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Entries in Carl Levin (3)

Thursday
Mar072013

Senator Carl Levin, Michigan Democrat, Won’t Seek Another Term

Roll Call/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Democratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, the Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman, announced Thursday evening that he will not run for reelection in 2014.

Levin, 78, said the decision for him was “extremely difficult,” but he decided with his wife that he could do a better job as a senator without campaigning.

“We decided that I can best serve my state and nation by concentrating in the next two years on the challenging issues before us that I am in a position to help address,” Levin said. “In other words, by doing my job without the distraction of campaigning for reelection.”

Levin, the senior Senator from Michigan, was first elected into the Senate in 1978.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Apr262012

McCain Calls Secret Service Scandal Briefing ‘Waste of Time’

Mark Wilson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- After a private briefing on the status of the Pentagon investigation into the Secret Service prostitution scandal, the two top lawmakers on the Senate Armed Services committee expressed disappointment over the slow pace of the investigation and a lack of concrete information to emerge.

Sen. John McCain, the ranking Republican on the committee, called Wednesday’s update on Capitol Hill, delivered by Vice Adm. William Gortney, the director of the Joint Staff, a “very disappointing briefing” and “a waste of time,” noting the dearth of concrete information about the scandal in which Secret Service agents and U.S. military personnel allegedly brought prostitutes back to their hotel rooms prior to President Obama’s arrival in Colombia for a summit with Latin American leaders.

McCain expressed frustration that despite the committee’s obligation to conduct oversight on national security issues, there were few answers.

“They wouldn’t even have information as to who was in charge on the ground in Cartagena.  It was remarkable,” McCain, R-Ariz., said.  “There are clearly implications to national security when prostitutes were in these individuals’ rooms.  [The military personnel] have the schedules of the president’s activity the following day.  We need that information.  That’s our duty to have that information and make decisions accordingly.  This briefing today gave us no details on any aspect of it.”

“Our obligation constitutionally,” McCain added, ”is oversight of the activities of the men and women in the military and our national security.  That’s the job of the Senate Armed Services committee.  Right now the Pentagon is being totally uncooperative in allowing us to fulfill those obligations.”

Sen. Carl Levin, the chairman of the committee, was more subdued, telling reporters that he thought the briefing was “sketchy” but he also explained that “it was a preliminary briefing because the [Pentagon's] investigation is not completed.”

“The military is traditionally reluctant to provide details of an investigation before it’s completed because of their fear of undo command influence and the fear of prejudicing proceedings that might be carried out under the uniform code of military justice,” Levin, D-Mich., said.  “I was surprised that it was not fuller, but they gave us the reasons for why they proceeded this way, and that’s where we’re at.”

The Pentagon did not comment after Wednesday’s briefing.

Since the scandal broke on April 13, the Secret Service has moved quickly to investigate its officers.  Already, 12 agents either have been cleared of serious misconduct, have resigned, retired, or been notified of personnel actions to permanently revoke their security clearances.  Some agents could face firing for cause.

Levin said he was told that the Pentagon’s investigation should be complete by the end of next week and that he and McCain are expecting a comprehensive update the following week.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
May062011

Sen. Carl Levin 'Deeply Disturbed' About US Aid to Pakistan

ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.), chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, told ABC News he is "deeply disturbed" about U.S. aid to Pakistan and has launched an informal investigation into whether high levels of the Pakistani government knew Osama bin Laden's whereabouts.

"We need these questions about whether or not the top level of the Pakistan government knew or was told by the ISI, their intelligence service, about anything about this suspicious activity for five years in a very, very centralized place," Levin said in an interview with ABC News.

Levin, for one, believes high levels of the Pakistani government had to know where bin Laden was.

"I think at high levels, high levels being the intelligence service, at high levels they knew it," Levin said.  "I can't prove it.  I just think it's counterintuitive not to."

This year alone, the United States gave Pakistan more than $3 billion in military and economic aid.

"Some of it is in our interest.  Some of it seems to be, is not clearly in our interest, and that's why the questions that we are asking the Pakistan government to answer need to be answered," Levin said.

As for the U.S. operation to get bin Laden, Levin said he is unconcerned that details of the story told by the White House have changed.

"There was a firefight on the first floor, and then the most dangerous guy in the world that was being captured on the third floor makes a move, which was an evasive move, guns in his room, big guns, you know, powerful guns," Levin said.  "And here's a man who sends out suicide bombers, who himself was easily expected could have a suicide vest himself and blow up the whole thing."

Levin added, "The bottom line is the right thing was done in the right way." 

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio