Man Wrestled Gun Away from Armed Intruder in Heart-stopping Confrontation

San Francisco Police Department(SAN FRANCISCO) -- A San Francisco man said he saw his life flash before his eyes during a terrifying fight with an armed home invader in his garage -- grabbing the suspect's gun and slapping away his knife in an incident captured on stunning video footage.

Bill Oxidean, a father of two, was in his garage when he says he was attacked by a man with a gun last Monday, he told ABC News on Monday.

"Suddenly I saw a guy walking up the street that didn't look good at all," Oxidean, 41, told ABC News. "As I brought my trash can in he ran into the garage and attacked me."

The entire encounter was caught on video, beginning when the suspect, dressed in a gray hoodie, ran up behind Oxidean. The video was released by the San Francisco Police Department.

"He came in big and bold, full force," Oxidean said. Oxidean said the suspect was a stranger.

The fight moved across the garage, and Oxidean was eventually able to get his attacker on the ground. Oxidean said he also slapped a knife away from the suspect during the struggle.

Oxidean said he then got on top of the suspect, grabbed the gun and ran from the garage.

The victim said it was "hard work and determination" that allowed him to get the gun.

"I fought that guy down," he said. "I turned around and tried to shoot him with it, but the gun was jammed."

Oxidean suffered minor injuries, but said he "saw my life flash before my eyes" during the attack. "It was a movie I didn't want to star in."

The suspect, who remained at large as of Monday, fled the scene on foot, Officer Grace Gatpandan of the San Francisco Police Department told ABC News.

A gun and knife were taken from the scene, Gatpandan said.

The suspect is described as between 23- and 27 years old, about 5-foot-10 and 150 pounds, Gatpandan said. Anyone with information is asked to call the SFPD.

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Passenger Describes 'Heavy Thud' as Amtrak Train Derailed in Vermont

Mario Tama/Getty Images(NORTHFIELD, Vt.) — An Amtrak passenger said he heard a "really heavy thud" as the train derailed over an embankment near Northfield, Vermont, this morning, injuring seven people.

"The car was shaking from side to side and I could tell something was going off the tracks," Ian Turpin, 24, from Brooklyn, New York, told ABC News.

Then the train screeched to a halt, he said.

Train 55 -- the Vermonter -- was traveling from St. Albans, Vermont, to Washington, D.C., when it derailed after striking a rock slide on the tracks, Amtrak said.

Seven people were injured, the Federal Railroad Administration said. One crew member suffered serious injuries while two crew members and four passengers had non-life-threatening injuries, according to the FRA. Amtrak said the four hospitalized passengers have since been released.

A total of five passenger cars and the engine derailed, officials said. The train was carrying 98 passengers and four crew members, the FRA said.

"The preliminary cause of the accident is a rock slide in the path of the train," the FRA said, adding that a full investigation will be conducted to find the official cause.

Gov. Peter Shumlin said the rail is safe, calling the Vermonter "a great train line." Officials said there was no reason to believe there was any negligence; the track was recently rebuilt and state of the art.

The track is owned and maintained by the New England Central Railroad, Amtrak said. Michael Williams, spokesman for the New England Central Railroad and its parent company Genesee & Wyoming Inc., told ABC News that "as with all such incidents, there will be a full investigation to determine any learnings that could help prevent future incidents."

This accident comes just five months after an Amtrak train derailed near Philadelphia, killing eight people.

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American Airlines Pilot Dies Mid-Flight

iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(SYRACUSE, N.Y.) -- An American Airlines pilot died mid-flight after experiencing a medical emergency Monday morning, airline officials said.

The pilot, whose name and age were not released, was flying from Boston to Phoenix when the plane was forced to land in Syracuse, New York.

There were 147 passengers on board with five crew members, including the pilot. An airline spokesperson confirmed the incident to ABC News and said it is "incredibly saddened" and is focusing on taking care of the family members and crew involved.

Recordings of the crew's communications with air traffic control, obtained via, show that someone on the plane called in saying that the "captain is incapacitated" and at another point, saying "pilot is unresponsive, not breathing."

The nature of the pilot's sudden illness has not been disclosed.

An airline spokesperson said that one of the flight attendants is also a nurse and was trying to assist the ill pilot.

Airlines in the United States are required to have two pilots on board, and that was true in this case as well.

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Oregon Umpqua Shooting Survivor Recalls Terrifying Moments Inside Classroom

ABC News(ROSEBURG, Ore.) — A student who survived the deadly shooting at Oregon’s Umpqua Community College by pretending to be dead told ABC News about the events on that fateful day.

“I could hear everyone breathing hard and freaking out and crying,” Anastasia Boylan, 18, said. “And he [the gunman] asked everyone to move to the center of the classroom, so we all kind of army-crawled to the center.”

Boylan said she didn’t think she was going to make it.

“Last thing I remembered praying was that my family and my loved ones and that the family and loved ones of my peers would somehow know that we're all OK,” she said, “and that they could somehow find peace.”

From her wheelchair inside the Oregon hospital that helped save her from a gunshot wound to the back, Boylan recounted the terrifying nine minutes inside the Roseburg school last Thursday, when gunman Chris Harper-Mercer, 26, opened fire, killing nine people before shooting himself to death.

Boylan said he even spoke to them. “He sounded really deranged,” she said, “because he said he had been waiting to do that for a really long time and he laughed.”

The shooter picked out one student specifically to be the one who would live to tell the tale, she added.

“He said, 'The kid in the glasses, get up. I need you to do me a favor. Today's your lucky day,' and hands him this like business envelope.”

Boylan also said the man had a question for each of his victims.

“He had us all get up one by one and asked us what our religions were,” Boylan said.

One student was shot when said his religion. “The shooter said that he would only feel pain for a couple of seconds and that he would be with God soon and then he shot him,” Boylan recalled.

Boylan played dead as the suspect called out to her and kept her eyes shut. And then it was over.

“All of a sudden I heard that one kid in my class say that he was dead, ‘He's dead, he's shot in the head, everything's OK.’ I didn't want to open my eyes. I did and I looked around the classroom and it was horrible. It was the worst thing I've ever seen in my life.”

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Search and Rescue Commences Amid Historic South Carolina Flooding

iStock/Thinkstock(CHARLESTON, S.C.) -- The Coast Guard joined rescue efforts on Sunday near Charleston, South Carolina, as rain continued to fall on the area, part of a storm system causing flash flood emergencies and power outages along the East Coast.

Gov. Nikki Haley said Sunday afternoon that the state was experiencing its worst rains "in 1,000 years," and urged residents to stay off the roads as conditions were "changing by the minute," with roads flooding and rivers at their highest levels in decades.

The Coast Guard Charleston Sector said it was assisting with land rescues in Berkeley County, near Huger, which is northwest of Charleston.

According to the National Weather Service, one area of downtown Columbia, the South Carolina capital, received nearly 17 inches of rain in 17 hours, and it was still raining.

"We're in the middle of it," she said. "We've still got easily another 24 hours that you should be extremely careful. We've got more rainfall that's expected."

There were six weather-related fatalities in South Carolina and two weather-related death in North Carolina, according to South Carolina Emergency Management Division as of early Monday morning, bringing the total of eight deaths across the two states.

The South Carolina Department of Transportation earlier announced Sunday that one of its workers died in flood waters in Columbia.

Columbia’s police department announced that authorities will commence concentrated search and rescue operations Monday morning. The operation includes helping residents of Columbia and Richland County residents who need to be evacuated. Those citizens who are rescued will be taken out of the flood zone in military vehicles and transported by bus to a designated safe zone shelter, said the department. Crews will also mark a bright orange ‘X’ on the front door of a house that had been checked.

The National Weather Service Charleston South Carolina tweeted that the flash flood warning for Berkeley, Charleston, and Dorchester counties was extended until 9:30 Monday morning.

South Carolina Emergency Management also reported that 10 counties or municipalities have declared states of emergency, while eight counties or municipalities have imposed overnight curfews.

Some 30,000 customers were without power, and a 75-mile stretch of I-95 was closed as a result of the flooding.

Over the next two days, parts of eastern South Carolina and North Carolina could receive 10 more inches of rain.

Other sections of South Carolina experienced incredible amounts of rain. Columbia received over 7 inches Saturday night, while North Myrtle Beach accumulated over 15 inches worth of water in the past few days.

South Carolina's Greenville-Spartanburg Airport got 2.3 inches of rain Saturday, breaking the record of 0.77 inches back in 1961, according to NWS meteorologist John Tomko.

On Sunday, the rain will begin to pivot and slip north and east toward the border of North Carolina and South Carolina and near the coastline. The combination of saturated ground and winds will likely bring down trees, as winds along the coastline will be gusting up to 30 miles per hour.

A flash flood emergency was issued for Berkeley and Charleston counties, with catastrophic flash flooding expected, according to NWS. A flash flood emergency was also issued for southern portions of Dorchester County, the NWS tweeted, which was characterized as a "life-threatening situation."

Meanwhile, Charleston County Emergency Management reported swift water rescues taking place in Charleston, North Charleston, Ladson, Cainhoy and Awendaw, with evacuations continuing in Shadowmoss.

Mario Formisano, emergency management director for Dorchester County, said that the flooding has been widespread and that there were about 140 rescues Saturday evening into Sunday morning. He added that SUVs and trucks were being used to rescue trapped residents, and that those rescued or evacuated were taken to Summerville High School.

According to the South Carolina Emergency Management Division early Sunday morning, more than 29,000 electric customers were without power throughout the state. It also reported that there are 83 road closures across South Carolina, 46 of them in Charleston County.

In downtown Charleston Saturday, roads were closed to incoming traffic as rain flooded roads and left some drivers stranded as their vehicles were surrounded by water. Meanwhile, inland parts of South Carolina were also hit hard by the rain.

The mid-Atlantic region was also affected by flooded roads and power outages were reported in several states.

On Friday, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley emphasized the seriousness of the storm during a press conference: "We're going see rainfall at historic levels. This will be a historic rainfall event that we've never seen before in South Carolina."

In response to the storm, President Obama declared a state of emergency in South Carolina, which will bring federal assistance to state and local efforts.

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Young YouTube Star Caleb Bratayley Dead of Natural Causes

SAMANTHA SIN/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- A lot of kids and families are in mourning following the sudden death of popular 13-year-old YouTube star Caleb Logan Bratayley.

Caleb was the oldest of three siblings known as The Bratayleys. The kids grew up on camera, with the family posting videos every day for years on YouTube of the siblings taking trips, doing science projects, and goofing around. The channel has more than a million and a half subscribers.

The family says Caleb died suddenly on Thursday. The only explanation so far has been natural causes.

Caleb was in the middle of filming a docu-series for Maker Studios with ABC News, and recently got to interview Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina.

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Oregon Pastor Tells of 'My Family's Hero' in College Shooting

Carol McKinley/ABC News(ROSEBERG, Ore.) -- A Roseberg, Oregon, pastor whose daughter survived the Umpqua Community College shooting gave an impassioned sermon on Sunday, describing the horror unleashed in the school classroom.

"I want to tell of my family's hero," Pastor Randy Scroggins said to begin his sermon Sunday at a packed New Beginnings Church of God, telling the story of how his daughter, Lacey, 18, escaped being killed and the young man who likely saved her life.

Scroggins appeared to be on the verge of tears as he recounted what his daughter -- who was sitting in the front row of the church with her mother -- told him about the events of Thursday morning, when 26-year-old Chris Harper-Mercer, brandishing a gun, told everyone to get down.

At first Lacey thought it was part of a writing exercise for class, but then she realized it was all too real, Scroggins said.

She heard Mercer questioning her classmates one by one before he shot them, asking at least two, "What religion are you? Are you a Christian?"

Lacey told her father that the shooter then asked one man to come to the front. He gave the student a backpack with a thumb drive in it.

"You're the lucky one. You're not going to die today," he said.

After Lacey heard a shot so close to her head her ears were ringing, she realized the boy next to her, Treven Anspach, had been shot and he was bleeding, Scroggins said. That's when Anspach started rolling toward her.

"I felt Treven's body as it moved over mine," Lacey told her father.

"The blood of that boy that covered my daughter saved her life," Scroggins said.

With Anspach lying on top of her, Lacey didn't move when Mercer told her to get up. He asked a woman nearby if Lacey was alive, and when the woman replied that she didn't know, he walked over Lacey and shot another student, Scroggins said.

Mercer had killed nine people before police arrived and engaged him in a gunfight. The Medical Examiner's report said he took his own life and Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin told ABC News he believes the police could have shot him and then he killed himself.

"Someone asked me, 'Can you forgive the shooter?'" Scroggins told his congregation. "I don't focus on the man. I focus on the evil that was in the man."

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How Couple Pulled Off Charleston Wedding During Major Storm

WCIV-TV(CHARLESTON, S.C.) -- No amount of rainfall or flooding in Charleston, South Carolina, could dampen the wedding plans of a Kansas City couple.

Britney Mysinger and Jason Houdek had organized a Saturday wedding in Charleston, but as a major storm hit, they thought their plans were thwarted, according to ABC affiliate WCIV-TV. Police closed off access to the Charleston peninsula, forcing the officiant, photographers and make-up artists to back out.

Even the groomsmen were stranded on the Isle of Palms, miles from downtown Charleston, WCIV-TV said.

The bride and groom turned to the news station for help.

"If anyone in the area can actually marry us, that would be greatly appreciated," Mysinger told WCIV-TV.
And after that, the wedding began to fall into place. City Councilman Mike Seekings saw the broadcast, got in touch with the TV station and told the couple he could officiate the wedding.

Then college student Hannah Summer heard about the situation and volunteered via Twitter to be their wedding photographer.

Summer even found a member of a local acapella group to DJ the reception, WCIV-TV said.

And as for the stranded groomsmen, a military Humvee gave them a ride, according to WCIV-TV.

After a perfect storm of events, Mysinger and Houdek said their "I do's."

"With everyone just putting everything together we appreciate it so much, and it feels great to finally call this man my husband," Mysinger told WCIV-TV.

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Churches in Roseburg Hold Services to Remember Shooting Victims

Scott Olson/Getty Images(ROSEBURG, Ore.) -- Religious services are taking place in Roseburg, Oregon to remember those killed in an Oregon community college shooting.

Family and friends of victims from Thursday's mass shooting at Umpqua Community College gathered for religious services on Sunday to remember the nine people who were killed.

Churches in Roseburg have opened there doors to anyone who needs to grieve, including Pastor Tim Powlison of the New Life Christian Center who said he was "broken-hearted in every imaginable way."

"People are in shock," he said. "Still in shock."

According to witnesses of the shooting, the shooter was targeting Christians specifically.

"I think our response as a church needs to be the response of Jesus, and that is to love love them," he said. "And, to let them know that we don't hate people.  We don't hate them."

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Oregon Campus Shooter Died by Suicide, Officials Said

Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images(ROSEBURG, Ore.) -- The gunman who opened fire at the Umpqua Community College in Oregon Thursday died by suicide, officials said Saturday.

The news was released by Douglas County Sheriff John Hanlin at a news conference, on behalf of the Oregon State Medical Examiner.

Ten people, including the gunman, died in the shooting spree.

Hanlin said law enforcement officials were on the scene within five minutes of the first 9-1-1 calls and four minutes later, the shooter was down.

The sheriff also reported another gun was found at the shooter's residence, bringing the gunman's total number of firearms to 14.

Classes will be canceled at Umpqua Community College this week and grief counselors will be on hand to meet with students.

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