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Entries in U.S. (4)

Monday
Jun202011

White House Touts Growing Foreign Direct Investment In The US

ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- Despite recent signs that economic growth is slowing, the White House is touting foreign direct investment in the U.S. in an effort to convince the public, and voters, that the president’s policies will help create long-term growth.

Foreign direct investment in the U.S. rebounded from 2009 levels and grew by 49 percent in 2010, according to a new report from the White House Council of Economic Advisers, but still not enough to reach the 2008 level. The U.S. continues to be the number one destination for foreign investment worldwide.

“At a time where we need to use every tool in our toolbox to continue to put Americans back to work and grow the economy here at home, promoting foreign direct investment is an important opportunity to accelerate our economic recovery,” President Obama said in a written statement.

According to the White House, foreign-based companies create well-paid jobs for American workers and boost job creation. In the U.S. there are 5.7 million workers employed at these foreign direct investor plants, including 13 percent of the entire American manufacturing workforce. These are jobs that pay well. The average pay is over $70,000 per worker, over 30 percent higher than the average pay.

President Obama is encouraging foreign investors to keep it coming. “My administration is committed to ensuring that the United States continues to be the most attractive place for businesses to locate, invest, grow, and create jobs.  We encourage and support business investment from sources both at home and abroad,” the president said in a statement underscoring his administration’s commitment to an open investment policy.

“In a global economy, the United States faces increasing competition for the jobs and industries of the future.  Taking steps to ensure that we remain the destination of choice for investors around the world will help us win that competition and bring prosperity to our people. Consistent with our national security and while ensuring a level playing field for American investors, we will do just that,” he said.

The report finds that the U.S. is attractive because of its open economy and very low barriers to foreign direct investment. Last year close to 90 percent of foreign direct investment came from Canada, Europe and Japan, according to the report.

“This remains the most competitive and most desirable place for investment in the world and that investment has had a great impact on the economy,” CEA Chairman Austan Goolsbee told reporters Monday.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Sunday
May082011

White House: U.S. Won't Increase Presence in Libya

MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- In an interview with ABC News’ Christiane Amanapour, President Obama’s National Security adviser Tom Donilon insisted that the United States would not increase its presence in Libya due to NATO's success in protecting the embattled nation's civilians.

"NATO is still running this operation now, we're supporting it," Donilon told Amanpour. "They have the assets that are needed for them to engage in the civilian protection mission, and they are engaging."

Recalling NATO's ineffective war policy in Bosnia, where the U.S. "gave the Europeans the lead and they weren't able to protect the civilians," Amanpour asked if the United States policy of "leading from behind" will be ineffective in achieving the desired results in Libya.

"Will the U.S. step up more involvement?" Amanpour asked the White House National Security Adviser.

"No," responded Donilon. "When the president made this decision, there was an immediate threat to 700,000 Libyan civilians in the town of Benghazi. We've had a success here in terms of being able to protect those civilians. Now we need to continue that civilian protection mission and continue to put the pressure on Gadhaffi."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Saturday
May072011

GOP Weekly Address: Sen. Brown Commends Military on bin Laden Killing

Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- The killing of Osama bin Laden was the main focus of the weekly Republican address, which was delivered on Saturday by U.S. Senator Scott Brown (R-Mass.).

Senator Brown said while bin Laden’s death can’t compensate for the loss of lives at the hands of the al Qaeda leader, it is “always a victory” when Justice has the final word.

“This was a man who rejoiced in the suffering and death of others, who set in motion all the horror and grief of 9/11 and considered it just a start,” Brown said. “He was a teacher of evil, and now, for him, the lesson is over. It ends not in the fulfillment of some fanatical vision, but in the depths of the Arabian Sea.”

Brown commended members of the U.S. military and the intelligence community for their role in the killing of bin Laden, and said that anyone seeking to do Americans harm will be dealt with.

“The operation was a model of sustained, concentrated military action, and the example will not be lost on other terrorists,” he said. “Any escape they make will be temporary. Any sanctuary they find will be uncovered.  Those who harm or threaten the American people will be dealt with, on our terms, however long it takes.”

The Massachusetts senator said one lesson that can be learned from the killing of bin Laden by Navy SEALs in Pakistan early Monday is that commitment to even the hardest objectives is rewarded.

“We all heard it said that bin Laden was beyond our reach, in some remote corner of the earth, and after almost a decade we could surely never find him. Let me tell you it’s always a mistake to bet against American resourcefulness and determination.”

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Mar272011

Gates: Was Not 'Vital National Interest' to Intervene in Libya

Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Secretary of Defense Robert Gates said that Libya did not pose a threat to the United States before the U.S. began its military campaign against the North African country.

On ABC's This Week, when asked if Libya posed an actual or imminent threat to the United States, Gates responded, "No, no."

In a joint appearance with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, their first since the Libya operation began, Gates said, "It was not -- it was not a vital national interest to the United States, but it was an interest and it was an interest for all of the reasons Secretary Clinton talked about. The engagement of the Arabs, the engagement of the Europeans, the general humanitarian question that was at stake."

Gates explained that there was more at stake. "There was another piece of this though, that certainly was a consideration. You've had revolutions on both the East and the West of Libya," he said, emphasizing the potential wave of refugees from Libya could have destabilized Tunisia and Egypt.

During his campaign for the presidency, in December, 2007, Barack Obama told The Boston Globe that "The president does not have power under the Constitution to unilaterally authorize a military attack in a situation that does not involve stopping an actual or imminent threat to the nation."

Earlier in 2007, then-Senator Hillary Clinton said in a speech on the Senate floor that, "If the administration believes that any -- any -- use of force against Iran is necessary, the President must come to Congress to seek that authority."

ABC News’ Jake Tapper asked Clinton, "Why not go to Congress?"

"Well, we would welcome congressional support," the Secretary said, "but I don't think that this kind of internationally authorized intervention where we are one of a number of countries participating to enforce a humanitarian mission is the kind of unilateral action that either I or President Obama was speaking of several years ago."

Gates said it is unknown just exactly how long operations in Libya would last. The United States has been at war in Afghanistan for almost ten years, at war in Iraq for almost eight years and at war in Libya for nine days.

On the humanitarian side, the defense secretary said significant progress has been made.

President Obama has called for Libyan leader Muammar Gadhafi's departure, but regime change is not one of the goals of the United Nations-led military operations. Tapper asked about this seeming inconsistency.

"So why not have, as part of the mission, regime change, removing Gadhafi from power?" Tapper asked the Secretary of Defense.

"Well, first of all, I think you don't want ever to set a set of goals or a mission -- military mission where you can't be confident of accomplishing your objectives," he said. "And as we've seen in the past, regime change is a very complicated business. It sometimes takes a long time. Sometimes it can happen very fast, but it was never part of the military mission."

Clinton emphasized the humanitarian rationale for the U.S. military intervention in Libya, recalling instances from recent history when a lack of U.S. intervention had left hundreds of thousands dead.

Clinton said that the United Nations-backed military intervention in Libya "is a watershed moment in international decision making. We learned a lot in the 1990s. We saw what happened in Rwanda. It took a long time in the Balkans, in Kosovo to deal with a tyrant. But I think in what has happened since March 1st, and we're not even done with the month, demonstrates really remarkable leadership."

Clinton also played out a hypothetical of what non-intervention by the United States might have looked like.

"Imagine we were sitting here and Benghazi had been overrun, a city of 700,000 people, and tens of thousands of people had been slaughtered, hundreds of thousands had fled and, as Bob [Gates] said, either with nowhere to go or overwhelming Egypt while it's in its own difficult transition. And we were sitting here, the cries would be, why did the United States not do anything?" she said

"Why -- how could you stand by when, you know, France and the United Kingdom and other Europeans and the Arab League and your Arab partners were saying you've got to do something," Clinton said.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio