SEARCH

Entries in Skype (4)

Monday
May072012

Soldier Who Died While Skype Chatting Was Not Shot, Army Says

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A soldier who died in Afghanistan while Skype chatting with his wife in America did not have a bullet wound, military officials said Monday despite the wife's claim that he had been shot.

The Army's Army Criminal Investigative Command came to its conclusion following an autopsy of Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark.

"Agents conducting the investigation, found no trauma to the body beyond minor abrasions and a possible broken nose most likely caused from Captain Clark striking his face on his desk when he collapsed," the command's spokesman Chris Grey said in a statement Monday morning.

"We do not suspect foul play in the death of Captain Clark at this point in our ongoing investigation," Grey said.

Clark's wife, Susan Orellana-Clark, previously described chatting with her husband on April 30 when the soldier suddenly fell forward and she saw a bullet hole in a closet behind him.

"During the Skype conversation on April 30, 2012, there was no sign that CPT Clark was in any discomfort, nor did he indicate any alarm. Then CPT Clark was suddenly knocked forward. The closet behind him had a bullet hole in it," Orellana-Clark's statement read.

The Skype video link continued for about two hours as Clark's family tried to get help, according to the statement.

"After two hours and many frantic phone calls by Mrs. Clark, two military personnel arrived in the room and appeared to check his pulse, but provided no details about his condition to his wife," she wrote.

The Army's statement Monday insisted that Clark had not been shot, and that the Army believed that there was no foul play in Clark's death.

In an earlier statement, the family said Clark was a "model father, husband, family member, U.S. Army Chief Nurse, and American citizen."

He is survived by his wife and two daughters, ages 3 and 9.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
May072012

Wife Skyping Soldier in Afghanistan Saw Bullet Hole After He Died

Mario Tama/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A woman who watched her husband, an Army nurse in Afghanistan, die during a Skype video chat, says she saw a bullet hole in the closet behind him after he collapsed suddenly.

In a statement released on Sunday by Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark’s family, his wife, Susan Orellana-Clark, described what she saw from the Skype video.

“During the Skype conversation on April 30th 2012, there was no sign that CPT Clark was in any discomfort, nor did he indicate any alarm.  Then CPT Clark was suddenly knocked forward.  The closet behind him had a bullet hole in it,” the statement read.

The Skype video link continued for about two hours as Clark’s family tried to get help, according to the statement.

“After two hours and many frantic phone calls by Mrs. Clark, two military personnel arrived in the room and appeared to check his pulse, but provided no details about his condition to his wife,” the statement continued.

The cause of Clark's death is still under investigation.  He is survived by his wife and two daughters, ages 3 and 9.´╗┐

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
May042012

Soldier Killed in Afghanistan During Skype Chat with Wife

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(EL PASO, Texas) -- A Michigan native serving as an Army medic in Afghanistan was killed during a Skype video chat with his Texas-based wife earlier this week, The Detroit Free Press reports.

Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark, a 43-year-old Army chief nurse, had been assigned to the William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso and deployed to Afghanistan in March. He was killed on Monday as his wife watched helplessly on a Skype video-chat. Clark's body was returned to Dover Air Force Base on Thursday.

A funeral is planned in Spencerport, N.Y., his wife's hometown where they formerly lived. A memorial service is also planned for Addison, Mich. where Clark graduated from high school, according to the paper.

Clark is survived by his wife and two daughters, aged 3 and 9.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Mar312011

Marine Sgt. Ken Pompili Meets His Daughter for the First Time

Comstock/Thinkstock(COLUMBUS, Ohio) -- Last December, Marine Sgt. Ken Pompili was eagerly awaiting the birth of his daughter, Rylie, watching his wife's every move, every labor pain and every push from an armored vehicle 7,000 miles away in Afghanistan.

Pompili was witnessing the birth through a Skype connection, surrounded by his Marine unit from Lima Company.

"She sounds like she's in a lot of pain," he said, watching. "I don't like hearing her upset or in pain. It's hard for me to be here and not be able to be there for her and comfort her when I need to be."

Thursday, Pompili and the 178 other Marines in Lima Company were able to be there for their loved ones, finally returning home to Columbus, Ohio.

Pompili met his little girl for the first time, holding the tiny hand of a little lady dressed in a shirt reading, "Get out of my way I'm here to pick up my daddy!"

For the Marines of Lima Company, homecomings come with a deep appreciation. Their unit was the hardest hit in the Iraq War. In 2005, they lost 23 men, and more than 40 were wounded.

In Afghanistan they were deployed to Helmand Province -- a Taliban stronghold -- leaving their families behind.

Their stories of hope and loss offer a picture of the war one rarely sees.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio´╗┐







ABC News Radio