his affair with his mistress Rielle Hunter.  If convicted, he could be sentenced to as much as 30 years in prison and fined as much as $1.5 million.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
May242012

John Edwards Jury Deliberations Move On to Second Donor's Cash

Steve Exum/Getty Images(GREENSBORO, N.C.) -- After nearly a week of deliberations jurors in the John Edwards trial have yet to reach a verdict, methodically working their way through six criminal charges and a month's worth of testimony about how the former presidential candidate allegedly used campaign donations to cover up a torrid illicit affair.

Jurors ended their fifth day of deliberations Thursday, after requesting exhibits concerning counts 4 and 5 of the indictment, both of which deal with funds from millionaire political donor Fred Baron that were used to help hide Edwards' mistress Rielle Hunter.

Among the evidence jurors are reviewing is a note Baron wrote to Edwards' aide Andrew Young, accompanying an envelope full of cash.

"Old Chinese saying: Use cash, not credit cards," read the note, which Baron wrote in December 2007, weeks before the Iowa caucuses.

The cash was sent to a Florida hotel, where Young was staying with Hunter to keep her out of view from an increasingly inquisitive press corp.

Jurors also requested Young's bank statement, in which he had received a $20,000 deposit from Baron and another $725,000 from another wealthy Edwards supporter, millionaire heiress Rachel "Bunny" Mellon.

Edwards is charged with six counts of violating federal campaign laws and was accused by the government of soliciting nearly $1 million from Baron and Mellon to finance a cover-up of his affair and illegitimate child while running for president in 2008.

For much of this week jurors focused on counts 2 and 3 of the indictment. Those charges all concerned donations Mellon made to aid the cover-up in 2007 and 2008.

Neither Baron nor Mellon testified in the case. Baron died in October 2008 of bone cancer. Mellon, who lives on a Virginia estate, is 101 years old and hard of hearing.

After doling out exhibits piecemeal as the jury requested them, Federal Judge Catherine Eagles Thursday gave the jury all the evidence in the case, a move that could help speed deliberations.

The jury has spent more than 25 hours deliberating since it was charged last Friday. They have taken breaks only for lunch.

Edwards was spotted earlier this week, pacing around a second-floor room of the courthouse, occasionally peering at the press gathered outside.

On Wednesday, he and daughter Cate attended a college baseball game in Greensboro, featuring the UNC Tarheels, his alma mater.

If convicted Edwards can face up to 30 years in prison and be fined more than $1 million, although it is unlikely he will face the most severe penalties.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May222012

John Edwards Jurors Make Little Progress in Three Days of Deliberations

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images(GREENSBORO, N.C.) -- The jury in the John Edwards mistress and money trial ended its third day of deliberations Tuesday after apparently making little progress, asking to review evidence that suggests they are still focused on just one or two of the six counts with which the former presidential candidate is charged.

The panel of eight men and four women has six felony charges to consider, each of which carries a maximum penalty of five years and a $250,000 fine. Edwards is accused of soliciting money from wealthy donors to conceal his mistress and love child during his 2008 bid for the White House.

For three days, observers have noted that jurors have requested evidence relating only to the second count, and perhaps the third, that deal specifically with money obtained from 101-year-old heiress and Edwards supporter Rachel "Bunny" Mellon.

Tuesday evening, after nearly 16 hours of deliberations, jurors asked for two more exhibits related to Mellon. One exhibit was a letter from her lawyer Alex Forger to Edwards' aide Andrew Young. The second was a letter from Mellon to Forger.

Forger first learned that Mellon was writing checks to Young in 2007 and became suspicious about for whom the money was really intended.

Edwards was spotted waiting out the jury's decision in a second floor room of the courthouse. Reporters have spotted him pacing the room, looking out the window.

The government alleges in count two of the indictment that Edwards and Young illegally solicited the money from Mellon as part of the effort to hide his pregnant mistress, Rielle Hunter, during the 2008 Democratic presidential primary campaign.

Jurors were charged by federal Judge Catherine Eagles last Friday to first consider counts two through six of the indictment and consider the first count, dealing with conspiracy, last.

The counts the jury will consider in order are as follows:

Count 2: Illegal Campaign Contributions

During 2007 John Edwards, while a candidate for federal office, knowingly and willfully accepted and received contributions from Mellon in excess of the $4,600 limits of the Election Act (Mellon's checks in 2007 totaled $525,000).

Count 3: Illegal Campaign Contributions

Same charge and wording as count two but for calendar year 2008 (Mellon wrote one check in 2008 for $200,000).

Count 4: Illegal Campaign Contributions

Same charge and wording as count 2 but related to excess contributions from backer Fred Baron in 2007 ($61,942 in flights and hotel bills for mistress Rielle Hunter, Andrew Young and his family).

Count 5: Illegal Campaign Contributions

Same charge and wording as count two but related to contributions from Baron in 2008 ($131,143 in flights, hotel bills, home rental for the Youngs and Hunter -- the total also includes $10,000 in cash).

Count 6: False Statements

Edwards concealed from the John Edwards for President Committee hundreds of thousands of dollars from Mellon and Baron causing the committee to file FEC reports which failed to disclose those contributions

Count 1: Conspiracy

Edwards conspired with others to accept and receive excess contributions from Mellon and Baron. Edwards also concealed material facts from the John Edwards for President Committee causing the committee to file false and misleading campaign finance reports.

The jury will soon likely turn from contributions donated by Mellon to those given by Baron, before ultimately considering the conspiracy charge.

At the end of the day on Monday, the jurors informed the judge that they'd prefer to keep to a set schedule for deliberations, starting each day at 9:30 a.m. and calling it quits by about 4 p.m. The Middle District of North Carolina covers 24 counties and several of the jurors have long commutes to court each day.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
May212012

John Edwards Jury Stuck on 'Bunny' Money, No Verdict Yet

SKETCH BY CHRISTINE CORNELL(GREENSBORO, N.C.) -- The jury in John Edwards' campaign finance trial ended its second day of deliberations Monday requesting to review additional evidence, but not indicating they are any closer to reaching a verdict.

The panel of eight men and four women spent the day Monday focusing discussions on one count of the indictment dealing specifically with money obtained from 101-yeard-old heiress and Edwards supporter, Rachel "Bunny" Mellon.

Monday marked the second day, since they were charged Friday, that jurors sent a note to Judge Catherine Eagles, requesting a number of trial exhibits related to funds Edwards and his associates received from Mellon in 2007.

The government alleges in count two of a six-count indictment that Edwards and his former aide Andrew Young illegally solicited the money from Mellon as part of the effort to hide his pregnant mistress, Rielle Hunter, during the 2008 Democratic presidential primary campaign. Count three of the indictment contains similar allegations, but is focused on checks Mellon wrote in January 2008, shortly before Edwards ended his quest for the nomination.

Among the exhibits the jury requested is a letter Mellon wrote in April 2007 that is sometimes referred to as the "haircut" letter. Mellon wrote the letter to Young, shortly after the press had seized on the news that Edwards had charged a $400 haircut to his campaign.

"I was sitting alone in a grim mood -- furious that the press had attacked Sen. Edwards on the price of a hair cut," Mellon's handwritten note reads. "From now on, all hair cuts, etc., that are a necessary and important part of his campaign, please send the bills to me. It is a way to help our friend without government restrictions."

Within six weeks of that letter Mellon began writing a series of personal checks that would eventually add up to $725,000 over seven months. The jury also requested copies of the first two of those two checks, which were funneled to Andrew Young through an intermediary and eventually deposited in an account in the maiden name of Young's wife, Cheri.

Edwards' defense team has argued that Young was taking advantage of Mellon, bilking her out of the money with the pretense that it was for Edwards. They noted that the vast majority of Mellon's money went to Young and his wife, who used much of it to fund the construction of their $1.6 million home.

After the jury's request on Friday, an Edwards lawyer told a clutch of reporters in the courtroom that the deliberations could take a while. The jury appears, at least at the outset, to be taking a meticulous, count-by-count approach to their discussions.

Edwards is charged with conspiracy, accepting illegal campaign contributions and making false statements. If convicted on all six counts, he faces a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison and $1.5 million in fines. Practically speaking, any prison term is likely to be well below the maximum.

In addition to the money sent by Mellon, the jury must also consider the support provided to Hunter by Edwards' campaign finance chairman, Fred Baron, who funded a cross-country luxury odyssey for Hunter and the Youngs, after Andrew Young falsely claimed paternity of Edwards' child.

And they also must consider the broader question of whether the financial support provided by Mellon and Baron constitutes an illegal contribution under federal election laws.

At the close of the day the jurors informed the judge that they'd prefer to keep to a set schedule for deliberations, starting each day at 9:30 a.m. and calling it quits by about 4 p.m. The Middle District of North Carolina covers 24 counties and several of the jurors have long commutes to court each day.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
May212012

John Edwards Jury Looking at 'Bunny' Money as Deliberations Continue

Sara D. Davis/Getty Images(GREENSBORO, N.C.) -- The jury in John Edwards' campaign finance trial begins its second day of deliberations Monday morning in Greensboro, N.C.

The panel of eight men and four women spent about five hours behind closed doors on Friday as they began to weigh the evidence presented over nearly four weeks of testimony.

Shortly after they retired to the jury room on Friday, the jurors sent out a note to Judge Catherine Eagles, requesting a number of trial exhibits related to money provided by Virginia heiress Rachel "Bunny" Mellon in 2007.

The government alleges in count two of a six-count indictment that Edwards and his former aide Andrew Young illegally solicited hundreds of thousands of dollars from Mellon as part of the effort to hide his pregnant mistress, Rielle Hunter, during the 2008 Democratic presidential primary campaign.  Count three of the indictment contains similar allegations, but is focused on checks Mellon wrote in January 2008, shortly before Edwards ended his quest for the nomination.

Among the exhibits the jury requested is a letter Mellon wrote in April 2007 that is sometimes referred to as the "haircut" letter.  Mellon wrote the letter to Young, shortly after the press had seized on the news that Edwards had charged a $400 haircut to his campaign.

"I was sitting alone in a grim mood -- furious that the press had attacked Sen. Edwards on the price of a hair cut," Mellon's handwritten note reads.  "From now on, all hair cuts, etc., that are a necessary and important part of his campaign, please send the bills to me.  It is a way to help our friend without government restrictions."

Within six weeks of that letter, Mellon began writing a series of personal checks that would eventually add up to $725,000 over seven months.  The jury also requested copies of the first two of those checks, which were funnelled to Young through an intermediary and eventually deposited in an account in the maiden name of Young's wife, Cheri.

Edwards' defense team has argued that Young was taking advantage of Mellon, bilking her out of the money with the pretense that it was for Edwards.  They noted that the vast majority of Mellon's money went to Young and his wife, who used much of it to fund the construction of their $1.6 million home.

After the jury's request on Friday, an Edwards lawyer told a clutch of reporters in the courtroom that the deliberations could take a while.  The jury appears, at least at the outset, to be taking a meticulous, count-by-count approach to their discussions.

Edwards is charged with conspiracy, accepting illegal campaign contributions and making false statements.  If convicted on all six counts, he faces a maximum penalty of 30 years in prison and $1.5 million in fines.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







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