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Entries in Steve Cohen (2)

Friday
Feb152013

Rep. Steve Cohen Confesses to Secret Daughter

cohen.house.gov(WASHINGTON) -- Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., was spotted trading tweets with a young woman during the State of the Union address and his “ilu” signoffs -- digital shorthand for "I love you" -- prompted inquiries into the identity of the congressman’s tweet mate.

Cohen, who initially told WMC-TV in Memphis, Tenn., that the woman was the daughter of a friend, has now confessed that the woman -- Victoria Brink -- is his daughter whom he learned about three years ago.

Cohen, who is not married, conducted a private briefing in his office with reporters from NBC and CBS Thursday evening to set the record straight.

“I googled her mother, found out she had a child and the math looked pretty accurate,” Cohen told reporters in his office, according to NBC’s  account of the briefing.  “The mom told me we had a lot of catching up to do.”

Cohen, 63, said he has taken his daughter, who is 24 and an aspiring swimsuit model, on a tour of the Capitol and to a White House Christmas party.

After trading tweets with Brink Tuesday night, Cohen quickly deleted the posts.  But the tweets were archived by Politwoops.  Brink has also deleted the tweets she traded with Cohen.

When Brink notified Cohen that she was watching the president’s address, the congressman replied, “pleased you are watching. ilu.”  Cohen followed up with “nice to know you were watchin SOTU(state of the union).Happy Valentines beautiful girl. ilu.”

Cameras inside the House chamber spotted Cohen using his phone during the president’s address.

Michael Pagan, the congressman’s communications director, did not immediately return phone calls or emails on Friday.  An aide answering the phone in Cohen’s congressional office said Pagan was unavailable.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jan202011

No Apology Here: Congressman Cohen Defends Nazi Comment

Photo Courtesy - ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Congressman Steve Cohen, D-Tenn., says he has no intention of apologizing for comparing Republican rhetoric with Nazi propaganda.

“I didn’t say anything that deserves an apology or requires an apology,” Cohen told ABC News.  “I would never refer to Republican colleagues in an untoward way, I was talking about political propaganda.”

Cohen’s comments on the House floor – where he said Republican arguments on health care were “a big lie just like Goebbels” and “like blood libel” that led to the holocaust -- were condemned by the Anti-Defamation League (ADL).

“No matter how strong one’s objections to any policy or to the tactics of political opponents, invoking the Holocaust and the Nazi effort to exterminate the Jewish people is offensive and has no place in a civil political discourse,” said ADL National Director Abraham Foxman in a statement issued in response to Cohen’s statement.

“I respect Mr. Foxman greatly, we have a little difference on how we see this,” Cohen said.  “I wasn’t talking about the political philosophy or even the actions that resulted in the actions of the Holocaust, I was talking about the political propaganda, which is somewhat separate, but I understand Mr. Foxman’s sensitivities and I’m sorry that he and other people of the Jewish faith could have been offended.”

Does that mean Cohen is sorry for what he said?  Not quite.

“I’m sorry that people were offended,” Cohen said.  “I’m not sorry for what I said.”

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio