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Wednesday
Jun292016

Michael Phelps Qualifies for His Fifth Olympic Team

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Just one day shy of his 31st birthday, Michael Phelps has made history becoming the first male swimmer to qualify for 5 US Olympic Teams.

Phelps earned his ticket to Rio after placing first in the men’s 200M butterfly at the U.S. Olympic swimming trials Wednesday night.

"I think that means the most tonight,'' Phelps said, pausing to compose himself. "Just being able to finish how I want to is so important to me. Getting on this team is what I wanted to do.''

Phelps also holds the all-time records for Olympic gold medals (18), Olympic gold medals in individual events (11), and Olympic medals in individual events for a male (13).

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Wednesday
Jun292016

Report: Talks Between Dwyane Wade, Heat Stall

Phil Ellsworth / ESPN Images(NEW YORK) -- Dwyane Wade and the Miami Heat can't seem to find some common ground.

League sources tell ESPN contract talks between both sides have stalled and the shooting guard is now getting ready to field offers from other teams on Friday, when the NBA free agency period opens.

According to the sources, multiple teams have been alerted that Wade, 34, will be on the market by the week's end.

Last year, Wade and the Heat went back and forth on his contract before settling on a one-year, $20 million deal. The basketball star had hoped for a smoother process this time around.

"I hope that everything is quiet and works out the way I want it to," Wade said at the end of this past season, ESPN reports. "But I have no control over that, as much as people might think. It's a lot of moving parts in free agency. I'm not worried about it."

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Wednesday
Jun292016

Wimbledon Wardrobe Controversy and an Underdog Win in Opening Round

iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — The oldest tennis tournament in the world is known for its strict dress code, but one dress at Wimbledon had some players in search of a wardrobe change.

The NikeCourt Premier Slam Dress was approved by Wimbledon, which requires all players to wear white; however, the sponsored athletes sporting the dress have found it to be too revealing.

The empire-waisted, soft flowing dress spins up when the ladies are playing, showing lots of skin and leaving little to the imagination.

Some upset fans took to Twitter to air their grievances, giving the outfit the nickname "Nike nightie." One even called the outfit a "giant fail."

Players are using unique ways to make the dress work.

Britain's own, Katie Boulter, belted her dress with a white Nike headband in an attempt to hold the fabric in place...

... While Czech Republic player Lucie Hradecka fashioned the dress as a top worn with leggings.

One player standing by the dress is Canadian Eugenie Bouchard. The 2014 Wimbledon singles finalist said "For me, I love it. It's nice and short so you can move around and be free with your movements."

Meanwhile, attracting attention for his play on the court and his remarkable story, is British born left-hander Marcus Willis.

Willis defied his 772 world ranking to upset Ricardas Berankis, the world number 54 player from Lithuania, in the opening round.

The 25-year-old was ready to give up on his tennis dream and, having scrambled into pre-qualifying where he was the last man in the draw after a player dropped out, he won three matches to make it to the main qualifying event where he won three more to qualify for the main draw of a Grand Slam for the first time.

Willis' fairy-tale story plays out this afternoon as he takes on the world number 3, Roger Federer, who is eager to play him.

Federer told reporters, "I think it's a great, great story and I'm very excited to be playing him actually."

Second-round coverage of the match will be on ESPN at 12:30 p.m. ET.

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Wednesday
Jun292016

Scoreboard Roundup — 6/28/16

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Here are the latest scores and winners:

INTERLEAGUE

Detroit 7, Miami 5
Cleveland 5, Atlanta 3
St. Louis 8, Kansas City 4
Toronto 14, Colorado 9
Seattle 5, Pittsburgh 2
Baltimore 11, San Diego 7
Oakland 13, San Francisco 11

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Texas 7, N.-Y. Yankees 1
Boston 8, Tampa Bay 2
Minnesota 4, Chi. White Sox 0
Houston 7, Anaheim 1

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Washington 5, N.-Y. Mets 0
Chi. Cubs 7, Cincinnati 2/15 innings
Los Angeles 6, Milwaukee 5
Philadelphia 4, Arizona 3

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Wednesday
Jun292016

New Sprint Cup Eligibility Procedures Announced

Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images(DAYTONA BEACH, Fla.) — NASCAR has announced new procedures for Sprint Cup Series race eligibility, and new starting guidelines for Chase for the Sprint Cup races.

In the first new procedure, current-year owner point will be used instead of practice speeds for determining race eligibility and starting positions if conditions prevent qualifying from taking place. That procedure will be in effect starting Saturday at the Coke Zero 400 at Daytona, and will remain in effect for the rest of the season.

Beginning next season, after the first race, practice speeds will be used to determine race eligibility for Open teams.

The second new procedure will give Open teams a better chance to compete for the Chase championship.  It will give Open teams that earn a berth in the Chase provisional starting positions for every Chase race.

"These changes provide a more even competition field for both Charter and Open teams, rewarding strong performances over the course of a season," said Jim Cassidy, NASCAR senior vice president, racing operations, in a statement. "Earning a berth in the Chase for the NASCAR Sprint Cup is extremely difficult and requires consistent elite performance. Those teams should be guaranteed an opportunity to race for the title, and this ensures that will be the case."

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Wednesday
Jun292016

Buddy Ryan, Former NFL Coach and Defensive Specialist, Dies at 85

Brett Carlsen/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Former NFL head coach and influential defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan died Tuesday. He was 85, reports ESPN.

Ryan coached in the NFL for 26 seasons, and was renowned for building powerful, frenetic defenses

"He was many things to many people -- outstanding coach, mentor, fierce competitor, father figure, faithful friend and the list goes on," his son, Buffalo Bills coach Rex Ryan, said Tuesday in a statement. "But to me and my brothers Rob and Jim, he was so much more. He was everything you want in a dad -- tough when he had to be, compassionate when you didn't necessarily expect it, and a loving teacher and confidant who cherished his family. He truly was our hero."

James Solano, Buddy Ryan's agent, told ESPN that Ryan died in Kentucky, where he lived on a ranch in Shelbyville, but did not give a cause. Funeral services are scheduled for Friday in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky.

"I wonder who just lost their defensive-coordinating job in heaven," former Chicago Bears defensive tackle Steve McMichael told ESPN on Tuesday.

Ryan got his first major job in the pros in 1968 as the lineback coach for the New York Jets, then in the  American Football League. The team led the AFL in defense and shocked the Colts in the Super Bowl 16-7. He was coordinator for one of the NFL's greatest defenses, the 1985 Chicago Bears. Ryan went on to serve as a head coach for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1986 to 1990, and of the Arizona Cardinals in 1994-1995.

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Tuesday
Jun282016

Pat Summitt, Legendary Women's Basketball Coach, Dead at 64

Joe Faraoni / ESPN Images(KNOXVILLE, Tenn.) — Pat Summitt, the legendary University of Tennessee women's basketball coach, died today in Tennessee, the Pat Summitt Foundation announced this morning. She was 64.

Her son, Tyler Summitt, said in a statement, "She died peacefully this morning at Sherrill Hill Senior Living in Knoxville surrounded by those who loved her most."

Pat is survived by her mother, Hazel Albright Head; son, Ross “Tyler” Summitt (AnDe); sister, Linda; brothers, Tommy (Deloris), Charles (Mitzi) and Kenneth (Debbie).

Tyler's statement continued, "She’ll be remembered as the all-time winningest D-1 basketball coach in NCAA history, but she was more than a coach to so many – she was a hero and a mentor, especially to me, her family, her friends, her Tennessee Lady Volunteer staff and the 161 Lady Vol student-athletes she coached during her 38-year tenure."

The obituary on the Pat Summitt Foundation website, read, "A private service and burial for family and friends will be held in Middle Tennessee. A public service to celebrate her life will take place at Thompson-Boling Arena, on the campus of the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Details for the celebration of life will be shared at a later date."

The obituary read, "On Tuesday, June 28 2016, Pat passed away peacefully, following a courageous battle with early onset dementia, “Alzheimer’s Type." This disease attacked a lifetime of precious memories, memories that she has now won back as she rests in her eternal home. Memories that will live on in each and every relationship she developed throughout her life."

The obituary continued, "This is one simple statement that Patricia Sue Head Summitt embodied, lived by and passed on to so many throughout her 64 years of life. She ‘won’ every day of her life because of the relationships she developed, nurtured and cherished. Relationships with her family and friends. Relationships with players, coaches, and fans. And most importantly, a strong relationship with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ."

Summitt stepped down as Tennessee's coach in 2012, one year after announcing her diagnosis of early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type. Even after stepping down, Summitt remained involved with the Lady Vols, holding the position of head coach emeritus.

Summitt coached the Lady Vols to eight national championships in her 38 seasons and notched 1,098 career victories, more than any other Division I basketball coach. She was named NCAA coach of the year seven times. She also played for the U.S. Olympic team in 1976, the first year there was an Olympic women's basketball tournament, and took home a silver medal.

Summitt was widely know for her stare -- an icy look she would flash to players after a bad play.

In 2012, Summit was the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Arthur Ashe Courage Award at the ESPY Awards.

Summit was born in Clarksville, Tennessee, on June 14, 1952. She grew up on a dairy farm in Henrietta, Tenn., where she planted tobacco and milked cows.

"I look back now and I think that just made me who I am, in terms of my drive and my work ethic," she said in an interview with ABC News' Peter Jennings in 2005.

She and her three older brothers learned to play basketball using a hoop her father put up in the hay barn.

"When you grow up on a dairy farm, cows don't take a day off. So you work every day and my dad always said, 'No one can outwork you,'" Summitt told ABC News' Robin Roberts in a 2011 interview.

When she was named head coach of the University of Tennessee women's team in 1974, Summitt was just 22, barely older than her players. The university had originally offered Summitt an assistant coaching job but promptly promoted her when the team's head coach announced she was taking a sabbatical.

In those early days under Title IX -- the landmark federal law that led schools and colleges to dramatically increase access to sports and other programs for women -- women's basketball games weren't televised and attendance was poor. The Lady Vols were so strapped for cash that Summitt washed her players' uniforms at home and drove the team to games.

"I remember nights I was driving the van and I'm about to go to sleep, and I'd just roll down the window and stick my head out," Summitt told Roberts.

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Tuesday
Jun282016

Tributes Pour in Honoring Legendary Basketball Coach Pat Summitt 

iStock/Thinkstock(KNOXVILLE, Tenn.) -- Tributes are flooding social media to honor the late Pat Summitt, the legendary women's college basketball coach who guided the Tennessee Volunteers to eight national titles in her 38 seasons at the university.

Summitt led the Lady Vols to 1,098 victories, which constitutes the most wins in Division I college basketball history for men and women.

Summitt battled Alzheimer's later in her life, and her advocacy for patients of the disease constitutes a major part of her legacy.

Some of the tributes have come from female sports icons, like tennis star and LGBT advocate Martina Navratilova.

Other tributes have come from men and women in the coaching field, like New Orleans Saints Coach Sean Payton.

Tyler Summitt, Pat's son, issued a statement this morning saying his mother died peacefully at a senior living home in Knoxville, Tennessee, surrounded by those who loved her most. She was 64 years old.

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Tuesday
Jun282016

What Coach Pat Summitt Said in 2011 on Living With Dementia 

Joe Faraoni / ESPN Images(KNOXVILLE, Tenn.) -- Five years before Pat Summitt's death, the legendary University of Tennessee basketball coach was leading her beloved team -- while battling early onset dementia.

"I've been so amazed at the response to dementia and how I'm going to deal with it," Summitt told ABC News' Robin Roberts in 2011.

"These are uncharted waters," Assistant Coach Mickie DeMoss told ABC News at the time. "I don't know how many coaches have made an announcement of dementia that's still coaching."

Summitt -- remembered as the all-time most winning D-1 basketball coach in NCAA history -- told Roberts, "What I want to do is get other people to understand: If you have dementia, don't be afraid of it."

"I work out five days a week -- they say that's very, very important," Summitt said, adding that she would keep her mind sharp with puzzles.

Lady Vols player Vicki Baugh told ABC News at the time that Summitt exemplified a lasting lesson -- "there's no excuses."

"Pat lives by that every day on the court and off the court," Baugh said.

"No matter what is thrown her way, she will overcome it. And I apply that to myself," Baugh said. "There's no excuse to not succeeding and doing the things that I want to do."

"It's all about the players," Summitt told Roberts. "I like to see young people succeed."

"I always think I have something to teach them," she said smiling.

Summitt, who stepped down as University of Tennessee's women's basketball coach in 2012, died peacefully this morning at the age of 64, according to her family.

"Since 2011, my mother has battled her toughest opponent, early onset dementia, ‘Alzheimer’s Type,’ and she did so with bravely fierce determination, just as she did with every opponent she ever faced," her son Tyler said in a statement. "Even though it’s incredibly difficult to come to terms that she is no longer with us, we can all find peace in knowing she no longer carries the heavy burden of this disease."

"For 64 years, my mother first built her life upon a strong relationship with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Her foundation was also built upon love of her family and of her players, and love of the fundamentals of hard work which reflected her philosophy that ‘you win in life with people,'" Tyler said. "She’ll be remembered as the all-time winningest D-1 basketball coach in NCAA history, but she was more than a coach to so many -- she was a hero and a mentor, especially to me, her family, her friends, her Tennessee Lady Volunteer staff and the 161 Lady Vol student-athletes she coached during her 38-year tenure."

Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Tuesday
Jun282016

Caitlyn Jenner Appears on Sports Illustrated Cover 40 Years After Victory

Courtesy Sports Illustrated(NEW YORK) -- Few have made it on both the cover of Vanity Fair in a corset and the cover of Sports Illustrated with an Olympic gold medal. But since announcing her transition last year, Caitlyn Jenner has continued to break barriers. Now, 40 years after her record-breaking Olympic victory in Montreal, the 66-year-old appears on the latest cover of Sports Illustrated covered in gold sequins and with her gold medal to match.

This marks Jenner’s first time wearing the medal around her neck since the victory. "It's a picture that brings attention to this issue," Jenner told SI. "That's the important thing. That's why I wore the medal." Jenner appeared on the cover 40 years ago as Bruce.

But the medal isn’t something Jenner usually flaunts. In fact, it typically remains tucked away in her nail drawer, she said. Her children’s show and tell presentations were about the extent to which it was put on display.

In the feature, which also includes a 22-minute video, Jenner discusses both her Olympic years as well as her more recent decision to transition.

“My life was distraction after distraction after distraction,” she said of her years as one of the world’s most famous athletes. “Being a macho male was a way for me to try to convince myself that the woman living inside of me really isn’t living inside me.”

After years of grappling with herself, Jenner said she finally made the decision to transition in 2014, once she felt it was the right time for herself and for society. “This issue doesn’t deserve to be in the gutter anymore,” she said.

Though the cover seems to bring her two lives together, throughout the interview, Jenner maintains that she finds more value in her role as an advocate than an Olympic athlete.

The story appears in the July 4 to 11 edition of Sports Illustrated and can be found here.

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