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Entries in Death Penalty (3)

Thursday
Sep222011

George Bush Executed Texans at Faster Rate than Rick Perry

SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images(AUSTIN, Texas) -- Texas Gov. Rick Perry has overseen the most executions of any governor in the history of this country, but the rate at which the state of Texas has executed people was actually higher under his predecessor, George W. Bush.

Under Perry, Texas has executed 235 people over nearly 11 years -- amounting to more than 21 people per year. During Bush’s five-year tenure as governor, 152 people were executed in Texas -- more than 30 per year.

Perry has never been shy about his support of the death penalty. At a Republican debate in California earlier this month, he drew cheers from the audience when he said he loses no sleep over the executions conducted in Texas and that the death penalty serves as the “ultimate justice.”

“In the state of Texas, if you come into our state and you kill one of our children, you kill a police officer, you’re involved with another crime and you kill one of our citizens, you will face the ultimate justice in the state of Texas, and that is you will be executed,” Perry said in a debate.

In his book, Fed Up! Perry opined about the need to leave the decisions on the death penalty to the states and not to the Supreme Court.

“In the end, the states know best how they wish to punish criminals and for what crimes. Are we perfect? No,” Perry wrote. “For Washington, and in particular the Supreme Court, to step in and tell us, our friends in Louisiana, or any other state, whether it is right to execute a heinous criminal -- or tell us how to carry out justice -- is the height of arrogance and disregards federalism at its most basic level.”

In the past 10 days, four executions were scheduled to take place in Texas. One occurred early last week, and the most recent execution was carried out Wednesday evening. However, the Supreme Court also halted two Texas executions that were scheduled to take place in the past 10 days.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Sep082011

Rick Perry Receives Applause for ‘Ultimate Justice’ at GOP Debate

David J. Sams/Getty Images(SIMI VALLEY, Calif.) -- Rick Perry apparently loses no sleep over authorizing 234 executions in more than a decade as Texas' governor.

Perry has authorized more executions than any governor in the history of the United States.  He said at a Republican presidential debate Wednesday that he has never worried that the state of Texas has executed an innocent man.

“I’ve never struggled with that at all.  The state of Texas has a very thoughtful, a very clear process in place,” Perry said.  “When someone commits the most heinous of crimes against our citizens, they get a fair hearing, they go through an appellate process, they go up to the Supreme Court of the United States if that’s required.”

Perry said the death penalty should be dealt with on a state-by-state basis but supports the decision of Texas to uphold the death penalty, calling it the “ultimate justice.”

“In the state of Texas, if you come into our state and you kill one of our children, you kill a police officer, you’re involved with another crime and you kill one of our citizens, you will face the ultimate justice in the state of Texas, and that is you will be executed,” he said.

When NBC’s Brian Williams asked Perry the question about the death penalty and pointed to the 234 executions -- even before Perry answered -- the Republican debate crowd erupted in applause for the governor’s actions.  Perry pointed to the applause as indicating a vast majority of Americans supports capital punishment.

The next execution in Texas is scheduled for Sept. 15.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Friday
Oct012010

Supreme Court Begins New Term Monday; Cases Scheduled on Death Penalty, First Amendment

Photo Courtesy - Kathleen Dooher(WASHINGTON) -- Justice Elena Kagan will take the bench of the Supreme Court on Monday, joining her eight colleagues for the first day of arguments of the 2010 term.

The term's docket features a variety of issues related to the First Amendment, the death penalty, states' rights and prosecutorial misconduct, but the docket is overshadowed by what looms in the future: potential challenges to health care legislation, same-sex marriage and immigration reform. Those issues are currently working their way through the lower courts and could reach the Supreme Court next year or beyond.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio