SEARCH

Entries in Adoption (3)

Monday
May142012

Despite Romney Claim, Same-Sex Adoption Laws Vary

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Mitt Romney claimed last week that “all states but one allow gay adoption,” a statistic that came into question Monday.

“So that’s a position, which has been decided by most of the state legislatures, including the one in my state. So I simply acknowledge the fact that gay adoption is legal in all states but one,” Romney told a CBS affiliate in North Carolina Friday.

But according to statistics from the Human Rights Campaign, only 18 states and Washington, D.C., allow same-sex couples to adopt through joint adoption, including Romney’s home state of Massachusetts, and in Colorado and Minnesota, same-sex couples have been able to successfully petition to adopt in some jurisdictions.

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia allow same-sex couples to adopt through “second parent adoption,” which allows one parent to adopt a child while the partner petitions to become the second guardian.  Same-sex couples in eight additional states have successfully petitioned courts for second-parent adoption in some jurisdictions.

But when it comes to state statutes, Mississippi is the lone state with a specific law barring same-sex couples from adopting a child.

Two states recently changed their adoption laws, which previously prohibited homosexuals from adopting.  Florida had a statute in place that did not allow adoption by homosexuals until 2010, when the ban was revoked, and in 2011, Arkansas ended its ban against unmarried couples from adopting, which kept same-sex couples from adoption but allowed single homosexuals to adopt.

Utah statute prohibits couples who are “cohabiting in a relationship that is not a legally valid and binding marriage under the laws of this state” from adopting children, but does not include any language about sexual orientation, though it should be noted that same-sex marriages are not recognized as valid in the state.

But many states’ laws on adoption by same-sex couples are vague and left to the discretion of judges.

The Romney campaign declined to comment on the story.

Romney has expressed support for same-sex adoption, which he believes is a state issue, most recently saying in an interview last Thursday that he was “fine” with same-sex couples adopting children despite standing against same-sex marriage.

“I believe marriage has been defined the same way for literally thousands of years by virtually every civilization in history and that marriage is literally by its definition a relationship between a man and a woman,”  he told Fox News’ Neil Cavuto Thursday. “And that if two people of the same gender want to live together, want to have a loving relationship and even want to adopt a child, in my state individuals of the same sex were able to adopt children. In my view that’s something that people have the right to do, but to call that marriage is, in my view, a departure of the real meaning of that word.”

While he has consistently supported same-sex adoption, Romney has called for an exemption for religious institutions who sponsor adoption services.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
May112012

Romney Consistent in Support of Gay Adoption

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Mitt Romney has consistently opposed same-sex marriage, but he again expressed support for gay adoption on Thursday, calling it “fine” and noting that it’s legal in his home state of Massachusetts. But he also stated his preference for every child to have a mother and a father.

“I believe marriage has been defined the same way for literally thousands of years by virtually every civilization in history and that marriage is literally by its definition a relationship between a man and a woman,”  he told Fox News’ Neil Cavuto. “And that if two people of the same gender want to live together, want to have a loving relationship and even want to adopt a child, in my state individuals of the same sex were able to adopt children. In my view that’s something that people have the right to do, but to call that marriage is, in my view, a departure of the real meaning of that word.”

Romney has made statements in the past in support of gay adoption, something social conservatives oppose. He has been consistent in supporting it, but has called for an exemption for religious institutions that have adoption services.

At a debate in Arizona in February he defended the Catholic Church’s stance in Massachusetts that would only place children up for adoption in homes with a mother and father. The state law declared it discrimination and the church stopped its adoption services.

“We have to have a president who’s willing to say that the best opportunity an individual can give to their unborn child is an opportunity to be born in a home with a mother and a father,” Romney said at the CNN debate. “We battled, for instance, to help the Catholic Church stay in the adoption business. The amazing thing was that while the Catholic Church was responsible for half the adoptions in my state — half the adoptions — they had to get out of that business because the legislature wouldn’t support me and give them an exemption from having to place children in homes where there was a mom and a dad on a preferential basis.”

In the past and even Thursday, Romney has made statements that are more open to the idea.

In October 2006, CNN’s Wolf Blitzer asked Romney if “gays and lesbians should be able to adopt children.”

Romney answered, “Well, they are able to adopt children,” before Blitzer followed up and asked if he thinks “that’s good?”

Romney answered, “And I’m not going to change that.”

That same year, while governor of Massachusetts, Romney told the Boston Globe that gay couples have “a legitimate interest in being able to receive adoptive services.”

Last October, Romney’s campaign said it should be a state issue, something Romney seemed to infer in Friday’s interview.

CNS News asked the campaign in October what the candidate’s thoughts were on gay adoption, and Romney spokesperson Ryan Williams said it was an issue Romney believes “should be assessed on a state-by-state basis” and referenced several statements the candidate has made on the matter.

That’s something Romney also said in 1994, telling the Boston Herald he would leave it up to the states and saying he “would not oppose it or require it.”

There are instances of a different attitude. In a 2003 speech in South Carolina, Romney told a conservative audience about same sex couples, “some are actually having children born to them.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
May112012

Romney Supports Gay Adoption, Doesn’t Recall Bullying Incident

Joe Raedle/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Mitt Romney expressed support for gay adoption on Thursday, calling it “fine” and noting that it’s legal in his home state of Massachusetts.  But he again stressed his opposition to same-sex marriage and his preference for every child to have a mother and a father. 

Also in the interview, he said he didn’t recall an incident in which he reportedly bullied a student presume to be gay.

On the marriage issue, he told Fox News’ Neil Cavuto, “I believe marriage has been defined the same way for literally thousands of years by virtually every civilization in history and that marriage is literally by its definition a relationship between a man and a woman.  And that if two people of the same gender want to live together, want to have a loving relationship and even want to adopt a child, in my state individuals of the same sex were able to adopt children.  In my view that’s something that people have the right to do, but to call that marriage is, in my view, a departure of the real meaning of that word.”

The presumptive GOP nominee said it is his “preference” to have a “national standard that defined marriage as a relationship between a man and a woman.”

“That would then allow states to determine what rights would be provided for people of the same gender who wanted to have a relationship,” Romney said.  “There could be domestic partnership benefits, for instance, where one state might decide to provide hospital visitation rights, another state might decide to provide that as well as benefits of other kinds.”

On Wednesday, in an exclusive interview with ABC News’ Robin Roberts, President Obama announced his decision to support same-sex marriage.  Obama told Roberts his wife, Michelle, agrees with him.  On Thursday, Romney said his wife, Ann, agrees with his stance.

Cavuto also asked Romney about a Washington Post article that details a bullying incident on a student who was presumed to be gay.  The moment was recalled by several on-the-record sources.

“First of all, I had no idea what that individual’s sexual orientation might be, going back to the 1960s that wasn’t something that we all discussed or considered, so that’s simply just not accurate,” Romney said.  “I don’t recall the incident myself but I’ve seen the reports and I’m not going to argue with that.  There’s no question that I did some stupid things in high school, and obviously if I hurt anyone by virtue of that, I would be very sorry for it and apologize for it.”

He denied hearing from any of the other students involved in the incident since the story broke.

Romney said these other issues are being used by the Obama campaign as distractions from the economy and are designed to take the American voters’ “eye off the ball.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio