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Entries in New Hampshire (150)

Saturday
May112013

Rand Paul and Bobby Jindal Visit Early Primary States

United States Senate(WASHINGTON) -- It may seem like the 2012 presidential race just ended, but two Republicans stoked speculation that they could be in the running in 2016 when they addressed groups Friday evening in the two earliest of early states: Iowa and New Hampshire.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., addressed the Iowa Republican Party’s Lincoln Day Dinner in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, while Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal headlined a fundraiser for the Republican Senate Majority Committee in Manchester, the campaign committee for the 13-member GOP caucus in the New Hampshire state Senate.

Jindal gave a blunt prescription for a more successful Republican Party, telling the crowd at the Manchester Radisson that he won’t just attack the president and feed the crowd “bright, red meat.” Instead, he focused on “where do we go as a Republican Party.”

“We lost an election that we probably should have won,” Jindal said. “It’s time to get over it. … I think we can win elections by sticking to our principals, but I do think we need to make some changes and I think we need to think seriously about where we go from here.”

Jindal warned the crowd of Republicans to look “forward,” not backwards, and, in a clear reference to Mitt Romney’s failed attempt at the White House, said Republicans must “fight for every single vote, not 53 percent to 47 percent, we need to fight for 100 percent, we need to fight for every single vote."

“We need to have the confidence and we need to have the courage to say our principals, our policies, our beliefs help every American join the middle class, and if we want voters to like us we’ve got to like them first,” Jindal said. “Let the the Democratic Party start dividing people by groups, by subgroups, by special interests. We will have none of that. We view everybody as Americans first, and we are going to treat them like that.”

Jindal spent most of his speech on two topics: improving education in this country with more school choice and charter schools, as well as persuading Republicans to quit the austerity talk and focus on “growth and opportunity” and growing the middle class.

On education, a topic Jindal often talks about in both Louisiana and nationally, he told the audience to “let the dollars follow the child, don’t make the child follow the dollars.” He added that a “bright teacher in the classroom is the single most important thing we can do.”

Jindal also spent part of his address speaking about his family and personal story, noting his father grew up in India with no running water or electricity and was the first person in his family to go to school past the fifth grade.

“We spent too much time last year criticizing the other side without saying what we were going to do instead, without saying what we were for,” he said.

“We allowed them to characterize us instead of saying we stand for the middle class,” Jindal said. “We want everybody to have that American dream that my dad pursued, that your parents and grandparents pursued.”

“This is more than just winning an election,” he said. “This is about winning a very important debate where we go as a country.”

He told those listening to take that into account before they supported future candidates.

“As we decide the candidate we support, the leaders we rally around … I would hope we would rally around those candidates and those leaders who stand for what is right, not just what is popular,” Jindal said.

He did not mention the possibility that he might be included in that group of future candidates.

Paul’s speech focused on two issues he has been closely aligned with recently: the investigation into the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, 2012, as well as comprehensive immigration reform.

The Kentucky senator’s Benghazi comments were expected after he took former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to task earlier Friday for her handling of the terrorist attacks. In an op-ed article in the Washington Times, he wrote that Clinton “should never hold high office again,” and he repeated that charge in Cedar Rapids Friday night, earning a huge cheer from the crowd.

“There were a lot of mistakes made at the time,” Paul said. “Maybe at the time, maybe after the time, cover up this and that. But what was always been most important to me is what happened in the six months leading up to this, because there is no excuse in the six months leading up to this when your people on the ground – military people and State Department people – are asking for more help. They are asking for security, they are pleading for security and they got nothing. It was inexcusable, it was a dereliction of duty and it should preclude her from holding higher office.”

When discussing immigration, Paul noted that not everyone in the room would agree with him, including Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, and Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, who spoke before Paul.

“I am in favor of immigration reform,” Paul said.

He added that he could vote for immigration reform legislation if more border security was added.

“Am I worried a little bit about it? Yes. I’m worried I might offend some people,” Paul told the group of Iowans. “I’m also worried [about] whether it works or not, if it doesn’t work, and the people who vote for it will catch blame for it. But I don’t want to just say I’m voting no and I’m not going to be for it. I do want to try and fix it, because I think there is a problem.”

Like Jindal, Paul said Republicans need to grow the party and be the party of all Americans, adding, “we need to attract the Latino vote. This is a very practical thing and I’m not ashamed to admit it. ”

“We need to attract the African-American vote,” Paul said, noting his appearance at historically black Howard University last month. “We need to change the way we are talking about it and who we are if we want to attract the Latino vote. … We need to treat immigrants with dignity and respect.

“We will get people to consider us as a party,” he said, “but they won’t if we don’t show up.”

Paul reprised many of the themes of a speech he gave in March when he first endorsed comprehensive immigration reform, saying, “If you want to work in our country, I want to find a place for you to work.”

“The people are here and there is a certain sense of de facto amnesty in that they are not going home, and their kids will be voting, and if their kids think we are hostile to them, they are never going to vote for us,” Paul said. “We are an increasingly diverse nation and I think we do need to reach out to people who don’t look like us, who don’t wear the same clothes, aren‘t exactly who we are. We need to reach out."

In a sense, it was a homecoming for Paul. The Iowa GOP leadership is made up of loyalists from his father Ron Paul’s 2012 campaign. After the botched reporting of the 2012 caucus results that initially put Mitt Romney on top, only to be corrected two weeks later with Rick Santorum as the true victor, the old players were out after the cycle, replaced by the top members of Paul’s Iowa team, including the present Iowa GOP chairman A.J. Spiker, who served as vice chairman of Ron Paul’s 2012 campaign.

Both Paul and Jindal, along with Hillary Clinton, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and others are already the subject of speculation as potential presidential contenders in 2016, but as recently as January, Jindal said it was way too soon for speculating.

“Any Republican that’s thinking about running for president in 2016 needs to get his head examined,” Jindal told reporters after delivering a speech at the Republican National Committee winter meeting in January.

In that same speech, he had some tough language for his party.

“We must stop being the stupid party,” he said. “It’s time for a new Republican Party that talks like adults. It’s time for us to articulate our plans and visions for America in real terms. We had a number of Republicans damage the brand this year with offensive and bizarre comments. We’ve had enough of that.”

Jindal mentioned that speech Friday night in New Hampshire, noting his 9-year-old son made him put a dollar in the “bad word jar” after that phrase was heavily covered. He said what he “meant by that that was we’ve got to present thoughtful policy solutions to the American people … not just 30 second solutions.”

Paul will also head to New Hampshire later this month to headline a fundraiser for the state GOP on May 20.

While he is in Iowa this weekend, he is also planning on meeting with the Iowa Federation of Republican Women and attend a fundraiser for Iowa’s Johnson County GOP.

It may be worth noting that, according to Kentucky law, unlike other states, a candidate cannot run for both the U.S. Senate and president of the United States simultaneously, so Paul will have to choose one in the coming years.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Nov272012

Transgender Lawmaker Also a Convicted Felon, Asked to Resign

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Republicans in New Hampshire’s state legislature have called for the first elected transgender official in the state -- and the nation -- to step down in light of a newspaper article that revealed her criminal past.

Stacie Marie Laughton, a Democrat, made history this month when she was elected to a seat in the New Hampshire House of Representatives from Hillsborough County, which includes Nashua. But a story in the Laconia Daily Sun revealed that Laughton was a convicted felon who served more than four months in jail for ”conspiracy to commit  credit card fraud” in 2008.

Candidates can run for office in New Hampshire after they’ve been convicted of a felony as long as they are not incarcerated and have completed any court-ordered sentence, according to the New Hampshire Secretary of State’s Office.

Granite State House Majority Leader Pete Silva, R-Nashua, said Laughton’s failure to inform  Nashua voters about her background before the election was grounds for her resignation, according to the Nashua Patch.

“While I believe in a person’s ability to be rehabilitated and become a productive member of the community, I also believe it is a candidate’s duty to fully disclose their personal history to allow the voters an opportunity to make an informed decision,” Silva wrote in a statement published by the Nashua Patch. “Ms. Laughton failed to give the voters of her district that very basic amount of trust and respect.”

New Hampshire Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley disputed whether Laughton needed to resign.

“The outgoing Majority Leader needs to accept the defeat dealt to him on November 6th and come to terms with the fact that he only has two weeks left in office,” Buckley said, according to the Nashua Patch. “The people have spoken and they roundly rejected Bill O'Brien and Pete Silva's extreme agenda and it is now time to move New Hampshire forward, away from their divisive policies and tactics that moved us backwards for two years.

In a letter to the editor from August 2009, when Laughton was running for a city council seat in Laconia, she introduced herself as Stacie and said that after going through “a rocky last couple of years,” she was bringing a new outlook on life to the table.

“I have made mistakes in my personal life, but I have paid my debt to society, and I believe that through that it has made me stronger and it should not damage my ability to be a city counselor,” Laughton wrote. “And I ask the people of Laconia to ask questions to me so that they may know both sides of the story due to the fact that the press likes to tell only one side of what goes on.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Republicans in New Hampshire’s state legislature have called for the first elected transgender official in the state – and the nation – to step down in light of a newspaper article that revealed her criminal past.

Stacie Marie Laughton, a Democrat, made history this month when she was elected to a seat in the New Hampshire House of Representatives from Hillsborough County, which includes Nashua. But a story in the Laconia Daily Sun revealed that Laughton was a convicted felon who served more than four months in jail for ”conspiracy to commit  credit card fraud” in 2008.

Candidates can run for office in New Hampshire after they’ve been convicted of a felony as long as they are not incarcerated and have completed any court-ordered sentence, according to the New Hampshire Secretary of State’s Office.

Granite State House Majority Leader Pete Silva, R-Nashua, said Laughton’s failure to inform  Nashua voters about her background before the election was grounds for her resignation, according to the Nashua Patch.

“While I believe in a person’s ability to be rehabilitated and become a productive member of the community, I also believe it is a candidate’s duty to fully disclose their personal history to allow the voters an opportunity to make an informed decision,” Silva wrote in a statement published by the Nashua Patch. “Ms. Laughton failed to give the voters of her district that very basic amount of trust and respect.”

New Hampshire Democratic Party Chairman Ray Buckley argued against Republican calls for Laughton’s resignation. 

“The outgoing Majority Leader needs to accept the defeat dealt to him on November 6th and come to terms with the fact that he only has two weeks left in office,” Buckley said, according to the Nashua Patch. “The people have spoken and they roundly rejected Bill O'Brien and Pete Silva's extreme agenda and it is now time to move New Hampshire forward, away from their divisive policies and tactics that moved us backwards for two years.

In a letter to the editor from August 2009, when Laughton was running for a city council seat in Laconia, she introduced herself as Stacie and said that after going through “a rocky last couple of years,” she was bringing a new outlook on life to the table.

“I have made mistakes in my personal life, but I have paid my debt to society, and I believe that through that it has made me stronger and it should not damage my ability to be a city counselor,” Laughton wrote. “And I ask the people of Laconia to ask questions to me so that they may know both sides of the story due to the fact that the press likes to tell only one side of what goes on.”

Tuesday
Nov202012

Former New Hampshire Senator Warren Rudman Dies at 82

United States Congress(CONCORD, N.H.) – Former New Hampshire Senator Warren Rudman passed away on Monday. He was 82.

Rudman served as senator for 12 years, leaving his seat in 1993. One of his many career highlights included the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings budget-cutting law. Prior to the Senate, he served as the state’s Attorney General for six years.

Memorial services are to be held both in Washington and in New Hampshire.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Nov062012

Romney Closes Out Campaign with Final Rally in New Hampshire

Darren McCollester/Getty Images(MANCHESTER, N.H.) -- Mitt Romney held his final rally of his campaign Monday just before midnight struck, telling a thunderous crowd in Manchester, N.H., that it will be the Granite State that helps him win the White House.

“That is quite a welcome!” Romney told the crowd of more than 12,000 slapping noisemakers and waving signs.  “This is a special moment for Ann and for me because this is where our campaign began.  You got this campaign started a year and a half ago at the Scammon Farm.”

“And then your primary vote put me on the path to win the republican nomination,” he said.  “And tomorrow your votes and your work right here in New Hampshire will help me become the next president of the United States!”

Romney’s campaign was launched in Stratham, N.H., in June 2011, and he has returned to the state more than 23 times this year alone.  He essentially camped out in the state in the days and weeks prior to the January primary.  Romney, who also owns a home in New Hampshire, spent weeks in the state over the summer too.

“Together we must lead America to a better place,” Romney said at the rally, his fifth of the day.

“We’re one day away from fresh start, one day away from the first day of a new beginning,” he said.  “My conviction is that better days are ahead and that’s not based on promises and hollow rhetoric but on solid plans and proven results, and on an unshakeable belief in the greatness of the American spirit.”

Musician Kid Rock played at the rally, performing live his signature song “Born Free,” which Romney adopted early on as his campaign song.  Standing on top of a grand piano, Rock screamed the lyrics into the microphone as the Romney’s approached the podium.

“I have to say thank you to Kid Rock.  Let me tell you, we are kids of Detroit, Kid Rock and I are, and Mitt is a kid of Detroit and we love Michigan, we love Kid Rock, we love that he stood up for us and helped us out for all this time,” Ann Romney said.

“It’s been a long journey; it started in New Hampshire a year and a half ago, our hearts are full, and what we have learned by going on the trail is we’ve seen the America that you all love, that we all love, we feel it’s in danger, we feel it’s slipping away from us.  I love this country, I love the people I’ve seen in this country but more than anything I have loved hearing the voices of the women that I’ve heard all across this country,” she said.

“I have to tell you so many women are hurting in this economy and I have some hope for you because guess what, hope is on the way and it starts tomorrow!” Mrs. Romney said.

Mitt and Ann Romney will vote first thing Tuesday morning in their hometown of Belmont, Mass., before Romney heads to Ohio and Pennsylvania for last minute stops before the polls close.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Nov062012

Obama, Romney Tie in New Hampshire's Dixville Notch

Alex Wong/Getty Images(DIXVILLE NOTCH, N.H.) -- The first votes are in -- 10 of them, anyway -- and it’s an Obama-Romney tie.

The small hamlet of Dixville Notch in New Hampshire distinguishes itself every primary and general election by voting right at midnight.

This year, 10 voters showed up and they split evenly -- five votes apiece -- for President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

Obama won the Dixville Notch vote in 2008.  But in elections before that, the town had stuck to more conservative candidates, twice selecting a Republican instead of Bill Clinton.

Dixville Notch and its 10 voters may be symbolic, but they’re not a bellwether for the state.  Obama won in Dixville Notch in 2008, but that was the first time a majority of the town went for a Democrat in 40 years.

The other New Hampshire town with midnight voting -- the slightly more populous (32 voters) Hart’s Location -- swung towards Obama Monday night: 23 Obama, 9 Romney.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov052012

Obama on Final Campaign Swing, Jokes He’s Just a ‘Prop’ for Voters

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images(CONCORD, N.H.) -- President Obama kicked off his final 48-hour push to the finish line Sunday morning in New Hampshire, telling a crowd of 14,000 that at this stage in the campaign he’s just “sort of a prop in the campaign.”

“It’s now up to you,” he said at his last rally in the Granite State, where he was once again joined by former President Bill Clinton.  “That’s how a democracy works, right?  That ultimately, it’s up to you.  You have the power.  You are shaping the decisions for this country for decades to come.  Right now.  In the next two days.”

The president departed the White House for the last time before Election Day Sunday morning and spent close to 11 hours in the air Sunday as he flew from New Hampshire to rallies in Florida, Ohio and Colorado.

“We’ve made real progress,” Clinton told the masses outside the State House in Concord.  “Compared to what could have happened, Barack Obama has done a good job… With a tough hand, he has done a good job.”

Stealing a line from another former president, Clinton praised Obama’s record as a “decider-in-chief,” citing his decision to bail out the auto industry and push for health care reform.

Clinton continued to suggest GOP nominee Mitt Romney isn’t trustworthy.  Summing up his proposals, Clinton said Romney is telling voters, “Don’t pay much attention to what our solutions are… Look at me, I look like a president and I talk like one and I’m telling you it’s all gonna be all right.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Oct312012

Romney Chooses NH for Site of Final Rally Before Election Day

Darren McCollester/Getty Images(TAMPA, Fla.) -- Mitt Romney will hold his final campaign rally in New Hampshire, the very state in which he launched his bid for the White House 16 months ago.

The “Victory Rally” will be held in Manchester, N.H., at 9:30 p.m. on Monday night, Election Day eve.  Campaign-theme song artist Kid Rock will be the special guest.

It is no mistake that New Hampshire was chosen for the final event of Romney’s candidacy.  The campaign -- as well as the candidate and his family -- have a long history with the Granite State.

New Hampshire was the state where Romney launched his presidential campaign that spring day in June 2011, surrounded by hay bales and a picturesque farm house.  It was also where he chose to relaunch his campaign after it became clear he would become the nominee earlier this year in April.

And the lakeside town of Wolfeboro, located in northern New Hampshire, became a retreat for the candidate throughout the campaign, whether it was for time away with family at his home there or for meetings with advisers on his porch overlooking Lake Winnipesaukee.

Romney has held more than 20 events in the state this year alone -- and many more last year in the days leading up the primary he won.

During the course of his campaign, he scooped ice cream in Milford, dropped by diners in Manchester and visited lumber yards in Madison.  He was endorsed by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in Hanover, N.H., toured fishing boats in Portsmouth and hosted a spaghetti dinner in Tilton.

And so on Monday, the campaign will end right where it started.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Oct282012

President Obama Hits Mitt Romney for ‘Cradle to Grave Tax Hikes, Fees’

SAUL LOEB/AFP/GettyImages(NASHUA, N.H.) -- President Obama delivered his final pitch to voters Saturday in the Live Free or Die state, accusing rival Mitt Romney of being untrustworthy, and slamming his record of “cradle to grave tax hikes and fees” as governor of neighboring Massachusetts.

“During Gov. Romney’s campaign for governor down there, he promised the same thing he’s promising now, said he’d fight for jobs and middle class families,” Obama said. “But once he took office, he pushed through a tax cut that overwhelmingly benefited 278 of the wealthiest families in the state and then he raised taxes and fees on middle class families to the tune of $750 million. Does that sound familiar to you?

“There were higher fees to be a borrower, higher fees to become a nurse. There were higher fees for gas, there were higher fees for milk, there were higher fees for blind people to get a certificate that they were blind,” Obama said.

“He even raised fees to get a birth certificate — which would have been expensive for me,” he joked, alluding to the conspiracy theories about the authenticity of his own birth record.

“He raised fees for marriage certificates and fees for funeral homes,” Obama continued. “So there were literally cradle to grave tax hikes and fees.”

A study by the nonpartisan National Conference of State Legislatures found that in 2003, the first year of Romney’s tenure in Massachusetts, the state imposed roughly $500 million in higher fees, more than any other state. Mortgage-recording fees increased from $36 to $158; driving permits increased from $15 to $30; and marriage licenses went from $4 to $50, the study found.

The Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation estimated that new fees and loophole closures raised $750 million per year between 2003 and 2007. Romney did not approve any formal tax increases, contrary to Obama’s suggestion, though his critics argue there is little difference between fee hikes and taxes.

In a new web ad released in conjunction with the speech, the Obama campaign playfully lists roughly half of the more than 1,000 fees raised or created under Gov. Romney.  The campaign also created a website to publish all of the increases, which Democrats argue hit the middle class hardest.

Romney campaign spokesman Ryan Williams called Obama’s line of attack “laughable.”

“As governor, Mitt Romney worked with Democrats to close a $3 billion deficit, balance four budgets while cutting taxes 19 times, create tens of thousands of new jobs, and lower the Massachusetts unemployment rate to 4.7 percent,” he said.

While Obama did not mention the net job gains or lower unemployment rate under Romney’s tenure, he did take aim at the record of job creation vis a vis other states in the country.

“When he left office, there were only three states in the country that had created fewer jobs than Massachusetts,” Obama said. “And by the way, one of them was Louisiana that had been hit by Hurricane Katrina. He talked a lot about small businesses, but Massachusetts when he was governor ranked 48th in small business creation, and one of the two states that ranked lower was Louisiana.”

“So this is a guy who has a track record of saying one thing and doing something else,” Obama concluded.

The event marked Obama’s sixth visit to New Hampshire this year. State campaign officials told ABC News this is his last visit here before the Nov. 6 election.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Aug062012

Romney Runs Errands, Shopping List in Hand

Win McNamee/Getty Images(WOLFEBORO, N.H.) -- With a shopping list in hand, Mitt Romney spent Monday morning -- heading out just after 8:30 a.m. -- running errands, stopping by a hardware store for insect repellent and popping into a grocery store to restock on soda and yogurt.

After spending about 10 minutes inside the local Bradley’s Hardware Store, Romney emerged, bucket in hand, where reporters peppered him with questions about what he had purchased inside.

“Hardware stuff,” Romney responded, laughing, before climbing into his SUV.  A closer look at the bucket revealed that it was some sort of rodent deterrent.

The next stop was the local grocery store, where Romney sifted through a large container of corn before choosing two and heading inside.

Directing a shopping cart to the back of his waiting SUV, he unloaded cases of Diet Coke and Diet Wild Cherry Pepsi, Poland Spring water bottles and two plastic bags filled with groceries.

Asked what he bought, Romney responded, “Groceries,” and laughed.

The presumptive GOP nominee said he planned to make his own dinner Monday night, and said that he had some “folks coming over today.”  An aide later said that some of Romney’s senior advisors would be meeting with the candidate at his home.

When asked if any of his house guests were Tim Pawlenty or Rob Portman -- both rumored to be vice presidential short-listers -- Romney demurred, chuckling.

He then took off on foot across the parking lot, darting into Rite Aid Pharmacy before re-emerging to apologize to a woman who had been blocked in by his motorcade.

“I’m sorry for blocking you in there,” said Romney, who was balancing his iPhone to his ear and clutching a plastic bag in his other hand.  “I don't know about these guys," he added, motioning to the Secret Service agents.

"It's because you're a very special person," the woman told Romney, giving him a thumbs up.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jul142012

While President Obama Rallies, Mitt Romney Sits Lakeside With iPad

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WOLFEBORO, N.H.) — Mitt Romney spent part of his Saturday morning sitting in a lawn chair barefoot on the beach of his New Hampshire lake house, iPad in hand, while President Obama was on the campaign trail.

It was the first glimpse of the presumptive Republican presidential nominee since Friday afternoon, when he arranged last-minute interviews with five television networks to deny claims by the Obama campaign that he lied about when he relinquished control of his private equity firm, Bain Capital.

All week, the attacks had plagued Romney, who had not come out himself against the accusations until the round of interviews Friday. Romney has said the attacks have distracted from the real issue of the campaign: the economy.

Romney, who last held a public event on Wednesday, does not have any events scheduled this weekend. He is expected to campaign next on Tuesday in Pennsylvania after a fundraising swing in Louisiana and Mississippi.

While President Obama is campaigning for a second day today in the battleground state of Virginia, a Romney aide said the candidate would be spending time at home.

On Friday evening, one of Romney’s senior adviser’s was spotted near the New Hampshire resort town, though it was not immediately clear whether a meeting had occurred with Romney.

Dressed in jeans, a blue dress shirt and his trusted iPad propped on his lap and headphones on, Romney sat on the shore of Lake Winnipesaukee, his son Josh and one of his 18 grand children next to him.

Romney then went back into his home and reemerged in workout gear — dark shorts, dark t-shirt, sneakers and white athletic socks — and could be seen roaming around his lawn where he retrieved a bike pump and a bike helmet, which he placed on his head as he walked around the house.

The candidate appeared to be helping his son and some of his grandkids prepare for a bike ride. It was not clear if Romney himself joined, but at least two Secret Service agents were also spotted on the property with bikes.

Ann Romney was also spotted at the home, dressed in workout clothes and picking up toys off the lawn before putting her arms around her grandson and helping him play golf.

One of Romney’s other sons, Matt, could be seen standing at one of the home’s bay windows with a pair of binoculars pointed toward the lake, where several passersby would slow their boats to snap photos of the home as they passed, a Coast Guard boat idling nearby.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio