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Thursday
Sep132018

Scoreboard roundup -- 9/12/18

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Wednesday’s sports events:

INTERLEAGUE
San Diego 5, Seattle 4

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Houston 5, Detroit 4
Tampa Bay 3, Cleveland 1
Oakland 10, Baltimore 0
Boston 1, Toronto 0
Minnesota 3, N.Y. Yankees 1
Chicago White Sox 4, Kansas City 2, 12 Innings
L.A. Angels 8, Texas 1

NATIONAL LEAGUE
L.A. Dodgers 8, Cincinnati 1
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 3
Atlanta 2, San Francisco 1
N.Y. Mets 13, Miami 0
Washington 5, Philadelphia 1
Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 1
Colorado 5, Arizona 4

WOMEN'S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFS
Seattle 98, Washington 82

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Monday
Sep102018

The controversial tennis umpire at the center of the Serena Williams US Open drama 

Mike Stobe/Getty Images for USTA(NEW YORK) -- It's hard to upstage Serena Williams on the tennis court or to take away the shine from 20-year-old record breaker Naomi Osaka, who became the first Japanese tennis slam winner.

But Carlos Ramos did just that.

The longtime tennis umpire became the subject of widespread scrutiny on Saturday night after a series of calls against Williams during the U.S. Open women's finals.

Ramos is a gold badge-level umpire, who has been the deciding force in a number of high profile matches, but his calls in the finals match prompted outrage both on and off the court.

Ramos gave Williams a penalty because her coach was admittedly coaching from off the court, which is barred in the sport though it is widely understood to be a common practice.

The second penalty came after Williams later smashed her racquet against the ground.

The third incident came shortly after that, when Williams yelled at Ramos over the call, with her calling him a "thief" which then prompted him to classify that as verbal abuse towards the umpire. Because that was her third penalty of the game, the rules of the sports mandate that it prompts a game penalty.

Katrina Adams, United States Tennis Association (USTA) president and CEO, talked about the controversy with ESPN the day after the match.

"I would say last night is unfortunate," Adams said to ESPN. "And we have to have consistency because when you look at what the women, in this case, Serena, is feeling, we watch the guys do this all the time. They're badgering the chair umpires on the changeover. Nothing happens."

As for Ramos, Adams said that "umpires are reviewed throughout the tournaments" and nothing had suggested that he should not be assigned to the women’s final.

"His record was good so there was no reason for us to not be putting him in the chair," Adams said.

"We have to treat each other fairly and the same and I know that what Serena did and her behavior was not welcome and there could have been a line that should have been drawn," Adams said. "But when you look at Carlos or the umpire in this particular situation, it's a 'judgment call' to give that last penalty, because she called him a thief? They've been called a lot worse."

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) released a statement of support for Ramos Monday, standing by Ramos' calls but noting that the situation was a "regrettable incident."

"Carlos Ramos is one of the most experienced and respected umpires in tennis," the ITF said in its statement. "Mr. Ramos’ decisions were in accordance with the relevant rules and were re-affirmed by the U.S. Open’s decision to find Serena Williams for the three offenses."

The statement went on to read: "It is understandable that this high profile and the regrettable incident should provoke debate. At the same time, it is important to remember that Mr. Ramos undertook his duties as an official according to the relevant rule book and acted at all times with professionalism and integrity."

Ramos has umpired an Olympic final match between Andy Murray and Roger Federer and been the one on the court deciding the fate of all four grand slam tennis tournaments, but there has been a share of controversial calls beyond this most recent case.

Wimbledon 2018: Novak Djokovic

Earlier this season, Ramos was the umpire in a match between the Serbian superstar and opponent Kei Nishikori.

Ramos cited Djokovic for two violations during the match, the first of which coming when Djokovic hit his racquet against the ground. Ramos reportedly said that he damaged the famed grass court used in the British tournament, and Djokovic balked.

"I just asked him whether he thought honestly that I damaged the court with the racket that I throw. I mean, anybody who saw the match, I mean, saw that literally I kind of touched the grass," Djokovic said later after the match.

The alleged roughness against the grass wasn't the only issue that arose over that call, as Nishikori allegedly smashed the ground with his racquet during that same match, but Ramos said he didn't see it so Nishikori received no penalty.

French Open 2017: Rafael Nadal

Another male tennis star who has publicly criticized Ramos was Rafael Nadal, this time at Roland-Garros.

Nadal had been issued two warnings for taking too much time during the crossovers in the game when players take a brief break while switching sides of the court.

"I say it with sadness, but he is an umpire who scrutinizes me more and who fixates on me more," Spanish-speaking Nadal told the media after the match.

"He also pressured me about coaching," Nadal said of Ramos, according to Spanish-language sports newspaper Marca.

"I have respect for him and all I ask is for that to be reciprocated," Nadal said, according to Marca.

French Open 2016: Venus Williams


Even though Serena Williams’ squabble with Ramos is the one garnering headlines now, her older sister Venus Williams made a similar complaint against Ramos back in 2016.

Like Serena Williams, Venus Williams was cited by Ramos for a coaching violation during the 2016 French Open.

Venus Williams responded indignantly, saying: "Honestly, I’m 36 years old. Never in my career have I had a coaching violation. No, I don’t do that. Just don't even go there."

Two years, a different continent and a different Williams sister later, Serena Williams voiced a very similar complaint.

"You may have thought that was coaching but I'm telling you it was not," Serena Williams said Saturday. "I don't cheat to win. I'd rather lose."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Sunday
Sep092018

Serena Williams fined $17,000 for outburst at the US Open

Michael Owens/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Serena Williams was fined $17,000 on Sunday for a total of three code violations during her loss to Naomi Osaka in the U.S. Open final — $4,000 for being warned for coaching after her coach made a hand gesture to her, $3,000 for breaking her racket and $10,000 for "verbal abuse" of chair umpire Carlos Ramos, whom she accused of sexism.

The U.S. Tennis Association confirmed to ABC News on Sunday that $17,000 will be deducted from Serena Williams’ $1.85 million check as the runner-up to Naomi Osaka, who became the the first tennis player from Japan to win a Grand Slam singles title on Saturday.

The fine money will be donated to the Grand Slam Development Fund. The purpose of the fund is to "develop competitive tennis opportunities worldwide," according to the International Tennis Federation.

In what began a string of heated moments, Ramos issued the first of three violations to Williams for getting coaching in the second game of the second set, and while she disputed the ruling, her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou later acknowledged he was trying to send her a signal.

Williams later received another warning for smashing her racket, which automatically cost her a point, renewing her argument with Ramos, whom she referred to as "a thief" and "a liar," resulting in a third violation for "verbal abuse" and caused her to forfeit a game.

During a press conference after the match, Williams said that Ramos' ruling was "sexist" because she has witnessed male players calling umpires "several things," but they were not penalized.

"For me to say 'thief' and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark," she said.

"He's never taken a game from a man because they said 'thief,' she added. "For me it blows my mind. But I'm going to continue to fight for women."

The Women's Tennis Association (WTA) released a statement Monday morning saying it was "working with the sport" to address gender inequality.

"The WTA believes that there should be no difference in the standards of tolerance provided to the emotions expressed by men vs. women and is committed to working with the sport to ensure that all players are treated the same. We do not believe that this was done last night," WTA CEO Steve Simon said. "We also think the issue of coaching needs to be addressed and should be allowed across the sport. The WTA supports coaching through its on-court coaching rule, but further review is needed."

Tennis legend Billie Jean King agreed with Williams in a series of tweets, calling out a "double standard."

"Several things went very wrong during the @usopen Women’s Finals today. Coaching on every point should be allowed in tennis. It isn’t, and as a result, a player was penalized for the actions of her coach. This should not happen," King ,the winner of 39 Grand Slam titles, wrote on Saturday.

"When a woman is emotional, she’s "hysterical" and she’s penalized for it. When a man does the same, he’s "outspoken" & and there are no repercussions. Thank you, @serenawilliams, for calling out this double standard. More voices are needed to do the same," she added.

Although Williams' feud with Ramos appeared to overshadow Osaka's historic 6-2 6-4 victory, the two women shared an emotional moment together when Williams hugged Osaka, who considers Williams — the winner of 23 Grand Slam singles titles — her childhood idol.

As a tense audience celebrated and jeered at Osaka's win, both women were wiping away their tears when Williams whispered something to Osaka and then embraced her.

Osaka told ABC News Saturday evening that when Serena Williams hugged her at the end of the controversial match, it "really brought out the emotions” because when I was little and I was watching her play, I always wanted the opportunity to play her."

Osaka reflected on the moment after the match when she returned to her seat and put a towel over her head as the ceremonial stage was being assembled.

She said she did so because the momentous win was finally starting to dawn on her: "I felt like I needed a break from everything."

Meanwhile, Williams told ABC News on Saturday that when she saw Osaka begin to cry at the trophy presentation, her motherly instincts kicked in.

"I felt like, 'Wow this isn’t how I felt when I won my first grand slam,' so I was like, 'I definitely don’t want her to feel like that,'" Williams said. "We’ve got to pull ourselves together here."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

(NEW YORK) --  Serena Williams was fined $17,000 on Sunday for a total of three code violations during her loss to Naomi Osaka in the U.S. Open final — $4,000 for being warned for coaching after her coach made a hand gesture to her, $3,000 for breaking her racket and $10,000 for "verbal abuse" of chair umpire Carlos Ramos, whom she accused of sexism.

The U.S. Tennis Association confirmed to ABC News on Sunday that $17,000 will be deducted from Serena Williams’ $1.85 million check as the runner-up to Naomi Osaka, who became the first tennis player from Japan to win a Grand Slam singles title on Saturday.

The fine money will be donated to the Grand Slam Development Fund. The purpose of the fund is to "develop competitive tennis opportunities worldwide," according to the International Tennis Federation.

In what began a string of heated moments, Ramos issued the first of three violations to Williams for getting coaching in the second game of the second set, and while she disputed the ruling, her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou later acknowledged he was trying to send her a signal.

Williams later received another warning for smashing her racket, which automatically cost her a point, renewing her argument with Ramos, whom she referred to as "a thief" and "a liar," resulting in a third violation for "verbal abuse" and caused her to forfeit a game.

During a press conference after the match, Williams said that Ramos' ruling was "sexist" because she has witnessed male players calling umpires "several things," but they were not penalized.

"For me to say 'thief' and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark," she said.

"He's never taken a game from a man because they said 'thief,' she added. "For me it blows my mind. But I'm going to continue to fight for women."

Tennis legend Billie Jean King agreed with Williams in a series of tweets, calling out a "double standard." https://twitter.com/BillieJeanKing/status/1038613108976168960

"Several things went very wrong during the @usopen Women’s Finals today. Coaching on every point should be allowed in tennis. It isn’t, and as a result, a player was penalized for the actions of her coach. This should not happen," King ,the winner of 39 Grand Slam titles, wrote on Saturday.

"When a woman is emotional, she’s "hysterical" and she’s penalized for it. When a man does the same, he’s "outspoken" & and there are no repercussions. Thank you, @serenawilliams, for calling out this double standard. More voices are needed to do the same," she added. https://twitter.com/BillieJeanKing/status/1038613218296569856

Although Williams' feud with Ramos appeared to overshadow Osaka's historic 6-2 6-4 victory, the two women shared an emotional moment together when Williams hugged Osaka, who considers Williams — the winner of 23 Grand Slam singles titles — her childhood idol.

As a tense audience celebrated and jeered at Osaka's win, both women were wiping away their tears when Williams whispered something to Osaka and then embraced her.

Osaka told ABC News Saturday evening that when Serena Williams hugged her at the end of the controversial match, it "really brought out the emotions” because when I was little and I was watching her play, I always wanted the opportunity to play her."

Osaka reflected on the moment after the match when she returned to her seat and put a towel over her head as the ceremonial stage was being assembled.

She said she did so because the momentous win was finally starting to dawn on her: "I felt like I needed a break from everything."

Meanwhile, Williams told ABC News on Saturday that when she saw Osaka begin to cry at the trophy presentation, her motherly instincts kicked in.

"I felt like, 'Wow this isn’t how I felt when I won my first grand slam,' so I was like, 'I definitely don’t want her to feel like that,'" Williams said. "We’ve got to pull ourselves together here."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Sunday
Sep092018

Naomi Osaka makes history of her own in US Open win over Serena Williams

Chris Trotman/Getty Images/USTA(NEW YORK) -- Naomi Osaka, winner of the U.S. Open Women’s Final, said that when Serena Williams hugged her at the end of the controversial match, it “really brought out the emotions” because “when I was little and I was watching her play, I always wanted the opportunity to play her.”

The 20-year-old told ABC News Saturday evening that her historic win had not yet sunken in. Osaka’s straight-set victory, 6-2, 6-4, on Saturday made her the first Japanese player to win a grand slam singles title ever. In doing so, she at least delayed Williams from tying Margaret Court for the most grand slam titles in women's tennis history.

Speaking right off of Arthur Ashe Stadium court, Osaka reflected on the moment after the match when she returned to her seat and put a towel over her head as the ceremonial stage was being assembled.

She said she did so because the momentous win was finally starting to dawn on her: “I felt like I needed a break from everything.”

Saturday’s match was marred in controversy after coaching violations were called against Williams’ coach Patrick Mouratoglou. But Osaka had dominated in the first set, breaking Williams' serve twice and cruising to a 6-2 win in barely over a half-hour.

As the trophy presentation started, Osaka began to cry.

Responding to a question from ABC News, Williams said at that moment her motherly instincts kicked in.

“I felt like, 'Wow, this isn’t how I felt when I won my first grand slam,' so I was like, 'I definitely don’t want her to feel like that,'” Williams said. “We’ve got to pull ourselves together here.”

When they approached the net, following the match, Williams hugged Osaka and said she was proud of her, the champion said.

The Women’s Tennis Association said in a statement following the match, “There are matters that need to be looked into that took place during the match. For tonight, it is time to celebrate these two amazing players, both of whom have great integrity.”

Walking into Saturday, Osaka said she didn’t know how the match would end, but that “always in my dreams, I end up winning.”

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Sunday
Sep092018

Scoreboard roundup -- 9/8/18

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Saturday’s sports events:

INTERLEAGUE
Detroit 4, St. Louis 3

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Houston 5, Boston 3
Oakland 8, Texas 6
Cleveland 9, Toronto 8
Tampa Bay 10, Baltimore 5
Kansas City 4, Minnesota 1
L.A. Angels 12, Chicago White Sox 3
N.Y. Yankees 4, Seattle 2

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pittsburgh 5, Miami 1
Washington 10, Chicago Cubs 3
Cincinnati 7, San Diego 2, 7 Innings
N.Y. Mets 10, Philadelphia 5
Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3
Atlanta 5, Arizona 4, 10 Innings
Colorado 4, L.A. Dodgers 2
Washington 6, Chicago Cubs 5

TOP 25 COLLEGE FOOTBALL
(1) Alabama 57, Arkansas St. 7
(2) Clemson 28, Texas A&M 26
(3) Georgia 41, (24) South Carolina 17
(4) Ohio St. 52, Rutgers 3
(5) Wisconsin 45, New Mexico 14
(6) Oklahoma 49, UCLA 21
(7) Auburn 63, Alabama St. 9
(8) Notre Dame 24, Ball St. 16
(9) Washington 45, North Dakota 3
(10) Stanford 17, (17) Southern Cal 3
(11) LSU 31, Southeastern Louisiana 0
(12) Virginia Tech 62, William & Mary 17
(13) Penn St. 51, Pittsburgh 6
(14) West Virginia 52, Youngstown St. 17
Arizona St. 16, (15) Michigan St. 13
(18) Mississippi St. 31, Kansas St. 10
(19) UCF 38, SC State 0
(20) Boise St. 62, UConn 7
(21) Michigan 49, W. Michigan 3
(22) Miami 77, Savannah St. 0
(23) Oregon 62, Portland St. 14
Kentucky 27, (25) Florida 16

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Saturday
Sep082018

Serena Williams loses temper, US Open final in stunning upset 

Elsa/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Serena Williams lost a chance to make history at the U.S. Open Saturday -- but the tennis great also lost her temper in spectacular fashion on her way to losing the final in straight sets.

Williams, who was vying for her 24th Grand Slam singles title, lost to Naomi Osaka, 6-2, 6-4.

But the match was overshadowed by Williams' eruption -- which was sparked when the chair umpire called a coaching violation against her and reached its peak when she slammed her racket on the court.

"I don't cheat to win," she screamed at the umpire. "I would rather lose."

Williams' meltdown continued when the umpire gave her another warning.

"I have a daughter and I stand for what is right," she said. "I have never cheated.”

As the crowd at the Arthur Ashe Stadium, the umpire issued a game penalty in the second set, making the score 3-5, putting Osaka that much closer to winning the tournament.

