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Entries in GOP debate (45)

Tuesday
Jan172012

Perry Camp Explains Suggestion Turkey Is Led by ‘Islamic Terrorists’

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.) -- In response to a question about whether or not Turkey should still be a part of NATO, Rick Perry suggested Monday night that some consider the country to be ruled by “Islamic terrorists.”

“Obviously when you have a country that is being ruled by what many would perceive to be Islamic terrorists,” Perry said during the GOP debate in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

Victoria Coates, foreign policy advisor to Perry, further explained the governor’s remarks, saying that some view the leaders of Turkey as Islamic terrorists due to their support of Hamas and the flotilla against Israel.

“The governor was responding to the questioners references to violence against women and to association with Hamas, I think both of which are things that many people do associate as he said with Islamic terrorists,” Coates told reporters in the spin room.  “He was referring to those things, and while he would welcome the opportunity to work with Turkey on regional issues like Syria or Iraq, this kind of behavior on the part of that country is disturbing and I think we should concerned about it.”

Asked if the leaders of Turkey have performed any actions which place them in the category of Islamic terrorists, Coates responded: "What he said was that many people associate that kind of behavior with that of Islamic terrorists.  I think also their support for the flotilla against Israel this fall.  It’s deeply concerning, and I think it’s something any future American president needs to be aware of.”

Coates said Turkey is an important country as the country serves as a “hinge point between east and west,” and is a NATO ally.

“It is certainly a topic he would cover in debate prep, particularly in terms of Syria.  I believe what he’s mentioned it before its been in terms of coping with the Syria crisis and then also as I said as a NATO ally,” Coates said.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jan172012

Perry Faces Backlash Over Daniel Pearl Comment at Debate

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.) -- Rick Perry drew criticism Monday night from at least one reporter on Twitter who took issue with the Texas governor’s use of the death of Daniel Pearl, a Wall Street Journal reporter who was beheaded in 2002, to prove a point as he defended the Marines who urinated on Taliban corpses.

“Let me tell you what’s despicable, cutting Danny Pearl’s head off,” Perry said in Monday night's GOP debate in Myrtle Beach, S.C., as he chided the Obama administration’s terming of the Marines’ actions as “despicable.”

John Harwood, a former colleague of Pearl’s at the Wall Street Journal, reprimanded Perry via Twitter, sending this tweet: “As someone who was a friend and colleague of Danny Pearl…Perry’s reference to Danny was irrelevant and gross.”

Katon Dawson, chair of Perry’s campaign in South Carolina, said Perry’s answer was effective and resonated with voters in the state.

“I think he told it just like it is,” Dawson said in the spin room.  “I think South Carolina voters understand that a strong military, a guy who wore the uniform for four and a half years, who volunteered service in the United States Air Force, who has actually been in those countries had a good perspective of it. I think it is something that is a real fact that he addressed.  I think he exposed the facts properly, addressed the question and certainly, from the applause from the audience, they agreed with it.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Jan082012

Why Mitt Romney Didn’t Get Attacked In Saturday Night’s Debate

ABC News(MANCHESTER, N.H.) -- The assumption was that Saturday’s ABC/WMUR debate was going to produce some serious fireworks.

After all, you have a front-runner who is quickly assuming the mantle of the “inevitable” nominee. If ever there was a time for his rivals to try and change the trajectory of this race, this was it.

Instead, Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Jon Huntsman took only glancing blows at Romney, while Ron Paul battled with Santorum and Gingrich.

So, why was the conventional wisdom so wrong?

1) It’s a lot easier to attack someone when you aren’t standing three feet away from him. Rick Santorum was exactly where he said he’s always wanted to be in this campaign. In the center of the stage and in the spotlight. But, he also discovered, as many others have before him, that with that new position on stage comes additional and unexpected pressures. Making an attack on the campaign trail is easy. Saying it to someone’s face is hard.

2) The Likability Factor:  For months now, the focus has been on which candidate can ultimately become the “not-Mitt” alternative. And, every week it seems, there has been a different alternative. But, voters want to do more than vote against a candidate, they want to vote FOR someone. Attacking Romney would only remind voters about what they disliked about a candidate instead of what they liked about him. Moreover, when Gingrich and Santorum go on the attack, they can come across as snide or mean, the opposite of likable.

3) The Future:  Specifically, candidates on stage had to be thinking of their political future. Did Gingrich want to be known as the candidate that did a slash and burn job on the eventual nominee or that his biting attack on Romney was turned into a devastatingly effective ad for Obama?

Don’t be fooled, just because the candidates held their fire tonight doesn’t mean that they won’t be battling Romney going forward. In fact, some already have their surrogates – the SuperPACs – doing the attacking for them in South Carolina.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan062012

Candidates Court New Voters Ahead of Saturday’s Debate

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- With the Republican field narrowing, candidates have upped their attacks on one another and on President Obama, courting groups ranging from evangelical Christians to the Tea Party from New Hampshire to South Carolina.

It is a critical time for candidates as they scurry to establish themselves as the best candidate to beat Obama, the trait most Iowa voters said they want to see in the Republican candidate.  The six candidates will go on the national stage for the first time after the Iowa caucus at Saturday’s debate, sponsored by ABC News, Yahoo and WMUR.

Unlike Iowa, where Ron Paul, Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum were tied in a three-way race in the last few days, Romney’s win in New Hampshire appears to be clear cut.

He has more than double the support of his closest rival in the state that will host the nation’s first primary.  In a new poll released on Thursday by the Union Leader, 47 percent of New Hampshire GOP primary voters said they would vote for Romney, compared to 17 percent for Paul and 13 percent for Huntsman.

But his frontunner status places Romney even more in the crosshairs.  Following a scarring defeat in Iowa as a result of Romney’s scathing negative campaign against him, Newt Gingrich is taking his gloves off and directly engaging with the former Massachusetts governor.

Gone is the pleasant Gingrich caucus goers saw in Iowa.  The former House speaker is pulling out the guns, as evident in a new 30-second TV ad his campaign rolled out Thursday in South Carolina, painting Romney as a “timid” candidate who “won’t create jobs, and timid certainly won’t defeat Barack Obama.”

Jon Huntsman, who desperately needs a win in New Hampshire, where he has concentrated all his efforts, is also doing everything he can to strip away votes from Romney.

Then there’s Rick Santorum.  Romney may have won eight more votes than the former congressman in the Iowa caucuses, but Santorum is successfully tapping into the grassroots energy and enthusiasm that has turned him into a serious contender after months of dismissal.

Santorum will face his first real vetting this Saturday when he takes on the national stage for the first time as a contender who has a real chance at defeating Romney.  He may lack the money advantage when compared to his rivals, but that could change quickly.  Santorum raised $1 million in the last 24 hours alone, almost exclusively from small-dollar contributions, and the surge in Iowa gave him a much-needed boost to his national image that he will need to do well in other states.

Ron Paul is stepping up his game as well.  As ABC News’ Jonathan Karl points out, other than Mitt Romney, no other candidate has more resources now to wage a drawn-out campaign.  Paul’s campaign raised a whopping $13 million in the fourth quarter, behind only Romney’s fundraising of more than $20 million.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan062012

Back on the Trail: Perry Eyes SC After 'Reassessing' Campaign

Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images(AUSTIN, Texas) -- In a matter of twelve hours, Texas Gov. Rick Perry wavered from being "all in," to "reassessing" his campaign, to finally settling on soldiering on in the Republican nominating contest, with his eye on South Carolina to offer the opportunity to turn around his struggling campaign. 

“The governor said what he said Tuesday night for a reason. He truly did want to assess the lay of the land regarding the Republican field, regarding South Carolina and regarding the organizational and financial situation of our campaign,” Ray Sullivan, communications director for the Perry campaign said.

Following Perry’s caucus night speech, Sullivan assured reporters further news about the state of his campaign would not come until Thursday.

Between the twelve hours that he took the stage to announce his decision to return to Texas to reassess his campaign after a fifth place finish in the Iowa caucuses and the moment he tweeted he would continue his campaign and head to South Carolina, Perry discussed his options with his family, political advisors, including Sullivan and senior advisor Joe Allbaugh, and staff on the ground in South Carolina.  

