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Entries in NRSC (2)

Tuesday
Feb282012

NRSC Insists They Are ‘Well Positioned’ to Win Senate Majority 

Ann Heisenfelt/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman Sen. John Cornyn (Texas) said Tuesday that despite the retirement of Sen. Olympia Snowe (Maine), Republicans remain “well-positioned to win back a Senate majority in November.”

“Maine has a proud history of electing independent leaders, including a Republican governor in 2010, and while this will be a key battleground in the fall, I am confident it will remain in Republican hands,” Cornyn said.

The full statement from the NRSC chairman reads:

“Olympia Snowe has served her beloved state of Maine, and our country, with strong principles and great distinction for many years. As both a friend and a colleague, she will be missed, and I wish both her and her husband Jock all the best as they embark on the next chapter in careers dedicated to public service.

"While I would never underestimate the fight ahead in defending any open Senate seat, Republicans remain well-positioned to win back a Senate majority in November. Maine has a proud history of electing independent leaders, including a Republican Governor in 2010, and while this will be a key battleground in the fall, I am confident it will remain in Republican hands.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Oct072010

Republican Senatorial Committee Pulls Ad as Democrats Demand Apology 

The National Republican Senatorial Committee is pulling its "Stop Obama" ad in West Virginia amid complaints from Democrats that it insults the state's residents. GOP Senate candidate John Raese also called the ad "ridiculous" in an attempt to distance himself from the controversy. Courtesy - ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- The National Republican Senatorial Committee is pulling its "Stop Obama" ad off the air in West Virginia  amid a controversy over the casting call which reportedly asked for actors with a "'hicky' blue collar look." GOP Senate candidate John Raese called the ad "ridiculous," in an attempt to distance himself from the hullabaloo.

"The ad is ridiculous and I am happy to say that no one with the Raese campaign had anything to do with it. As a matter of fact, we asked that it be taken down long before it went public," said Raese's spokesman, Kevin McLaughlin. "But this campaign isn't about TV ads, it's about the 7,169 West Virginia seniors who are being told they are losing their health coverage because of Obamacare that Joe Manchin rubber stamped."

The ad's existence was first reported by Politico's Mike Allen. According to his report, the casting call for the ad asked for actors with a "'hicky' blue collar look...think coal miner/trucker looks."

The "Stop Obama" ad included professional actors and was made in Philadelphia. But it was word of the casting call's language that particularly fired up Democrats.

Gov. Manchin, whose standing in the polls has plummeted amid an anti-Washington wave, called the ad insulting to West Virginians and demanded an apology. 

Copyright 2010 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio