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Entries in Charlie Rose (2)

Sunday
Jul152012

On Economy Attacks, Obama Says He Would Say the Same in Romney’s Shoes

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Mitt Romney’s campaign against President Barack Obama has largely revolved around lackluster jobs numbers and a slow recovery out of the recession.  But in an interview aired on Sunday, Obama said he couldn’t blame his opponent for choosing that line of attack.

“That is his argument and you don’t hear me complaining about that argument,” he said. “Because if I was in his shoes, I’d be making the same argument.”

On “CBS Sunday Morning,” Charlie Rose asked the president and first lady Michelle Obama to reflect on the last four years in the White House, and where a next term could bring them. When it came to policy, Obama replied by saying that a hurdle for him had been that “one of the things you learn in this office is everything takes a little longer than you’d like.”

“We did an awful lot in the first four years,” the president said, including what he called “components we put in place” for further development of the middle class.

“The question right now for the American people is which vision, mine or Mr. Romney’s, is most likely to deliver for those folks? Because that is where the majority of American people live,” he said.

Rose looked back on the 2008 election, asking the president if something had derided the message of “hope” and “change” central to that year. Obama, who has just returned from campaign trips in Ohio and Virginia, said it was a question he was prepared to answer on the trail.

“I tell people, ‘This campaign’s still about hope.’ If somebody asks me, it’s still about change,” he replied. “Washington still feels as broken as it did four years ago.”

The president added that his most frustrating ordeal in office was trying to continue that message in the present day.

“It’s not the hard work. It’s not the, you know, enormity of the decisions. It’s not the pace,” he said. “It is that I haven’t been able to change the atmosphere here in Washington to reflect the decency and common sense of ordinary people.”

It was an issue, the president admitted, that had enough “blame to go around” for Democrats and Republicans.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jul122012

Obama’s Mistake: Not Telling a 'Story’ Better to The American People

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Despite myriad speeces and soundbites -- many in support of his still controversial Affordable Health Care Act -- President Obama said on Thursday that the biggest mistake of his first term was not being a good enough storyteller, explaining that he needed to better communicate to the American people why the policies he was pursuing mattered.

“The mistake of my first term -- couple of years -- was thinking that this job was just about getting the policy right,” Obama told CBS News’ Charlie Rose. “And that’s important, but, you know, the nature of this office is also to tell a story to the American people that gives them a sense of unity and purpose and optimism, especially during tough times.”

“When I ran, everybody said, ‘Well, he can give a good speech, but can he actually manage the job?’” he went on to explain. “And in my first two years, I think the notion was, ‘Well, he’s been juggling and managing a lot of stuff, but where’s the story that tells us where he’s going?’ And I think that was a legitimate criticism.”

Going forward, the president said he plans to spend more time outside of Washington with the American people, “listening to them and also then being in a conversation with them about where we go as a country. I need to do a better job of that in my second term.”

The president has already been ramping up his travel ahead of November’s election. He spends tomorrow and Saturday campaigning in the critical swing state of Virginia.

In his second term the president said he needs to do a better job of not just "explaining, but also inspiring."

Chiming in, the first lady added, "Because hope is still there."

With the economy struggling and unemployment still high, millions of voters have expressed hope is increasingly short supply.

The full CBS interview with the president and first lady is set to air this weekend on “CBS Sunday Morning” and Monday on “CBS This Morning.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio