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Entries in twitter (27)

Saturday
Feb022013

250,000 Twitter Accounts Hacked: Don’t Panic, Here’s What to Do

SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Approximately 250,000 Twitter account passwords have been compromised by hackers, Twitter said in a blog on Friday, noting that the company now is among the “recent uptick in large-scale security attacks aimed at U.S. technology and media companies,” including the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.

Twitter has already taken action on the compromised accounts, requiring a password reset before any hacked handle can be accessed again. All infiltrated accounts have also received email alerts, so check your inbox just to be safe.

If this all sounds familiar, we’ve been through a similar drill before. On Nov. 8, 2012, Twitter mistakenly asked a “large number of accounts” to reset their passwords after they found a small group of accounts to at risk of being compromised.

While the number of affected Twitter handles account for less than 0.125 percent of the service’s 200 million active tweeters, the number represents Twitter’s largest data compromise to date. Even so, the attack pales in comparison to LinkedIn’s security breach in June of last year, where 6.4 million passwords were stolen.

Twitter is taking this opportunity to remind the other 99.9 percent of its users to ensure that their passwords are strong, with “at least 10 (but more is better) characters and a mixture of upper- and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols – that you are not using for any other accounts or sites.”

It also recommends using different passwords for every site you frequent, a Twitter password should be different than, say, your Gmail or Facebook password.

 

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Nov062012

Ballot and Polling-Place Photos: Think Before You Instagram or Share

Joanna Stern/ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and all the other social media outlets you can imagine are on fire Tuesday with photos of people voting.  But before you snap a shot of your ballot or inside the polling place, you might want to think twice.

As pointed out by Pro Publica, the investigative journalism group in New York City, it is illegal to take a photo or a recording in polling centers in many states.  State laws in Florida, Texas, Kentucky, Michigan, Nevada, North Carolina and Georgia, for instance, directly prohibit recording inside a polling place.

“No photography is permitted in the polling room or early-voting area,” Section 102.031(5) of the Florida statute says.

In addition to recording or taking photos in polling places, in many states -- including Alaska, New York, New Jersey and Utah -- taking a photo of one’s marked ballot and sharing it is also prohibited.  The Digital Media Law Project provides a breakdown by state of where it is prohibited or allowed to take photos or recordings in polling places.

“In Maryland and in many states, Instagraming the ballot or utilizing other recording devices while voting in a public place is prohibited,” Bradley Shear, a social media lawyer in Maryland, told ABC News.  “People should feel free to exercise their constitutional right to vote without fear that their votes may be captured and posted online for the entire world to see.  Therefore, it is good public policy to restrict the use of cameras and/or video in a public polling area.”

So, what is the penalty if you do it?

“In the states where it is prohibited, it is generally a misdemeanor.  Those are usually penalized by a fine and or up to a year in jail,” Jeffrey Hermes, the director of the Digital Media Law Project at Harvard University, told ABC News.  “Some states, most notably Hawaii and Michigan, have provisions for the disqualification of your vote if you disclose it publicly.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Aug082012

NYPD Identifies Source of Threatening Tweets

SAEED KHAN/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The New York Police Department has identified the person whose Twitter account issued threats of an attack "just like in Aurora" on the Broadway theater where Mike Tyson's one-man show is playing.

"We have identified that person and we are shortly going to be interviewing that person," NYPD Police Commissioner Ray Kelly told ABC News' New York station WABC. "That person is not in New York City. Of course, there is always the possibility of someone using someone's account, so we are conducting an investigation."

The owner of the Twitter account is out of state, but Kelly would not discuss the specifics of where the person is located.

The NYPD subpoenaed Twitter Tuesday for the user's identity after the social media giant refused authorities' emergency request for the information.

"This s**t ain't no joke yo I'm serious people are gonna die just like in aurora," the user tweeted Aug. 1.

The Twitter user's account seemed to have been suspended because an error message now appears where the account was active as recently as Tuesday evening.

Kelly said the person who tweeted the threats could face charges such as reckless statement and reckless endangerment.

"Irrespective of that, this is information that we have to know," he said. "When we get a message like that, we have to react to it and find out where it came from and certainly deploy -- as we did -- additional resources."

A few days before the Aug. 1 tweet, the unidentified person posted that he or she knew that the theater left its exit doors unlocked and was going to plan the shooting "step by step."

The NYPD Intelligence Division learned of the threat late Aug. 3 and used Twitter's system for emergencies to request the identity of the account holder, according to police officials.

"Twitter turned us down, so we dispatched police to cover the theater while we sought a subpoena to force Twitter to disclose the identity of the account holder," NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said in an emailed statement Tuesday.

Police officers were dispatched to New York's Longacre Theater, where Mike Tyson's one-man show, Undisputed Truth, is playing.

"We take the threat seriously, especially in light of recent attacks in Wisconsin and Colorado," Browne said.

Alleged shooter Wade Michael Page killed six people Sunday at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis. Page, an Army veteran, was shot dead by police. Two weeks earlier, on July 20, suspected shooter James Holmes opened fire in a packed midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, Colo., killing 12 people and injuring 58.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Aug082012

Twitter Gives Police Info on Source of Threatening Tweet

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Twitter has now turned over information it had initially denied to the New York Police Department about the user whose account issued threats of an attack "just like in Aurora" on the Broadway theater where Mike Tyson's one-man show is playing.

NYPD subpoenaed Twitter Tuesday for the user's identity after the social media giant refused authorities' emergency request for the information.

"This s**t ain't no joke yo I'm serious people are gonna die just like in aurora," the user tweeted Aug. 1.

Police officials won't comment on whether they have spoken to the account's owner or the potential for any attack. Police said they have some indication of the direction their investigation might take, based on the information Twitter provided, but would not disclose it at this time.

The Twitter user's account seems to have been suspended because an error message now appears where the account was active as recently as Tuesday evening.

A few days before the Aug. 1 tweet, the unidentified person posted that he or she knew that the theater left its exit doors unlocked and was going to plan the shooting "step by step."

The NYPD Intelligence Division learned of the threat late Aug. 3 and used Twitter's system for emergencies to request the identity of the account holder, according to police officials.

"Twitter turned us down, so we dispatched police to cover the theater while we sought a subpoena to force Twitter to disclose the identity of the account holder," NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said in an emailed statement Tuesday.

Police officers were dispatched to New York's Longacre Theater where Mike Tyson's one-man show, Undisputed Truth, is playing.

"We take the threat seriously, especially in light of recent attacks in Wisconsin and Colorado," Browne said.

Alleged shooter Wade Michael Page killed six people Sunday at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis. Page, an Army veteran, was shot dead by police. Two weeks earlier, on July 20, suspected shooter James Holmes opened fire in a packed midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, Colo., killing 12 people and injuring 58.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Aug072012

NYPD to Subpoena Twitter for 'Just Like in Aurora' Tweet

Hemera/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The New York Police Department has demanded that Twitter release the name of a user who threatened an attack "just like in Aurora" on the Broadway theater where Mike Tyson's one-man show is playing.

The NYPD plans to subpoena Twitter today for the user's identity after the social media giant refused authorities' emergency request for the information.

"This s**t ain't no joke yo I'm serious people are gonna die just like in aurora," the user tweeted Aug. 1.

A few days earlier, the unidentified person tweeted that he or she knew that the theater left its exit doors unlocked and was going to plan the shooting "step by step."

The NYPD Intelligence Division learned of the threat late Aug. 3 and used Twitter's system for emergencies to request the identity of the account holder, according to police officials.

"Twitter turned us down, so we dispatched police to cover the theater while we sought a subpoena to force Twitter to disclose the identity of the account holder," NYPD spokesman Paul Browne said in an emailed statement.

Police officers were dispatched to New York's Longacre Theater where Mike Tyson's one-man show, Undisputed Truth, is playing.