Williams appealed to U.S. Open referee, who sided with the umpire. She returned to serve and won the next game, making the match 4-5.

But Osaka closed out the tennis legend and new mom in the next game.

Osaka made history by becoming the first Japanese player to ever win a Grand Slam title.

But the victory was marred by controversy.

After the match, Williams hugged Osaka, but the newly crowned U.S. Open champion sat down and cried quietly.

During the trophy presentation, the crowd continued to boo, causing Osaka to cry again on the stage.

Williams didn't address the controversy, but defended her opponent.

"Well I don’t want to be rude but I don’t want to do questions. She played well," Williams said, referring to Osaka. "This is her first grand slam. I know you guys were rooting ... let’s not boo anymore ... congratulations Naomi ... I hope to play here again.”

Osaka acknowledged that she was not the fan favorite and that "everyone was cheering for" Williams.

"I'm sorry it had to end like this," she said. "I just want to say thank you for watching the match ... it was always my dream to play Serena at the US Open finals ... I am grateful. Thank you."

Williams got emotional during the press conference afterward and comforted Osaka because "she's crying and she just won."

"I felt like, 'Wow, this isn't how I felt when I won my first Grand Slam, so I was like, I definitely don't want her to feel like that," Williams said. "Yeah, maybe it was the mom in me that was like, 'We've to pull ourselves together here."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Saturday
Sep082018

Former NFL star Tiki Barber talks Giants, national anthem, and Super Bowl

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Will Saquon Barkley live up to his draft status? Is quarterback Eli Manning in decline? How will the Giants fare after a forgettable 2017 season?

These are a handful of questions New York Giants fans are asking as the team prepares for its 2018 season opener against the Jacksonville Jaguars Sunday afternoon in New Jersey.

Tiki Barber, the franchise's all-time leading rusher, provided some answers, previewing the season and offering an extensive take on national anthem demonstrations in a conversation with ABC News.

Barber will be in Hoboken, New Jersey for the game as a part of DraftKings' and Thuzio's Kickoff Bash event in Hoboken. He will be joined by former Giants running back Brandon Jacobs and former New York Jets' center Nick Mangold.

"The pieces are there. The skill position players are there. They have the requisite to be successful," says Barber, discussing the Giants' preseason roster. He points star receiver Odell Beckham's return from injury and the addition of Saquon Barkley as key factors in an offense that hopes to rebound after a 3-13 season. However, Barber says the Giants offense will only be successful if they can consistently perform. That, he believes, will happen more as the year goes on.

The biggest beneficiary of Beckham and Barkley's presence: quarterback Eli Manning. Barber believes Barkley and Beckham will take pressure off Manning, who has been charged with leading an offense in recent seasons that has ranked near the bottom of the NFL in rushing. With an improved run game, Barber believes Manning’s statistics will also improve.

The discussion with Barber turned from a Giants preview to addressing one of the most impassioned issues the NFL faces: players kneeling during the national anthem.

Barber would never kneel for the national anthem because "of what it [the American flag] meant to me in 2001. And the overwhelming sense of unity that it brought." He references the Giants' first game following the terror attacks on September 11, 2001, an away matchup with the Kansas City Chiefs. The playing of the national anthem during that game "moved me in a way I would never imagine,” and he could not imagine kneeling after that experience.

However, the former NFL star respects athletes' decision to kneel, and takes issue with some people's attitudes discussing the matter. "What I can't stand, and I think it is insulting to the complex history of our country, is to say it's black or white and you're wrong or you're right," says Barber. He hopes to turn the conversation from binary to nuance. Instead of labeling kneeling right or wrong, he wants players to try to accept peoples' reactions and observers to respect and understand those who choose to kneel.

Although Barber expects improvement from his former team, he does not expect the Giants to represent the NFC in the Super Bowl. "I like the Rams out of the NFC," he says, suggesting fans may see a repeat of the 2001 Super Bowl between the Rams and New England Patriots.

With high-profile offseason additions such as Ndamukong Suh and Aqib Talib, as well as extending Aaron Donald's contract, Barber believes the Rams may be the top Super Bowl contender. Conceding the Patriots' roster is not as strong entering this season as it has been in recent years, he warns, "The Patriots always readjust... somehow they always make these guys into stars."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Saturday
Sep082018

Scoreboard roundup -- 9/7/18

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Friday’s sports events:

INTERLEAGUE
Detroit 5, St. Louis 3

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Toronto 3, Cleveland 2, 11 Innings
Tampa Bay 14, Baltimore 2
Houston 6, Boston 3
Minnesota 10, Kansas City 6
L.A. Angels 5, Chicago White Sox 2
Oakland 8, Texas 4
N.Y. Yankees 4, Seattle 0

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Cincinnati 12, San Diego 6
Pittsburgh 5, Miami 3
Philadelphia 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 2
L.A. Dodgers 4, Colorado 2
Arizona 5, Atlanta 3

WOMEN'S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION PLAYOFFS
Seattle 89, Washington 76

TOP 25 COLLEGE FOOTBALL
(16) TCU 42, SMU 12

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Sep062018

'Country over company': College of the Ozarks will strip athletes of Nike branding

Yu Chun Christopher Wong/S3studio/Getty Images(POINT LOOKOUT, Mo.) -- The College of the Ozarks, a private Christian school in Point Lookout, Missouri, has announced plans to strip all student-athletes of Nike branding in response to the sportswear company’s controversial 30th anniversary “Just Do It” ad campaign, which features former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

“In their new ad campaign, we believe Nike executives are promoting an attitude of division and disrespect toward America,” College of the Ozarks President Jerry C. Davis said in a statement on Wednesday, according to ABC News affiliate KMBC.

The college said it will “choose its country over company,” and remove all athletic uniforms that were bought from Nike as well as any clothing containing its emblems.

“If Nike is ashamed of America, we are ashamed of them,” the statement continued. “We also believe that those who know what sacrifice is all about are more likely to be wearing a military uniform than an athletic uniform.”

Kaepernick was the first athlete to kneel during the “Star Spangled Banner,” which is played before NFL games, in protest of police brutality against black people and people of color. He hasn’t played in an NFL game since 2016. Several other professional athletes in the NFL and elsewhere have knelt during the national anthem in solidarity since then, sparking intense political debate across the country.

The College of the Ozarks has made its stance on the issue clear since at least October 2017, when it revised its contracts for competitions in all sports, adding a stipulation that all players and coaches show respect for the American flag and national anthem, according to the publication Ozarks Sports Zone.

The Nike ad is scheduled to air during Thursday’s regular season NFL kickoff game between the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. Kaepernick tweeted a preview for the ad on Monday, featuring his face overlaid by a slogan: “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.” On Wednesday, he tweeted the full commercial.

Kaepernick’s initial tweet prompted many people on the internet to threaten to boycott Nike, as well as throw away or burn any Nike apparel they owned. Similar to College of the Ozarks, one man claimed that Nike was forcing him to choose between his “favorite shoes” and his country.

Others predicted that Nike’s strategy would backfire.

“Nike’s campaign will generate both attention and discussion, which is, arguably, one of its central aims,” Neil Saunders, managing director of data and analytics firm Global Data, previously told ABC News. “However, it is also a risky strategy in that it addresses, and appears to take sides on, a highly politicized issue. This means it could ultimately alienate and lose customers, which is not the purpose of a marketing campaign.”

The company, however, has already benefited from the uproar that the Kaepernick ad has created. In less than 24 hours after first releasing the ad on Twitter, the company received over $43 million worth of media exposure, Bloomberg reported.

NFL executive vice president of communications and public affairs Jocelyn Moore said in a statement on Tuesday, "The National Football League believes in dialogue, understanding and unity. We embrace the role and responsibility of everyone involved with this game to promote meaningful, positive change in our communities. The social justice issues that Colin and other professional athletes have raised deserve our attention and action."

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Thursday
Sep062018

Scoreboard roundup -- 9/5/18

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Here are the scores from Wednesday’s sports events:

INTERLEAGUE
Boston 9, Atlanta 8
 
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Cleveland 3, Kansas City 1
Toronto 10, Tampa Bay 3
L.A. Angels 9, Texas 3
Houston 9, Minnesota 1
Detroit 10, Chicago White Sox 2
Oakland 8, N.Y. Yankees 2
Seattle 5, Baltimore 2

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 2
St. Louis 7, Washington 6
Miami 2, Philadelphia 1
N.Y. Mets 7, L.A. Dodgers 3
Chicago Cubs 6, Milwaukee 4
Colorado 5, San Francisco 3

Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.







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