Despite the belief held by many staffers that the Texas governor would call his presidential bid quits once he returned to Texas, Perry opted to stay in the race after evaluating the political and financial dynamics of the field coupled with strong pressure from his wife, Anita.

“He wants to soldier on and believes that his record and conservative message and status as the only non-establishment Washington, outsider left in the field are good matches with the citizens of South Carolina and is committed to working hard there,” Sullivan said.

Perry, who has not held a public event since Tuesday evening, cancelled eleven events between Wednesday and Friday, at least one of which some aides expected to see a crowd larger than he had encountered in Iowa.  The GOP hopeful heads to New Hampshire Friday evening for two debates over the weekend and will fly down to South Carolina for his first event in Spartanburg Sunday afternoon, but he will begin to make his presence known in the Palmetto State before he even sets foot there. 

An aide to Perry told ABC News the campaign will begin running television ads statewide on broadcast and cable in South Carolina on Friday.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Dec162011

Bachmann Targets Gingrich in GOP Debate

ABC News(SIOUX CITY, Iowa) -- GOP frontrunner Newt Gingrich would expect his closest rival, Mitt Romney, to criticize him, but the hardest jabs Thursday night at a Republican debate in Sioux City, Iowa, came from Michele Bachmann.

The Minnesota congresswoman blasted Gingrich for being paid as a consultant to the troubled mortgage lender Freddie Mac. Bachmann also criticized Gingrich for lack of leadership when he was House speaker, saying he had a chance to defund Planned Parenthood and “chose not to take it.”  Gingrich responded by saying Bachmann “doesn’t get her facts very accurate.”  Bachmann got the last word, saying that she does get her facts right and that she is a serious candidate for president of the United States.

Gingrich expressed confidence that he should be the Republican Party presidential candidate because he can debate.  Gingrich said, “I believe I can debate Barack Obama and I think in seven three-hour debates, Barack Obama will not have a leg to stand on in trying to defend a record that is terrible and an ideology that is radical.”

When asked why he would be a "tougher" candidate than Gingrich to take on President Obama, Romney replied, "I know what it takes to get this economy going.  The president doesn't.  The proof is in his record. It's terrible. My record shows that I can get America working again."

In the final debate by the seven GOP candidates before the Jan. 3 Iowa caucuses, Romney criticized President Obama’s handling of the U.S. drone that ended up in Iran and Tehran refuses to return.  Romney called the president’s efforts to retrieve the aircraft “timid.”  The former Massachusetts governor said, “This is a president that...the spy drone being brought down, he says ‘pretty please?’  A foreign policy based on ‘pretty please?’  You got to be kidding.”

Texas Governor Rick Perry also blasted the president for his efforts in retrieving the drone, saying we should have either destroyed it or tried to retrieve it.  Perry said the president “took a third route, which was the worst and the weakest...and that is to do nothing.”

Perry has been trailing Gingrich and Romney in polls lately, but he expressed confidence and compared himself to Tim Tebow, the Denver Broncos quarterback who has engineered several fourth-quarter comebacks this season.  Perry said he hopes he’s the “Tim Tebow of the Iowa caucuses.”

This was the 13th debate of the primary season.  It was sponsored by the Fox News Channel and the Iowa Republican Party.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Dec152011

As Final Pre-Caucus Debate Looms, Iowa Race Appears Wide Open

ABC News(SIOUX CITY, Iowa) -- You might think that after months of a seemingly endless string of debates, rallies, straw polls, and other campaign events, voters in the nation’s first state to select a Republican presidential nominee might have made up their minds, but this year Iowans have other ideas.

With less than three weeks until the Hawkeye State’s caucuses and only one more debate left -- Thursday night in Sioux City, Iowa -- the GOP race still appears wide open.

“In my 30 years in Iowa, I’ve never seen a race like this,” said Enrique Pena-Velasco, a Des Moines, Iowa, businessman who has yet to decide which candidate to support.

“People here in Iowa like to get to know the candidates,” he said. “It goes beyond the politics.  It goes beyond the policies of their campaigns.  We like to get to know them on a personal level, their family, feel out what they’re like, get to have a deeper relationship with them.”

According to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll released Tuesday, Republican voters favor Newt Gingrich by a sizable margin.  The former House Speaker enjoys 40 percent support, compared to 23 percent for Mitt Romney and less than 10 percent for the rest of the candidates.  But if Gingrich is to win the GOP nomination, then he will have to overcome a series of obstacles.

Thus far, the Republican race has seen four different leaders in the last five months. In addition to Gingrich and Romney, Rick Perry and Herman Cain have also sat atop the polls this year.  Another candidate altogether, Michele Bachmann, won the first major test in Iowa -- the state’s straw poll in Ames, Iowa, last August.

And still another candidate, Ron Paul, finished a close second in Ames and, according to most prognosticators, is now in a better position than Bachmann, Perry, and Romney in the race for Iowa.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Dec102011

Republican Candidates Clash in Pivotal Iowa Debate

ABC News(DES MOINES, Iowa) -- Less than three weeks before the Iowa caucuses, six Republican presidential candidates faced off Saturday night in a high-stakes presidential debate dominated by the question of who's the most consistent conservative.

The debate, sponsored by ABC News, Yahoo! News, WOI-TV, The Des Moines Register and the Iowa Republican Party at Drake University in Des Moines, comes 24 days before the first GOP voters will reveal their preference for presidential nominee on Jan. 3.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney wasted little time going after frontrunner and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, accusing him of being a "career politician" with unusual -- at times liberal -- ideas.

"Speaker Gingrich and I have a lot of places where we disagree," Romney said. "We can start with his idea...to have a lunar colony that would mine minerals from the moon...He said that he would like to eliminate in some cases the child labor laws so that kids could clean schools... His plan in capital gains, to remove capital gains for people at the very highest level of income ..."

"But our real difference, I believe, is our backgrounds -- I spent my life in the private sector," Romney said, before turning to blast Gingrich as a Washington insider.

"The only reason you didn't become a career politician is because you lost to Teddy Kennedy in 1994," Gingrich replied, going on to offer a robust defense of his agenda.

But Romney didn't back down.

"If I had been able to get in the NFL as a kid, I would have been a football star too. But I spent my life in the private sector. We don't need folks who are lifetime Washington people to get this country out of the mess it's in -- we need people outside Washington, outside K street," he said, jabbing at Gingrich's experience.

Paul also took a jab at Gingrich.

"He's been on so many positions on so many issues," he said, noting Gingrich's support for a single-payer health care system, TARP funds and even accepting money from Freddie Mac, a government agency. "You might have a little bit of trouble competing with me on consistency."

Michele Bachmann also piled on Gingrich, attempting to paint him as a Washington insider by asserting that his office was located on "the Rodeo Drive of Washington D.C., K Street" -- a street lined lobbyists' offices.

Then she created a stir by introducing a new tag line for her rivals, lumping them all together as "Newt Romney" for their support of an individual health care mandate, cap and trade and illegal immigration.

Gingrich immediately countered by saying Bachmann's comments were "simply untrue."

"I fought against 'Obamacare' every step of the way. I think it's important for you -- and this is a fair game. It's important for to you be accurate when you say those things. I did no lobbying," Gingrich told Bachmann.

But, the congresswoman wasn't having it, coming back with another attack.

"This is such an important issue. We have one shot. Do we honestly believe two men who stood on this stage and defended 'Romneycare' and an individual mandate? Are they honestly going to get rid of it in 2012?" Bachmann said. "It's going to be a very heavy lift."

The debate -- the 12th for the Republican candidates this year -- comes at a crucial moment, as Gingrich continues a dramatic surge in the polls and ousted frontrunner Romney and his allies launch scathing attacks from all sides.

Gingrich leads the pack with 33 percent support among likely caucus goers in Iowa, according to the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll. Romney and Paul are trailing in Iowa at 18 percent each.

The former House speaker also holds impressive leads in two other key early states -- South Carolina and Florida -- with 23 percent support among likely GOP primary voters, according to the most recent CNN-Time magazine polls.

He is also positioned well in hypothetical 2012 match-ups with President Obama in swing states Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania, new Quinnipiac University polls found.

Turning to the issue of the candidates' individual character, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who has been running ads in Iowa touting his family values and long-time marriage, took a veiled jab at Gingrich, who has been married three times and has admitted marital infidelity.

"If you cheat on your wife, you'll cheat on your business partner, so I think that issue of fidelity is important," Perry said.

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum said he believes "character" is important, before Gingrich was given the opportunity to respond, saying voters need to "have a feeling that this is a person that they can trust with the level of power we give to the presidency."

"I think people have to render judgment -- I've said in my case, I've made mistakes at times -- I'm also a 68-year-old grandfather and I think people have to measure what I do now," Gingrich said.

Halfway through the debate, the spat between Romney and Gingrich flared over the issue of Israel and personal friendship with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Gingrich defended the controversial comments he made Friday, when he said the Palestinian people were "invented." He said Saturday night that his statements were "factually correct."

"Is it historically correct? Yes. Are we in a situation where every day rockets are fired into Israel while the United States -- the current administration, tries to pressure the Israelis into a peace process. Hamas does not admit the right of Israel to exist and says publicly not a single Jew will remain," Gingrich said.

"It's fundamentally time for somebody to stand up and say enough lying about the Middle East," he said.

Romney said Gingrich's comments were reckless, and that he was speaking for Israel.

"We stand with the Israeli people. We are going to tell the truth, but we are not going to send incendiary words into a boiling pot when our friends the Israelis would say, 'What are you doing?'" Romney said.

Gingrich, looking at Romney in disbelief, retorted that he "did not speak for the people of Israel, I spoke as a historian," adding he has known Bibi Netanyahu since 1984, calling the Israeli prime minister by his nickname.

Romney countered, "I've also known Bibi for a long time," adding that they worked together at Boston Consulting Group.

"I will exercise sobriety," Romney said. "I wouldn't do anything that would alter this process. Before I do that, I get on the phone with my friend Bibi Netanyahu."

When Perry was given the chance to speak, he called the uproar over Gingrich's remarks a "minor" issue blown up by the media, channeling Gingrich's attacks on the media from other debates.

"This president is the problem, not something that Newt Gingrich said," he said.

Later, the candidates were asked about their childhood struggles and experiences through which they can identify with economically struggling Americans.

Romney admitted he "didn't grow up poor," but said his parents -- his father was the governor of Michigan, George Romney -- instilled a strong work ethic in their children because he "grew up with a dad that's poor."

Bachmann told a story she's told before, recounting her parent's divorce, which she called a "tragedy" that so many families in the country go through.

"My mom was a fulltime homemaker with four kids and we went below the poverty line overnight," mentioning that she had to start working at a young age.

"I know what it's like for single moms to struggle," Bachmann said. "We are still coupon-clippers today. ... We get what that feels like."

The very last question thrown at the candidates was what they have learned from one of their onstage rivals.

Rick Santorum said it was Newt Gingrich. As a 30 year old running for Congress—he won his first race at 32—he said he listened to Gingrich's audio tapes which helped him win that first race.

Rick Perry said it was fellow Texan, Ron Paul, who got him first "intrigued in the federal reserve."

"Congressman Paul is the individual on the stage that got me the most interested in a topic that I found most interesting," Perry said. "And I thank you for that," before adding that he also learned from the "people of this country."

Romney chose not to mention another candidate he learned from, but said he admired the movement that Paul has inspired mentioning when he goes to a debate the only signs he sees even in the freezing cold are Ron Paul signs.

"That enthusiasm in people that's exciting to watch," Romney said.

Gingrich said the governor of Iowa who was sitting in the second row was his role model, although not an opponent.

"Get out of politics for awhile..too old too experienced, to tied to the past, win the governorship decisively." As for a rival onstage he had learned from: Rick Santorum because he had the "courage to tell the truth about the Iranians for a long time."

Bachmann mentioned Herman Cain, who left the race last week.

"You can't have a debate without mentioning 999 in a debate," Bachmann said adding that it's the "power of being plain spoken."

"I'm going to go with win, win, win instead of 999," Bachmann said.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Dec102011

Republican Debate: Twitter Loves Romney’s $10,000 Wager

ABC News(DES MOINES, Iowa) -- It wasn’t quite an “oops” moment, and the Romney campaign is insisting it wasn’t a gaffe, but Mitt Romney’s attempt to make a $10,000 bet with Rick Perry has already taken on a life of its own.

If the buzz in the press filing center, on the Internet and on Twitter and other social media platforms is any indication, Romney’s going to be hearing the replay of that quip over and over again.

An analysis from Bluefin Labs shows that just under 40 minutes into the ABC News debate in Iowa, 3,400 messages on Twitter were prompted by Mitt Romney’s offer to bet with Rick Perry.

The hashtag #what10Kbuys, suggested by the Democratic National Committee, is now trending on Twitter -- around the world.

In the post-debate spin room, Romney aides are standing by the comment: "Romney made that bet because he knew Rick Perry wouldn't take it,” strategist Eric Fehrnstrom said.

And another top adviser, Stuart Stevens, called the line "a very human thing to do to get someone to shut up when they're not telling the truth."

But in the social media world, Romney’s line has been the subject of criticism from pundits on the right, the left, and in between.

A senior Democratic strategist offered ABC News this comment: “Mitt Romney is going to rue the day he offered a $10,000 bet in this debate.  Talk about a window in to his out-of-touch soul.  And he did it in the same debate where he again called the payroll tax cut for the middle class a temporary band-aid.  You just can’t be more out of touch than Mitt Romney – and you can’t have a less understanding of what it’s like to be middle class.”

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Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Dec102011

GOP Debate: Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich Take First Jabs

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images(DES MOINES, Iowa) -- Less than three weeks before the Iowa caucuses, six Republican presidential candidates faced off Saturday night in a high-stakes presidential debate dominated by the question of who's the most consistent conservative.

The debate, sponsored by ABC News, Yahoo! News, WOI-TV, The Des Moines Register and the Iowa Republican Party at Drake University in Des Moines, comes less than a month before the Iowa Caucus, the first official test of primary preference in the country, scheduled for Jan. 3.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney wasted little time going after frontrunner Newt Gingrich, accusing him of being a "career politician" with unusual -- at times liberal -- ideas.

"Speaker Gingrich and I have a lot of places where we disagree," Romney said. "We can start with his idea to have a lunar colony to mine minerals from the moon ... child labor laws so kids could clean schools ... remove capital gains for the wealthiest Americas...

"But our real difference is in our backgrounds," Romney said, turning to blast Gingrich as a Washington insider.

"The only reason you didn't become a career politician is because you lost to Teddy Kennedy in 1994," Gingrich replied, going on to offer a robust defense of his agenda.

But Romney didn't back down.

"If I had been able to get in the NFL as a kid, I would have been a football star too. But I spent my life in the private sector. We don't need folks who are lifetime Washington people to get this country out of the mess it's in -- we need people outside Washington, outside K street," he said, jabbing at Gingrich's experience.

Paul also took a jab at Gingrich.

"He's been on so many positions on so many issues," he said, noting Gingrich's support for a single-payer health care system, TARP funds and even accepting money from Freddie Mac, a government agency. "You might have a little bit of trouble competing with me on consistency."

The debate -- the 12th for the Republican candidates this year -- comes at a crucial moment, as Gingrich continues a dramatic surge in the polls and ousted frontrunner Romney and his allies launch scathing attacks from all sides.

Gingrich leads the pack with 33 percent support among likely caucus goers in Iowa, according to the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll. Romney and Paul are trailing in Iowa at 18 percent each.

The former House speaker also holds impressive leads in two other key early states -- South Carolina and Florida -- with 23 percent support among likely GOP primary voters, according to the most recent CNN-Time magazine polls.

He is also positioned well in hypothetical 2012 match-ups with President Obama in swing states Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania, new Quinnipiac University polls found.

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Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







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