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Wednesday
May112011

2012 Presidential Contender Donald Trump Tumbles in New Poll

Mike Stobe/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Donald Trump has often watched his personal fortunes go up and down, so why should his political fortunes be any different?

The real estate mogul and reality TV host was riding high for a while as a possible Republican presidential nominee on the strength of his argument that President Obama might not have been born in the U.S., thus making him constitutionally ineligible to hold national office.

On April 15, a Public Policy Polling survey showed Trump leading all GOP competitors with 26 percent popularity, with former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee far back in second place with 17 percent followed by a group of other potential candidates.

Then something happened.  Namely, the president released the original copy of his birth certificate, showing he was indeed born in Honolulu, Hawaii in August of 1961.

While some hard-core "birthers" might not have been convinced, apparently enough of them were to send Trump's latest poll numbers plummeting.

Huckabee leads the pack now with 19 percent, with the runners-up Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich and Sarah Palin.  Trump is now tied with Texas Congressman Ron Paul for fifth place, with eight percent.

Being made fun of at the White House Correspondent's Dinner by the president, as well as recent questions about his past business dealings, have also knocked some of the shine off the Trump brand.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

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