"We take the threat seriously, especially in light of recent attacks in Wisconsin and Colorado," Browne said.

Alleged shooter Wade Michael Page killed six people Sunday at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis. Page, an Army veteran, was shot dead by police. Two weeks earlier, on July 20, suspected shooter James Holmes opened fire in a packed midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises in Aurora, Colo., killing 12 people and injuring 58.

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Following email requests for comment from ABC News, a spokeswoman for Twitter wrote, "We don't have a comment on this." She also sent a link to Twitter's guidelines for law enforcement.

"Twitter evaluates emergency disclosure requests on a case-by-case basis," the guidelines say. "If we receive information that gives us a good faith belief that there is an emergency involving the death or serious physical injury to a person, we may provide information necessary to prevent that harm, if we have it."

The guidelines also say that the release of private information "requires a subpoena or court order."

If Twitter were to turn over the user's identity at the first request, it could be liable for any mistake or potential invasion of privacy, according to Jennifer Granick, the director of civil liberties for Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society.

"The law prohibits providers from turning certain information over voluntarily and, if they do, they can be sued," Granick said. "But the government can compel the information from the provider with varying degrees of legal process depending on what the information is. When it's the name associated with the account, the government can get that with just the subpoena."

The federal law is part of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, passed in 1986. There are exceptions to the law, Granick said. Exceptions can be made if there's a threat of serious bodily injury or death. But that first decision is up to the provider.

When another Twitter user asked the threatening tweeter on Aug. 3 whether he or she had undergone a change of heart about the prospective shooting at the Midtown Manhattan theater, the person replied, "no I had last minute plans and I'm in Florida rite now but it'll happen I promise I'm just finishing up my hit list."

The Twitter user makes frequent references to his or her "hit list," making threats against many celebrities, including Ellen Page, Perez Hilton, Wendy Williams and several members of the Kardashian family.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jul262012

Twitter Experiences Second Major Outage in the Last Six Weeks

Oli Scarff/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Only six weeks after experiencing a widespread outage, Twitter went down again Thursday for most users.

At around 11 a.m. ET, Twitter users started to see their streams come to a screeching halt and were not able to send 140-character messages. Twitter confirmed to ABC News that it was aware of the outage and that its engineers were looking into it.

Twitter attributed the outage in June to a "cascaded bug" in one of its infrastructure components. In other words, major technical difficulties.

As of February, the Pew Internet and American Life Project reported that "some 15 percent of online adults use Twitter, and 8 percent do so on a typical day."

Twitter is expected to see increased traffic from the upcoming Olympic games. NBC and others have partnered with the social media service to share news, links and videos.

Google's Talk service also experienced an outage today.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Feb112012

Whitney Houston Dies: Stars Flood Twitter with Tributes 

Kevin Mazur/AMA2009/WireImage(NEW YORK) -- Soon after the death of Whitney Houston was confirmed Saturday, celebrities, fans and friends of the late singer flooded Twitter with tributes.  At one point, every trending topic on Twitter was Whitney-related.  Here's a roundup of some of the comments about Houston's passing:

Mariah Carey: "Heartbroken and in tears over the shocking death of my friend, the incomparable Ms. Whitney Houston. My heartfelt condolences to Whitney's family and to all her millions of fans throughout the world. She will never be forgotten as one of the greatest voices to ever grace the earth."

Christina Aguilera: "We have lost another legend. Love and prayers to Whitney's family. She will be missed."

Pink: "Whitney was the reason many of us do what we do. 'a few stolen moments is all that we share' RIP."

Nicki Minaj:  "Jesus Christ, not Whitney Houston. Greatest of all time."

Gloria Estefan: "Shocked we've lost the immensely talented Whitney Houston! Sending prayers of peace & solace 2 her family, friends & fans! Such a loss!"

Usher:  "R.I.P Whitney Houston... A true icon of our time. Gone too soon. My heart goes out to the family in their time of distress."

Jennifer Lopez: "Such a loss. One of the greatest voices of our time. Sending out prayers to her family... #R.I.P.Whitney."

Cee Lo Green: "R.I.P. Sister WHITNEY HOUSTON!!!!! We will always love you."

Katy Perry: "So devastating. We will always love you Whitney, R.I.P."

Simon Cowell: "I am so sad to hear about Whitney. We have lost one of the greatest singers of all time."

Queen Latifah: "Oh Dear Lord! Hurting so Bad!!! MY Sister Whitney!!!!!!! Newark please Pray!!! World Please Pray!"

Rihanna: "No words! Just tears #DearWhitney....Feels so strange being at the Grammy rehearsal right now!!"

Bruno Mars: "This is terrible news..I'm sick to my stomach. Nobody sang like Whitney."

Smokey Robinson: "I've known Whitney since she was a little girl and I have always loved her. She was like family to me and I will miss her dearly."

Clay Aiken: “RIP Whitney Houston. The soundtrack of so many lives. I’m sure Heaven reverberates 2nite with the sound of ur voice. It always was angelic.”

Ruben Studdard: "I just can't believe Whitney is gone. What an amazing voice. Rest In Peace Whitney I will Always Love You!!!!!!"

Nickelback: "Rest in Peace Whitney Houston. Thank you for the gift you gave us all."

Chris Daughtry:  "Whitney Houston dead at 48. Wow! I'm speechless."

Justin Bieber: "just heard the news. so crazy. One of the GREATEST VOICES EVER just passed. RIP Whitney Houston. My prayers go out to her friends and family."

Tony Bennett: "It's a tragedy. Whitney Houston was the greatest singer I've ever heard and she will be truly missed."

L.A. Reid:  "I am completely devastated by the loss of the greatest voice of all time! R.I.P. Whitney Houston. I will always love you!"

Chaka Khan: "I'm speechless...I'm in shock right now. Just pray for her and the family."

Toni Braxton: "My heart is weeping...RIP to the Legendary Diva & Icon Whitney Houston!!!!! Such an incredible influence over music as a whole!"

Ricky Martin: "RIP Whitney Houston. Sending my love and deepest condolences to her family and friends. Fly Whitney Fly."

Paris Hilton: "So sad to hear the news about Whitney Houston. :( She was such a beautiful and talented woman. My heart goes out to her family."

Missy Elliott: "This is such a sad moment! I'm speechless I have no words of what I'm feeling right now. Rest in Peace Whitney Houston I love u."

Adam Levine: "Tomorrow night at the Grammys, the only person on our minds will be Whitney Houston."

Glee star Amber Riley: "I had to pull over off the road. RIP Whitney Houston. I'm glad now that I got to meet you and thank you for your beautiful music."

Jessica Simpson: "I found my voice singing Whitney Houston's music. Today I lost my idol."

Slash: "Shattering news about Whitney. RIP."

Bette Midler: "Please, please someone tell me it's not true."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Feb082012

Roland Martin Suspended by CNN Over ‘Offensive’ Tweets

Joe Kohen/WireImage/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- CNN has smacked the “ish” out of Roland Martin.

The commentator has been suspended indefinitely for tweets he sent during Sunday’s Super Bowl that were criticized as being anti-gay, according to a statement released Wednesday. One tweet said, “If a dude at your Super Bowl party is hyped about David Beckham’s H&M underwear ad, smack the ish out of him!”

“Roland Martin’s tweets were regrettable and offensive,” CNN’s statement reportedly said. “Language that demeans is inconsistent with the values and culture of our organization, and is not tolerated. We have been giving careful consideration to this matter, and Roland will not be appearing on our air for the time being.”

“CNN today took a strong stand against anti-LGBT violence and language that demeans any community,” said Rich Ferraro, a spokesperson for the gay rights organization GLAAD. “Yesterday, Martin also spoke out against anti-LGBT violence. We look forward to hearing from CNN and Roland Martin to discuss how we can work together as allies and achieve our common goal of reducing anti-LGBT violence as well as the language that contributes to it.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jan302012

Pair Detained in Los Angeles After Apparent Twitter Mix-Up: Reports

KIMIHIRO HOSHINO/AFP/Getty Images(LOS ANGELES) -- A young couple was detained at a Los Angeles airport after Homeland Security agents mistook a couple Twitter quips for threats against the U.S., the two told British media Monday.

Friends Irishman Leigh Van Bryan, 26, and British citizen Emily Bunting, 24, were reportedly interrogated and spent 12 hours locked up under armed guard after going through customs in Los Angeles International Airport last week. According to several British outlets, the couple was taken into custody by U.S. Department of Homeland Security agents because of the slang in Bryan's tweets.

"Free this week, for quick gossip/prep before I go and destroy America," one of the tweets read. Bryan told The Sun that in this context "destroy" just meant party.

"The Homeland Security agents were treating me like some kind of terrorist. I kept saying they had got the wrong meaning from my tweet but they just told me 'You've really f***ed up with that tweet, boy'," Bryan told The Sun.

Bryan had also tweeted that he planned to be "diggin' Marilyn Monroe up!" -- another joke, he said.

"The officials told us we were not allowed in to the country because of Leigh's tweet," Bunting told The Daily Mail. "They wanted to know what we were going to do... They asked why we wanted to destroy America and we tried to explain it meant to get trashed and party... I almost burst out laughing when they asked me if I was going to be Leigh's lookout while he dug up Marilyn Monroe."

After spending the night in custody, Bryan and Bunting were reportedly put on a plane back home through Paris.

Officials at the Department of Homeland Security declined to comment for this report, but said they will be releasing a statement concerning the incident shortly.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Dec282011

DHS Creates Accounts Solely to Monitor Social Networks

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- An online privacy group is suing the U.S. Department of Homeland Security accusing it of not releasing records from the agency's covert surveillance of Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites.

The DHS creates accounts solely to monitor social media sites and establish a system of records of the information gathered. The agency does not post information, seek to connect with other users, accept invitations to connect or interact with others according to a statement on their website.

The agency scans social media sites for a list of words that include "dirty bomb," "hostage," "exercise," "task force," "explosion," "lockdown," "riot," "nuclear threat," "brown out," "meth lab," "cain and abel" and "brute forcing."

Several countries and cities, including North Korea and Mexico, are also flagged as key words.

In a statement, the DHS said that the National Operations Center (NOC) "will gather, store, analyze, and disseminate relevant and appropriate de-identified information to federal, state, local, and foreign governments, and private sector partners authorized to receive situational awareness and a common operating picture," said the statement.

In April 2011, the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) requested records from the DHS of the agency's social network monitoring program. The agency has an obligation to locate the records and notify the requestor if the records are available for release.

Marc Rotenberg, EPIC's executive director, told ABC News that the requests have gone unanswered.

On Dec. 20, EPIC filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the DHS.

"We want to know how they're collecting information online, what they're collecting online and if there's legal basis to do this," Rotenberg told ABC News.

"We are trying to understand what the circumstances are when the DHS is engaged in tracking to social media sites," Rotenberg added.

The DHS declined to comment on the issue.

Former FBI agent and ABC News consultant Brad Garrett said this initiative is nothing new.

"One of the biggest overlooked areas of the federal government when it comes to crime and terrorism is diligently searching public source information," said Garrett.

Garrett said the DHS can see online information that's not available to the public as long as they have legal authority, in the form of a search warrant, to do so. But often people leave private information open to the public.

"People today are very open about their thoughts and feelings on a number of different topics. It amazes me the amount of information people will write about themselves online. There's a false security about the anonymity of sitting in front of a computer screen and saying things you wouldn't say in public or in front of your parents or your spouse," said Garrett.

Garrett said the DHS should be monitoring social media sites.

"It's one of those things that the government should be doing as long as they're obeying the law. I can't tell you how many bad guys have been caught because they do something bad and then post about it online," Garrett said.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio