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Entries in Ken Buck (4)

Tuesday
Oct262010

Colorado Sen. Candidate: ‘Disagree with Separation of Church and State’

Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- For at least the third time during the 2010 campaign, a Tea Party-backed U.S. Senate candidate is drawing fire from his Democratic opponents for publicly opposing a rigid separation of church and state.

“I disagree strongly with the concept of a separation of church and state,” Colorado Republican Ken Buck said at a senatorial candidate forum last year.  The comments resurfaced recently after liberal blog Think Progress posted them.

“It was not written into the Constitution,” Buck says of separation. “While we have a Constitution that is very strong in the sense that we are not going to have a religion that's sanctioned by the government, it doesn't mean that we need to have a separation between government and religion. And so that, that concerns me a great deal.”

Buck has advocated for a closer relationship between faith-based groups and government, telling a group of Tea Party members in July that secularism in the U.S. is a “very scary concept” and that “the key to a democracy is that we have a public ethic, that we have a public morality.”

Buck’s view of the constitutionally-permissible relationship between religion and government is shared by many conservative Constitutional scholars and other Tea Party candidates, including Sharron Angle of Nevada and Christine O’Donnell of Delaware.

The First Amendment states that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." But it does not specifically state that there should be a "separation of church and state" as has been popularly construed.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Oct162010

Sparks Fly Between Conservative Candidates in Colorado

Photo Courtesy - Buck for Colorado(DENVER) –- Two years after Barack Obama won Colorado in the 2008 election, leaving many to declare it a new blue state, Democrats are struggling to hold on to their seats as they face the same public ire that Republicans did two years ago.

Incumbent Sen. Michael Bennet, who replaced Ken Salazar last year, is in an uphill battle against Republican candidate and Tea Party favorite Ken Buck.

In a debate moderated by ABC News' Jake Tapper and KMGH anchor Mike Landess, Bennet struggled to distance himself from the Obama administration, painting himself as a moderate as Buck accused him of running away from his record.

"I have been more likely to vote with the other party than any other member of the congressional delegation, whether they're Democratic or whether they're Republican," said Bennet. "And on some critical issues for Colorado, I fought the administration."

Buck, on the other hand, fought back against the argument that he's reversed his position, including on health care.

"I haven’t reversed positions, but I have talked about issues in different ways," Buck said. "Sometimes it's a matter of learning more about issues. Sometimes it's a matter of using different language to try to explain the same situation."

Bennett and Buck are locked in a tight race that will come down to who can win over more independent voters who comprise a large chunk of the state's electorate.

Democrats are having a hard time edging up in polls not only in the Senate race but also in several House races. But where they do see a ray of hope is in the gubernatorial race, where Denver Mayor Hickenlooper leads by double digits.

In a race fraught with fighting among conservatives, pollsters say Hickenlooper is looking at an easy victory to replace exiting Gov. Bill Ritter, who decided not to seek reelection.

At Friday's fiery debate between Democrat John Hickenlooper, Republican Dan Maes and the American Constitution Party's Tom Tancredo, fireworks sparked between Maes and Tancredo as the Republican candidate accused the former member of Congress of sneaking onto the ballot "like an illegal immigrant."

Businessman Maes rode to victory on the back of the Tea Party's support, narrowly defeating another GOP establishment favorite, former Rep. Scott McInnis.

Tancredo quit the GOP and declared himself a candidate of the American Constitution Party despite calls from Maes and other Republicans who feared it would split the vote. The former congressman's move did divide the Republican Party, essentially paving an easy path for Hickenlooper.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Friday
Oct152010

Colorado Senate Candidate Struggles for Votes

Photo Courtesy - United States Senate/Michael Bennet(DENVER) -- Democrats in Colorado are struggling to hold onto their seats as they face the same public ire that Republicans did two years ago when President Obama won the state in the 2008 election.  Incumbent Sen. Michael Bennet, who replaced Ken Salazar last year, is facing an uphill battle against Republican candidate and Tea Party favorite Ken Buck.

With the two locked in a tight race, it will come down to how they perform in the debates Friday and whether they can win over independent voters who comprise a large chunk of the state's electorate.

ABC News' Jake Tapper and KMGH anchor Mike Landess will moderate Friday's debate between Bennet and Buck, as well as a debate between gubernatorial candidates Democrat John Hickenlooper, Republican Dan Maes and the American Constitution Party's Tom Tancredo.

Buck has attacked Bennet as a Washington insider closely aligned with Obama's agenda, even though the incumbent has attempted to portray himself as an independent and more of a moderate.

Bennet, in turn, has criticized his opponent for calling Social Security a "horrible policy," a comment that Buck later retracted, and his comments that the Department of Education isn't necessary.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Oct122010

Senate Candidate Faces Questions About Rape Case

Photo Courtesy - Buck for Colorado(DENVER) -- Colorado Senate candidate Ken Buck is taking heat for not prosecuting a rape case five years ago on the basis there wasn’t enough evidence.

The victim was a college student at the University of North Colorado when she was allegedly raped by an ex-boyfriend while drunk in her home. This week, she released tapes of her meeting with Buck, then a Weld County district attorney, who argued there is not enough "proof beyond reasonable doubt" to take the case up to the jury.

Buck told the victim  even though she never said yes to sex with her suspect, it appeared to be consensual because she called him over and had a prior relationship with him. Buck also warned the victim against filing any other motions because “it will be very public, publicly covered event.”

The conservative candidate has often been the target of women’s groups for his stance on abortion. He has argued abortion should be illegal even in the cases of incest and rape. Earlier this year, he supported an amendment to the state constitution that would directly challenge the federal government over fetus rights, although he later changed his position.

Buck is a Tea Party favorite who defeated the Republican establishment favorite’s Lt. Gov. Jane Norton in the primary. Multiple polls show him ahead of his Democratic opponent, Michael Bennet.

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







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