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Entries in Sign (3)

Thursday
Dec152011

Exclusive: ‘White Only’ Pool Sign Owner Explains

A female landlord, Jamie Hein, had a sign that read, "Public Swimming Pool, White Only" hanging on a gate at her house and her private pool. (Photo credit: Ohio Civil Rights Commission)(NEW YORK) -- An Ohio landlord accused of discriminating against an African-American girl with a “white only” sign at her swimming pool told ABC News that the sign was an antique and a decoration.

“I’m not a bad person,” said Jamie Hein of Cincinnati. “I don’t have any problem with race at all. It’s a historical sign.”

The sign in question reads, “Public Swimming Pool, White Only.” It is dated 1931 and from Alabama.

Hein, 31, was unapologetic about the racist origins of the sign that she displayed at the entrance to her pool. She said she collects antiques and was given the sign as a gift. She also said that even though the sign seems to indicate that the pool is public, the pool is on her private property and “everybody has to ask before getting in my pool.”

Michael Gunn, 40, is the man who took issue with Hein’s sign and filed a discrimination charge with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission. He was a tenant in one of Hein’s properties.

“We invited my daughter, who is African-American, to visit and swim in the pool for the Memorial Day weekend,” Gunn wrote in his complaint. “The owner, Jamie Hein, accused my daughter of making the pool ‘cloudy’ because she used chemicals in her hair. Days later, she posted a sign on the gate to the pool which reads, ‘Public Swimming Pool, White Only.’”

Hein said that the sign had nothing to do with Gunn’s daughter and that it was already up at the time of that party, but cannot be seen when the gate is open.

Gunn said the family previously, “had unrestricted access to the pool area,” but Hein said that was not the case. She said everyone, including her own father, has to ask permission before swimming in her pool.

Gunn did not respond to requests for comment. In his complaint, he wrote that he moved out of Hein’s property in June “in order to not expose my daughter to the sign and the humiliation of the message.”

The Ohio Civil Rights Commission found on Sept. 29 that Hein did violate the Ohio Civil Rights Act by posting the sign, but Hein has asked that the decision be reconsidered. The sign has since been stolen.

“I’ve never said anything to that child,” Hein said. “If I have to stick up for my white rights, I have to stick up for my white rights. It goes both ways.”

The commission will meet to come to a final decision on Jan. 12, according to Brandi Martin, a spokeswoman for the Ohio Civil Rights Commission.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
May112011

Mosque Controversy: 'Bomb Making' Sign Riles Neighbors

Comstock/Thinkstock(AMHERST, N.Y.) -- A dispute over a mosque in Amherst, New York, has the community buzzing about a sign posted in a neighbor's yard that reads, "Bomb Making: Next Driveway."

Many of the mosque's other neighbors have come to its defense, saying linking the religious center to terrorism is preposterous, and though town officials say they don't like the sign, they say there is nothing they can do about it.

The dispute started when the Jaffarya Islamic Center started a new mosque construction two years ago.  According to Amherst town supervisor Barry Weinstein, the homeowner next to the mosque had several disputes with the mosque leaders and the town council over the facility's lighting and fencing.

The property is zoned for a community facility, and there are several businesses on the street, but the mosque is next to a residential property.

After several investigations by the town council and police department over the sign, they have determined that the sign is protected by the first amendment and cannot be forcibly removed.  Weinstein has made several attempts to contact the homeowner and Police Captain Michael Camilleri says they did speak with the homeowner over the civil matter.

"Other than monitor the situation, there's nothing that we can do," Camilleri said.

The grand opening celebration of the mosque is scheduled for Saturday, when leaders and participants will come from Ontario and New York City to participate in events.

The person listed at the residence with the sign, Michael Heick, could not be reached for comment.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jan152011

New Zodiac Signs 2011: Debunking a Zodiac Controversy

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- An astrological controversy erupted online Thursday after a newspaper article erroneously suggested that the dates that determine the Zodiac signs had shifted by about a month, throwing millions of believers into self-doubt and panic.

Fear not: your sign remains the same.

The tilt of the Earth's axis has gradually shifted since the ancient times when the Babylonians determined the dates of the Zodiac. The calendrical rejiggering also supposedly re-introduced a sign discarded by the Babylonians: Ophiuchus, alternatively called Serpentarius.

But astrologers and astronomers agree that this is old news. About 3,000 years old. Western astrologers included the wobble of the Earth's axis in their calculations centuries ago.

"Astronomers have known about this since 130 BC. Hipparchus was able to determine that this would happen," says Parke Kunkle, a board member of the Minnesota Planetarium Society. "It astounds me that this has taken off the way it has in the last day or two."

The popular astrologer Susan Miller called the news "ridiculous." In an interview with ABC News, she said, "We've known about this for ages. The constellations don't suggest what's coming up, it's the planets! The constellations are a measuring device."

In short, your astrological sign has not changed.

What has changed, subtly and very gradually, is the tilt of the earth's axis as it revolves around the sun.
If you watch a spinning toy top, explains Kunkle, you will see its axis wobble. That's called precession. The Earth's axis does the same thing. It's currently facing Polaris, often called the North Star, but 3,000 years ago it was pointing at an obscure star called Thuban.

In an August 2009 Pew poll, 25 percent of Americans said they believed in astrology; 71 percent said they did not.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio