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Entries in Small Businesses (5)

Wednesday
Jul252012

RNC Steps Up ‘You Didn’t Build That’ Attacks

Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The Republican National Committee is again joining forces with its friends at the Romney campaign, continuing the “you didn’t build that" push on Wednesday with a new web video.

While the campaign has 24 events in swing states with small business owners, the RNC’s video adds more of what the president said earlier this month instead of just using the “you didn’t build that" line, which they’ve been pushing and using out of context for more than 10 days.

The clip begins and ends with the words, “The more context you get, the worse it sounds.”

The rest of the video is more of what the president said in Roanoake, Va., on July 13, when he stressed the importance of community as well as continued government investments in infrastructure and public services that many businesses in this country utilize.

“If you’ve been successful, you didn’t get there on your own, ” Obama said.  “You didn’t get there on your own.  I’m always struck by people who think, well, it must be because I was just so smart.  There are a lot of smart people out there.  It must be because I worked harder than everybody else.  Let me tell you something -- there are a whole bunch of hardworking people out there.  If you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help.  There was a great teacher somewhere in your life.  Somebody helped to create this unbelievable American system that we have that allowed you to thrive.  Somebody invested in roads and bridges.  If you’ve got a business, you didn’t build that.  Somebody else made that happen.”

“President Obama thinks his comments are being taken out of context, but the reality is the context makes it worse,” RNC Chairman Reince Priebus said in a statement.  “With more context, it is obvious President Obama doesn’t understand that businesses succeed because of the hard work and sacrifice of the American people, not the growth and intrusiveness of government.  President Obama thinks he can paint over his latest admission, but he can’t cover up four years of anti-business actions.  From his comments to entrepreneurs that ‘you didn’t build that’ and the private sector is ‘doing fine’ to failing to meet with his jobs council and failing to hold Daily Economic Briefings, it’s clear Obama’s lack of concern for our economy is quite clear.”

On Tuesday, the Obama campaign released an ad with the president refuting the “you didn’t build that” attacks and accusing Republicans of intentionally misleading the public saying his words have been “taken out of context.”

“Of course Americans build their own businesses,” Obama says in the video, looking directly at the camera.  “Every day, hard-working people sacrifice to meet a payroll, create jobs, and make our economy run.”

“And what I said was that we need to stand behind them, as America always has,” Obama said in the ad that will run in six swing states.

The RNC's web video seems to be a direct response to the president’s ad from Tuesday and it’s a new tweak to the messaging.  It seems that the committee no longer needs the line to be completely taken out of context to press its message that the president doesn’t stand by small business owners.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jul242012

Obama: Republicans Have ‘Tipped a Little Bit over Their Skis’ with 'You Didn't Build That' Attacks

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(PORTLAND, Ore.) -- President Obama went on the defensive Tuesday over his understanding of small business owners,  saying Republicans, “may have tipped a little bit over their skis” in using his own words against him.

“Earlier today Gov. Romney was at it again. He’s been twisting my words around to suggest I don’t value small business,” Obama said of the presumptive GOP presidential nominee at a campaign fundraiser inside the Portland Convention Center, the second time in as many days he has hit back at the Republican attacks.

At issue is a July 13th campaign speech in Roanoke, Va. during which President Obama said, "Look, if you’ve been successful, you didn’t get there on your own. You didn’t get there on your own. I’m always struck by people who think, ‘Well, it must be because I was just so smart.’ There are a lot of smart people out there. ‘It must be because I worked harder than everybody else.’ Let me tell you something: There are a whole bunch of hardworking people out there. If you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help...If you've got a business -- you didn’t build that. Somebody else made that happen."

The Obama campaign at first made no attempt to distance itself from the line -- that is until Gov. Romney and others got wind of it, saying it perfectly illustrates Obama's feeling that government, not small businesses or American innovation is the root of all economic success. The now-infamous line has the Obama campaign in full damage control mode, and has the campaign running ads claiming Romney misquoted the president -- even though Obama's words were already public record. Tuesday was the president's latest attempt to do just that.

“In politics you have to endure certain amount of spin," Obama said at the Portland fundraiser. "Everybody does it; I understand it. Those are the games that are played in campaigns,” he said. “Although I have to say, when people omit entire sentences from a speech and they start splicing and dicing, they may have tipped a little bit over their skis.”

As their attacks on "you didn't build that" have grown in volume, the president’s campaign has begun to more aggressively and defensively point out that the “that” to which Obama was referring was the American infrastructure system.

“If you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help.  There was a great teacher somewhere in your life.  Somebody helped to create this unbelievable American system that we have that allowed you to thrive.  Somebody invested in roads and bridges.  If you’ve got a business. You didn’t build that.  Somebody else made that happen.  The Internet didn’t get invented on its own.  Government research created the Internet so that all the companies could make money off the Internet,” Obama said in Roanoke, Va.

in a statement to ABC News, Romney campaign spokesman Ryan Williams fired back, "President Obama said that business owners ‘didn’t build’ their companies, and he meant it. People across this country agree that government isn’t responsible for building our nation’s businesses. It’s just the latest detached remark from an out of touch president who has consistently made life more difficult for job creators and middle-class workers.”

The president’s rebuttal to Romney on the issue of small businesses for a second straight day suggests heightened concern among Democrats that negative Republican portrayals of Obama might be taking hold.

“I believe with all my heart that it’s the drive and ingenuity of Americans who start businesses that lead to their success,” Obama said, testifying to his support for small business owners before a friendly crowd. “I believe in the ability for someone who’s willing to work hard and turn ideas into a profitable business, that’s what makes us such a robust economy.”

And as he did in a new campaign TV ad released earlier Tuesday, the president also tried to clarify his view on the role of government investment in public services and infrastructure as part of a plan to help businesses succeed.

“The idea that what it takes to give our people and businesses best possible chance at success involves individual initiative,” he said, “But also us as a nation working together to create a platform for success.

“Mr. Romney disagrees with this, and he’s entitled to his opinion. But the approach that he’s talking about is not going to help small businesses and it’s not going to create more markets for large businesses. He is wrong,” Obama said. “We did not build this country on our own, we built it together. And if Mr. Romney doesn’t understand that then he doesn’t understand what it takes to grow this economy in the 21st century.”

Gov. Romney and his campaign have insisted even the spirit of what Obama said shows a fundamental misunderstanding of the economy. On CNBC Monday night, Romney himself said even if one believes the "you didn't build that line" was taken out of context, that doesn't help the president's argument. "I found the [whole] speech even more disconcerting than just that particular line," Romney said. "The context is worse than the quote."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Jul242012

Obama Accuses Romney of 'Twisting My Words' on Small Businesses

Alex Wong/Getty Images(SAN FRANCISCO) -- For the past week, Mitt Romney has slammed President Obama for saying of small business owners, “you didn’t build that.”  On Monday night, Obama fired back, accusing his GOP rival of “splicing and dicing” his words for political gain.

“Earlier today, Governor Romney was at it again, knowingly twisting my words around to suggest that I don’t value small businesses,” the president told supporters in Oakland, Calif.

“In politics we all tolerate a certain amount of spin.  I understand these are the games that get played in political campaigns.  Although, you know, when folks just like omit entire sentences of what you said -- they start kind of splicing and dicing -- you may have gone a little over the edge there,” he said.

Obama was referring to recent attacks by Romney that suggest the president has denigrated small business owners and their pursuit of the American Dream.

Speaking in Roanoke, Va., 10 days ago, the president said: “If you were successful, somebody along the line gave you some help…Somebody helped to create this unbelievable American system that we have that allowed you to thrive.  Somebody invested in roads and bridges.  If you’ve got a business -- you didn’t build that.  Somebody else made that happen.”

"The point is, is that when we succeed, we succeed because of our individual initiative, but also because we do things together," he said at the time.

Republicans and the Romney campaign have since seized on Obama’s “you didn’t build that” line.

Earlier on Monday, Romney, also in California, convened a roundtable of business leaders beneath a banner bearing the slogan “We did build it!” -- a mocking reference to Obama.

"I hear it time and again, people say as you did, that they think business is the enemy or that business is getting a free ride.  And there's a sense that some of you are bad guys,” Romney said alluding to the president.  “I see you as the good guys.  You're employing people and hiring people.”

On Monday night, Obama tried to clarify.

“I believe with all my heart that it is the drive and the ingenuity of Americans who start businesses that lead to their success.  I always have and I always will,” he said.

What makes small businesses successful is a strong and growing middle class, he said, accusing Romney of pursuing policies that only look out for the wealthy.

“Mr. Romney's plan is to gut these investments just so that he can give more tax breaks to millionaires and companies that are shipping jobs overseas.  He thinks that's the best way to grow the economy.  He thinks that's the best way to help small businesses.  And I've got to tell you he is dead wrong.  We did not build this country from the top down.  We built this country together,” Obama concluded.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
May162012

Obama Pushes 'To-Do List' For Congress

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- President Obama is urging lawmakers to put politics aside and act on his “handy to-do list” for Congress in order to sustain the economy’s momentum.

“One of the ways we can sustain momentum is for Congress to take some actions right now -- even though it's election season, even though there's gridlock, even though there's partisanship -- take some actions right now that would really make a difference,” the president told small business owners during a visit to a local D.C. sandwich shop Wednesday morning.  

President Obama called for lawmakers to pass legislation that would give small businesses a 10 percent income tax credit for hiring new employees or raising the salaries of existing employees, one of the five items on his wish list for Congress. The president’s action plan revolves around a series of economic initiatives he has been pushing for months, but that have gained little traction on Capitol Hill.

“My message to Congress… is let's go ahead and act to help build and sustain momentum for our economy. There’ll be more than enough time for us to campaign and politick. But let's make sure that we don't… lose steam at a time when a lot of folks like these are feeling pretty optimistic,” Obama told the small group gathered at Taylor Gourmet.

The president made his pitch ahead of his White House meeting with Congressional leadership Wednesday afternoon. In addition to urging the leaders to act on his economic proposals, the president said he was “going to offer them hoagies while they’re there.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Mar042011

House Passes Repeal of 1099 Requirement of Health Care Law

Comstock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The House of Representatives voted Thursday to repeal the 1099 mandate of the health care reform law that Republicans say tangles small business owners in red tape and hampers job creation.  But Democrats say the repeal will reduce federal revenues created by the health care reform law and increase taxes on the middle class.

The vote on H.R. 4 -- the Small Business Paperwork Mandate Elimination Act -- passed Thursday afternoon by a count of 314-112, with 76 Democrats joining a unanimous House GOP to strike the requirement.

Enacted by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to help off-set costs of the law, the 1099 provision stipulates that corporations that are not tax-exempt report payments of $600 or more, creating nearly $22 billion in federal revenue over the next 10 years.

According to the Joint Committee on Taxation, the repeal would increase federal budget deficits by $21.9 billion over 2011-2021.  In order to make up for those lost revenues, the Republicans’ legislation sought to modify the health care reform law’s repayment schedule for a portion of health care tax credits received by recouping subsidies to purchase insurance provided to lower- and middle-income families if their income grows beyond certain levels.

After the vote, Speaker of the House John Boehner said in a statement that he was pleased that the House once again is fulfilling another promise from the GOP’s Pledge to America.

“The 1099 mandate has been a major source of uncertainty for small businesses trying to grapple with the costs and consequences of the government takeover of health care,” Boehner said.  “Having run a small business, I know how Washington mandates like this one can threaten jobs by increasing costs, creating uncertainty, and burying employers in red tape and paperwork.”

“By repealing the 1099 mandate, we are continuing to listen to the American people and taking another step towards creating a better environment for job creation in America,” Boehner added.

The Senate passed its own repeal of the 1099 mandate Feb. 2, but the House did not take up the Senate’s legislation.  The fate of the 1099 is uncertain since the two chambers will have to reconcile their differences and agree on the same legislative language.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio