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Entries in SEAL Team 6 (4)

Saturday
Mar302013

Navy SEAL Killed in Freefall Training Was Member of Seal Team Six

U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Eric S. Logsdon(WASHINGTON) --The Navy SEAL killed in a parachute training accident was identified in a Navy press release Saturday morning.

Navy officials identified the deceased as Brett "Shady" Shadle, 31. Shadle had been a member of SEAL Team Six, the most elite of the SEAL teams and the one tasked with the historic May 2011 raid that killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

Shadle was "one of the best," a former colleague in the elite unit told ABC News.

"Both tactically on the battlefield and at home, he was one of the best SEALs I've ever worked with," said an ex-SEAL Team Six member who served with Shadle for years. "His reputation was that of a great operator, a true friend and a nice guy."

Shadle, a 31-year-old Pennsylvania native, was one of two SEAL Team Six members involved in a serious accident during routine freefall training in Arizona Thursday. Both SEALs were taken to a nearby hospital where Shadle succumbed to his injuries, according to officials. The other SEAL is in stable condition, the Navy said.

"[Shadle] should be remembered as a hero, a father, a friend and an American," Shadle's former SEAL colleague said. "He sacrificed everything for his country."

The second SEAL, who was not identified, remained in stable condition according to the Navy press release. The accident is under further investigation.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Nov082012

Seven Members of Navy’s Seal Team Six Disciplined for Work on Video Game

John Moore/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Seven current members of the Navy’s elite SEAL Team Six, including one involved in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden, have received non-judicial punishments for having served as paid consultants for the video game Medal of Honor: Warfighter.  Four other SEALs who previously belonged to the unit remain under investigation.

The newly released game by Electronic Arts features special operations forces, including SEALs, in combat situations.  Promotional materials for the game mention the fact that, to make the game as realistic as possible, input came from special operators, including Navy SEALS.

A Navy official says 11 active duty SEALS worked as consultants on the game over two days earlier this year.  At the time all of them were members of SEAL Team Six.

A senior Navy official told ABC News that one of the seven SEALs was involved in the May 1, 2011,  raid in Pakistan that killed Osama bin Laden.

The SEALs were punished for having violated their nondisclosure agreements and for having revealed tactics, techniques and procedures. Non-judicial punishments allow commanders to discipline service members administratively instead of pursuing a legal process that could lead to a court martial.

The news that active duty SEALS had been punished for their involvement with the video game was first reported by CBS News.

The official confirmed that on Thursday morning seven senior enlisted sailors, who are still part of the unit, had received letters of reprimand and been fined two months’ pay.  Letters of reprimand are seen as career-enders because they typically prevent further promotions.  The investigation continues into the four West Coast based SEALs who were part of the unit at the time that they served as consultants.

A Defense official said that in an unusual move, the punishments were read out loud to the seven SEALs in front of their peers to send the message that this kind of activity would not be tolerated.

In a statement, Rear Adm. Garry Bonelli, deputy commander of Naval Special Warfare Command, said his command, “takes all allegations of misconduct seriously and conducts investigations to determine the facts. We likewise take seriously the Non-Disclosure Agreements signed by Sailors and adherence to the articles of the Uniformed Code of Military Justice (UCMJ).”

The Navy first became aware of the SEALs’ involvement following the release of the book No Easy Day, written by the pseudonym Mark Owen, a former SEAL Team Six member who detailed his role in the bin Laden raid.

Owen was investigated by the Pentagon for having violated his non-disclosure agreements and for not having his book vetted by the Pentagon. He too served as a consultant on the Medal of Honor video game.

The Navy official said the participation by the 11 SEALs was discovered following a review prompted by the publication of Owen’s book.  The official said after the book came out, it was decided that a review should be made of what “outside engagements” current SEALs might have been involved with for which they may have received compensation.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Oct102012

Satellite Images Appear to Show US Bin Laden Op Training Ground

AAMIR QURESHI/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- A civilian satellite captured what appear to be clear, overhead images of the North Carolina mock-up of Osama bin Laden’s compound used by SEAL Team Six to train for the top secret mission to take out the al Qaeda leader.

The images, posted on several satellite imaging websites as well on the map function for the search engine Bing, show what looks like a brand new, mostly open-air building complex in the rural town in North Carolina that is strikingly similar to the layout of Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan.

One satellite imaging website, TerraServer, provides DigitalGlobe images from different dates, apparently showing that the building was constructed sometime after Jan. 14, 2011, as reported at the anti-secrecy website Cryptome.org Tuesday. While one image reportedly taken from Feb. 15 shows several vehicles at the complex as well as what appears to be a construction crane, another from just two months later, April 30, shows no vehicles at all and the complex apparently abandoned.

[See Images of the Training Compound HERE]

The next day, President Obama announced that Osama bin Laden had been killed in a daring raid by American troops.

The final available satellite image of the compound, from November 2011, shows it has been completely leveled.

The book No Easy Day, which was written by a former Navy SEAL on the mission under the pseudonym Mark Owen, revealed that the elite team repeatedly practiced overtaking bin Laden’s home at a look-a-like complex in North Carolina.

“Nestled in a remote part of the base, the practice compound was built to scale using plywood, chain-link fence, and shipping containers,” Owen writes. “The level of detail on the mock-up was impressive. The construction crews at the base had planted trees, dug a ditch around the compound, and even put in mounded dirt to simulate the potato fields that surround the compound in Pakistan … The construction crew didn’t ask why and never said no.”

The CIA, which led the intelligence side of the bin Laden mission, declined to comment and the Department of Defense did not immediately respond to requests for comment for this report.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Aug232012

SEAL’s Bin Laden Raid Book Stirs Controversy

John Moore/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The former Navy SEAL who penned a firsthand account of the mission to kill Osama bin Laden did so without the permission of the U.S. government, officials said, and is now at the center of an ongoing controversy within the secretive special operations community over unauthorized disclosures.

The author of the book, who writes under the pseudonym Mark Owen, was a SEAL Team Six team leader during the mission that took out the al Qaeda leader and was “one of the first men through the door on the third floor of the terrorist leader’s hideout,” according to a statement from the book’s publisher, Dutton. The book, No Easy Day, is set to be released next month on the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks.

But no U.S. officials – from the White House to the Department of Defense to the CIA – have reviewed the book’s account of the top secret mission for any possible breaches of national security, officials from the departments said.

The book’s announcement comes as the special operations community, especially the SEALs, have risen to the forefront of a discussion over the controversial leaking of classified information. Following the May 2011 raid that killed bin Laden, the Obama administration came under harsh criticism from Republican lawmakers for allegedly leaking too much about the mission for political gain.

Most recently, a small group of former special operations and intelligence officials — many with Republican ties — published an online video called “Dishonorable Disclosures” in which they say the president was trying to take credit for bin Laden’s death from the SEALs on the ground. That video was later reportedly criticized by others in the military as “unprofessional” and “shameful.”

Brandon Webb, a former Navy SEAL and writer, told ABC News that Owen may be compromising one of America’s most elite and secretive commando groups, even if he used a pseudonym and changed the names of the other team members.

“Operational security is at play here regardless of whether or not any classified information has been disclosed in this memoir,” he said, noting that even innocuous details could be enough to put other team members at risk. “This is not a good day for SEAL Team Six. An individual has compromised their ethos and mantra that the deed is more important than the glory.”

Webb said his own memoir, The Red Circle, was also not vetted by the Department of Defense but said it did not disclose any classified information, and that any potentially sensitive details about events described in the book, which occurred approximately 10 years ago, were changed.

Another former SEAL, who is still active in the intelligence community, said everyone needs to wait and see what’s actually in the new book before passing judgment.

“It seems pretty quick, but at the same time, I don’t know what he says in the book,” said the ex-SEAL, who requested not to be named for his own security. “This guy dedicated a majority of his life to the service of his country and he was on a historic mission. It’s his story to tell… It really comes down to what type of information he’s disclosing.”

Dutton said Owen plans to donate a majority of the proceeds from his book to charities that help the families of fallen Navy SEALs.

A White House-sanctioned Hollywood movie about the bin Laden raid is scheduled to be released in December.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio