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Entries in No Child Left Behind Act (5)

Sunday
Feb262012

Rick Santorum: Mitt Romney Wrong on ‘Host’ of ‘Principles’

ABC News(NEW YORK) -- GOP presidential candidate Rick Santorum admitted Sunday on This Week that his vote to support No Child Left Behind was against his principles.

“Well, looking back on it, that was the case,” Santorum said in regards to if the vote violated his principles. “And I said, you know, that was—that’s not what I believe in.”

Santorum explained during a recent presidential debate that, “sometimes you take one for the team.” He used his appearance on Sunday to call into question Mitt Romney’s “principles.”

“Governor Romney is not only wrong on the issue of education with the federal government and the state government having, you know, basically micromanaged it from the top down,” Santorum said. “He’s also wrong on a whole host of other principles of government involvement in the health care system, government involvement in energy and manufacturing with cap-and-trade and as he proudly proclaimed that he was going to put the first carbon cap in the country.”

Santorum also responded to his answer in a recent GOP presidential debate about his support of No Child Left Behind.

Romney chided him for his vote during the debate, but Santorum dismissed those attacks.

“If you look at my record, in particular on education, what I’ve been proposing and fighting for is to get the federal government out of the education system, actually get the state less in the education business and bring it back to families and communities. And here in, you know, where education should be,” Santorum said. “Governor Romney defends No Child Left Behind and supports it today.  I don’t, because it’s against the principles I believe in. It’s obviously not against the principles that Governor Romney—I have principles. I have principles that support the basic foundational principles of our country.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Sep222011

Obama Offers States a Break From ‘No Child Left Behind’

Creatas Images/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Tired of waiting for Congress to reform the education law "No Child Left Behind,” President Obama is taking matters into his own hands. On Friday, the president will announce that he is giving states the option to opt out of some of the toughest requirements of the federal education law, so long as they adopt reforms that the White House deems necessary.

“Today, state and local school districts are buckling under the law’s mandates and too many schools are destined to fail,” a senior administration official said Friday. “This fall, the administration will provide flexibility from the law in exchange for a real commitment to undertake change. The purpose is not to give states and districts a reprieve from accountability…but rather to unleash energy to improve our schools at the local level, even as Congress works to reform the law.”

The president will urge states to apply for waivers of the NCLB requirement that schools prove students are proficient in math and reading by 2014 or risk being labeled failures. In exchange, states must show they are committed to certain reforms, including adopting college and career-ready academic standards and linking teacher evaluation to student performance. States must also create an accountability system that reports the lowest performing schools and the largest achievement gaps.

The current law -- approved by Congress with overwhelming support in 2001 and signed by President George W. Bush in 2002 -- requires students to be measured through standardized tests. States currently set their own standards for academic success and may risk loss of federal funding if they fail to show adequate yearly progress in achieving their goals. Critics, including the Obama administration, claim the current system encourages states to lower, or “dummy down,” standards so they can report better progress.

“Instead of fostering progress and accelerating academic improvement, many No Child Left Behind requirements have become barriers to state and local implementation of reforms,” the administration official said.

The president originally asked Congress for a bill by the start of the new school year, but the reauthorization has stalled in both the House and Senate.

“We are now a month into the new school year and, while we appreciate the individual efforts of various members of Congress, we still don’t have a bipartisan bill to replace No Child Left Behind,” a senior administration official said. “The reality is another school year’s starting under a broken law.”

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Aug082011

Obama to Offer States A Break From 'No Child Left Behind'

Creatas/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- With efforts to overhaul “No Child Left Behind” stalled in Congress, the White House announced Monday it will offer states waivers from the federal education law, so long as they show progress in making education reforms.

“What we want to do is put forward a very simple trade-off,” Education Secretary Arne Duncan told reporters at Monday’s White House press briefing. “Where there's a high bar, where folks are really doing the right thing for children, we want to give them a lot more flexibility; frankly, get out of their way and let them hit that higher bar.”

The current law -- approved by Congress with overwhelming support in 2001 and signed by President George W. Bush in 2002 -- requires students to be measured through standardized tests. States currently set their own standards for academic success and may risk federal funding if they fail to show adequate yearly progress in achieving their goals.

Critics, including the Obama administration, claim the current system encourages states to lower, or “dummy down,” standards so they can report better progress.

“We have low expectations and states that have moved down as opposed to up expectations for our children. And we also have a punitive system that does not allow for reform. In fact, it's a cookie-cutter system that is not allowing our students to move forward,” Obama’s domestic policy adviser, Melody Barnes, said.

By offering a break from the legislation, the White House hopes states will be encouraged to make further reforms, even if it means their testing scores go down.

The president sent Congress a proposal to revamp the legislation 16 months ago, but little progress has been made. On Monday, the Secretary had a hard time explaining the hold up on Capitol Hill.

“This should be bipartisan,” Duncan said. “We would love to see Congress act -- no question that it should have happened. We hope it happens some point down the road, but it hasn't, and we can't afford to wait.”

The White House plans to finalize the waiver system over the next few weeks and present a plan at some point in September. Every state can apply but will have to show they are committed to reforms and standards designed to prepare students to be college- and career-ready.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Mar152011

Will Obama's Timeline to Reform No Child Left Behind Get Schooled?

Creatas Images/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Reforming the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law might be one of the few things that Republicans and Democrats can agree on, but with budget battles brewing on Capitol Hill, getting it done might not be so easy.

President Obama urged Congress earlier this week to send him a new education law by the time students head back to school this fall. On Tuesday, Obama came out in defense of that deadline, arguing that, despite budget concerns, education is "an investment in our future."

"We think that the time is now to do it and there's no reason why we shouldn't be able to get it done by August," Obama said in an interview with ABC affiliate KOAT-TV in Albuquerque, N.M.

Although there is bipartisan support for reforming NCLB, education policy experts and lawmakers alike criticized the president's "arbitrary" timeline.

"We need to take the time to get this right -- we cannot allow an arbitrary timeline to undermine quality reforms that encourage innovation, flexibility, and parental involvement," House Committee on Education and the Workforce chairman Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., said Monday.

Mike Petrilli of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, an educational policy think tank, said the deadline, while perhaps unrealistic, helps shine a spotlight on the issue.

"I think that's useful. This is what president's do; they create a sense of urgency," he said. "But I don't think many insiders have much optimism that deadline will be met."

Beyond the timeline, the biggest challenge facing reform of NCLB is the budget battle brewing on Capitol Hill. In fiscal year 2010 the bill cost more than $12 billion, a number that may be hard for many to tolerate in a year when all federal spending seems to be on the table.

The president, however, said education is worth the price. He also noted that the reform doesn't necessarily mean more spending.

"Reform doesn't always mean more money, in some cases it's a matter of, 'Are we using resources more wisely?'" he said.

While the details of a reform bill remain unclear, the shortcomings of NCLB are well known.

The current law -- approved by Congress with overwhelming support in 2001 and signed by President George W. Bush in 2002 -- requires students to be measured through standardized tests. Currently, states set their own standards for academic success and may risk federal funding if they fail to show adequate yearly progress in achieving their goals.

Critics, and the Obama administration, claim the current system encourages states to lower, or "dummy down," standards so they can report better progress.

Today, according to the administration, 37 percent of America's schools are not meeting their annual targets mandated by NCLB. That number could more than double to more than 80 percent of schools in 2011, according to the Education Department.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Mar142011

Obama Wants Fixes to 'No Child Left Behind' Before Next School Year

ABC News(ARLINGTON, Va.) -- President Obama is calling on Congress to send him a bill to fix No Child Left Behind that he could sign into law before the next school year begins.

"We've got to get it right," Obama said Monday at Kenmore Middle School in Arlington, Va.

"I want every child in this country to head back to school in the fall knowing that their education is America's priority."

While admitting that the goals of No Child Left Behind were correct, the president cited specific fixes to the program that he says can make education better and more successful for children, parents, and students.

"We need to not only hold failing schools accountable, we need to help turn those schools around. In the 21st century, it's not enough to leave no child behind. We need to help every child get ahead," Obama said. "What hasn't worked is denying teachers, schools, and states what they need to meet these goals."

President Obama outlined the changes that he would like to see:

  • Efforts to boost teacher effectiveness and to focus on results for students.
  • New ways to recruit, prepare, evaluate, and retain the best teachers.
  • Greater flexibility to support innovation and improvement in education.
  • System of incentives, rewards, and reorganization for schools making significant strides in helping children succeed.


The president admitted there currently "isn't a lot of money to go around," but said that this is one area that cannot be cut, amid the debates being waged on Capitol Hill over the budget.

"We can't be reckless and we can't be irresponsible about how we cut. Let me make it plain: We cannot cut education," Obama said.

The president said that sacrificing the nation's commitment to education in the budget would be like sacrificing the country's future.

"I will not let it happen," the president concluded.

Before his speech the president visited a classroom and spoke briefly to the students. He admitted that around this time -- in middle school -- it was "probably a time when I was at my worst," he said, adding that he was in trouble in the principal's room often.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio