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Monday
Jun192017

Police: 79 presumed dead in London high-rise fire

TOLGA AKMEN/AFP/Getty Images(LONDON) -- At least 79 people are missing and presumed dead from the massive fire that engulfed a residential high-rise building in London earlier this week, police said on Saturday.

Police warned the number of fatalities may still rise.

Metropolitan Police Service Commander Stuart Cundy said on Saturday that authorities have formally identified one of the victims who died in the June 14 blaze as 23-year-old Mohammad Alhajali, a resident of the apartment building in the West London neighborhood of North Kensington.

"Mohammad was a very amazing and kind person. He gave love to everyone. He came to the U.K. because he had ambitions and aims for his life and for his family. Our whole family will miss Mohammad dearly and he will never be forgotten. To God we belong and to him we return," Alhajali's family said in a statement released by police.

Cundy said rescuers don't expect to find any survivors inside the building.

Investigators believe the fire started at around 1 a.m. local time Wednesday on the fourth floor of the 24-story Grenfell Tower. The London Fire Brigade dispatched more than 200 firefighters, at least 40 fire engines and about 20 ambulance crews in an effort to battle the inferno.

It took nearly two hours to gain control of the conflagration, according to fire officials.

"This is an unprecedented incident," London Fire Commissioner Dany Cotton told reporters Wednesday night. "In my 29 years of being a firefighter, I have never, ever seen anything of this scale."

The Metropolitan Police Service, which is leading the ongoing investigation, believes it has identified the origin of the fire, which so far does not appear to have been intentional. The exact cause of the fire is still unknown.

In addition to those killed, the blaze injured at least 74 people. As of Saturday afternoon, 19 remain hospitalized, with 10 in critical condition, according to police.

It's unclear exactly how many residents were inside the building at the time. But the tower, built in 1974, contained 120 apartments, according to its management company, the Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organization.

Cundy has said that the ongoing operation to recover and identify all victims is a complex process, and some may never be identified.

"The conditions inside Grenfell Tower mean that the search-and-recovery operation to find and recover the victims is extremely challenging. The upper floors of the block are particularly hazardous due to the damage caused by the fire. The sad reality is that this work will take some time, stretching into many, many weeks," the police commander said at a news conference Friday afternoon.

"Sadly, the nature of injuries caused by such an intense fire will mean the identification process will take some time. But it would also be deeply distressing for families for us to release wrong information," he added.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Monday
Jun192017

Jared Kushner to travel to Middle East for peace negotiations this week

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, will travel to the Middle East this week in pursuit of Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations.

He will meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah, ABC News has confirmed.

The Wall Street Journal first reported news of the trip on Sunday.

President Trump has placed Kushner at the center of his efforts to secure a Middle East peace deal.

At an event for donors and Republican supporters the night before the inauguration, Trump addressed Kushner in his remarks and said, "If you can't produce peace in the Middle East, nobody can."

Netanyahu also highlighted his longstanding ties to Kushner in a show of support for Trump when he visited the White House in February.

"Can I reveal, Jared, how long we’ve known you?" Netanyahu said while addressing Kushner, who was seated in the front row of the crowd.

"Well, he was never small. He was always big. He was always tall," Netanyahu said, alluding to Kushner's height, even as a young child.

"But I’ve known the president and I’ve known his family and his team for a long time, and there is no greater supporter of the Jewish people and the Jewish state than President Donald Trump," he concluded.

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Monday
Jun192017

Witnesses describe horror at scene of London mosque attack

Tayfun Salci/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Witnesses at the scene of a suspected deadly terrorist attack outside a London mosque described the horror they experienced as a van plowed into a group gathered outside after evening prayers, killing at least one and injuring 10.

Many of the people who were injured in Monday’s attack near the Finsbury Park Mosque in London had just finished praying at the worship center when a white van suddenly mounted the sidewalk and ran deliberately into them, according to people who witnessed the crash.

"I just saw everyone flying," one witness, who asked to be identified as Khalid, told ABC News on Monday. "And then the guy got out of the van saying ‘where is all Muslims. I want to kill all Muslims.’"

Khalid said three of his friends were injured in the attack, including one who was hit and pinned under the van. Khalid said he went into shock after the collision happened and others on the scene had to lift the van in order to remove him.

"It was horrendous," Khalid said. "This is a terrorist attack and it was not an accident."

The incident is being investigated as a terrorist attack, according to police, and multiple witnesses said the van took a sharp left turn and appeared to hit the crowd intentionally.

A 48-year-old man was arrested at the scene, according to the Met Police, but witnesses reported seeing three attackers, including two who fled the scene.

"There was three of them. Two of them ran away,” delivery driver Mohammed Abdullah told Sky News on Monday. "The other was held at the scene until the police came. Some people wanted to beat him up.”

Khalid described the driver of the van as a white man who had yelled that he wanted to "kill all Muslims."

Another eyewitness, Mohamad, said he and others in the community are worried about returning to the area for prayer on Tuesday.

"Tomorrow, we're going to be here praying," Mohamad said. "We still have to look over our shoulders where we're going to go. Or we might have to even not come."

The incident occurred in North London outside of the Muslim Welfare House, which is located near the Finsbury Park Mosque.

Leaders at the facility -- which provides support services for Muslims in the North London area -- quickly condemned the attack, referring to it as an "act of hate" meant to drive the community apart.

"We have worked very hard over decades to build a peaceful and tolerant community here in Finsbury Park and we totally condemn any act of hate that tries to drive our wonderful community apart," the Muslim Welfare House said in a statement early Monday. "We would appeal for calm at this time."

The Muslim Council of Britain called the incident a "violent manifestation" of Islamophobia and said authorities should increase security outside of mosques "as a matter of urgency."

"Over the past weeks and months, Muslims have endured many incidents of Islamophobia, and this is the most violent manifestation to date," said Harun Khan, secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain. "It appears from eye witness accounts that the perpetrator was motivated by Islamophobia."

He noted that the attack happened during Ramadan -- a holy month on the Islamic calendar that is marked by prayer and fasting -- and said the council "expects the authorities to increase security outside of mosques as a matter of urgency."

Mohammed Kozbar, chairman of the Finsbury Park Mosque, called the incident a "cowardly attack" on worshippers.

London has seen several deadly terrorist attacks in recent months.

Monday's attack came less than a month after a van crashed into a crowd of pedestrians on London Bridge followed by knifing attacks that left eight people dead and many others injured. That attack came in the wake of a suicide bombing outside an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester last month that killed 22.

A separate vehicle ramming attack in March on Westminster Bridge left four dead including the suspect.

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Sunday
Jun182017

Sailors found dead inside Navy destroyer that collided with container ship identified

Navy Media Content Services

(WASHINGTON) -- The seven sailors who were killed in a collision between a U.S. Navy ship and a merchant ship have been identified.

The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Fitzgerald collided with a Philippine container ship off the coast of Japan in the early hours of Saturday morning local time, according to the Navy's 7th Fleet. The Fitzgerald was operating about 56 nautical miles southwest of Yokosuka, Japan, when it hit the container ship at approximately 2:20 a.m. local time, according to Vice Adm. Joseph P. Aucoin of the 7th fleet.

Initially, five sailors were reported injured and seven sailors were reported missing, though the remains of those sailors have since been found.

"As search and rescue crews gained access to the spaces that were damaged during the collision this morning, the missing sailors were located in the flooded berthing compartments," the 7th Fleet said in a statement Saturday evening.

The sailors were identified as: Gunner’s Mate Seaman Dakota Kyle Rigsby, 19, from Palmyra, Virginia; Yeoman 3rd Class Shingo Alexander Douglass, 25, from San Diego; Sonar Technician 3rd Class Ngoc T Truong Huynh, 25, from Oakville, Connecticut; Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Noe Hernandez, 26, from Weslaco, Texas; Fire Controlman 2nd Class Carlos Victor Ganzon Sibayan, 23, from Chula Vista, California; Personnel Specialist 1st Class Xavier Alec Martin, 24, from Halethorpe, Maryland; and Fire Controlman 1st Class Gary Leo Rehm Jr., 37, from Elyria, Ohio.

Cmdr. Ronald Flanders of the U.S. Naval Forces Japan said the focus right now is on the families.

"An investigation will no doubt be conducted in weeks and months ahead..." he said. "We’ve got people weeping on the pier right now."

Aucoin said at a press conference Sunday that the Navy has ceased its search and rescue operation. While a U.S. official tells ABC News that seven bodies were found, Aucoin declined to confirm the number of fatalities, except to say that there were "a number" of missing personnel. He said he was doing so out of respect for the families.

Earlier, the 7th Fleet said the U.S. ship sustained damage on its starboard side and experienced flooding in some spaces.

At the press conference, Aucoin described the damage as "extensive," adding that there was a big puncture and gash below the waterline on one side of the ship. He also said three compartments were severely damaged.

"The ship is salvageable ... [it] will require some significant repair," Aucoin said. "You will see the USS Fitzgerald back ... It will take months, hopefully under a year.

"The water flow is tremendous, and so there wasn’t a lot of time in those spaces that were open to the sea...," he added. "They had to fight the ship to keep it above the surface. It was traumatic.”

Four sailors and the ship's commanding officer were medically evacuated by a Japanese coast guard helicopter, according to Cmdr. Richard Gourley of the U.S. Naval Forces Japan. The 7th Fleet has since confirmed the sailors are in stable condition and are being treated for lacerations and bruises at the Naval Hospital Yokosuka.

"U.S. and Japanese support from the Navy, Maritime Self-Defense Force and Coast Guard are in the area to ensure that the sailors on USS Fitzgerald have the resources they need to stabilize their ship," said Adm. John Richardson, Chief of Naval Operations, in an earlier statement.

"As more information is learned, we will be sure to share it with the Fitzgerald families and when appropriate the public," he added. "Thank you for your well wishes and messages of concern. All of our thoughts and prayers are with the Fitzgerald crew and their families."

"Right now we are focused on two things: the safety of the ship and the well-being of the sailors," said Adm. Scott Swift, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. "We thank our Japanese partners for their assistance."

An information center with available counselors has been set up at the U.S. naval base in Yokosuka.

Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK), the company that chartered the ACX Crystal, released three statements over the weekend regarding the container ship's collision with the USS Fitzgerald. The company said there were no injuries on board the ACX Crystal, and no oil spilled from the ship. It also confirmed that the ship had arrived in Tokyo Bay.

"Our thoughts and deep concerns go out to all those directly affected," the company said. "NYK has established a crisis management headquarters, and fully cooperated with an investigation by the Japan Coast Guard together with the shipowner."

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Sunday
Jun182017

U.S. shoots down Syrian fighter jet over Syria

Hemera/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A U.S. Navy fighter jet shot down a Syrian regime fighter jet on Sunday that had dropped bombs on Syrian rebel forces fighting ISIS in Syria.

The U.S.-led coalition said in a statement that it's focus is on fighting ISIS, and not fighting the Syrian regime or Russian forces, but it will not hesitate to defend coalition or partner forces coming under attack.

The incident occurred in the town of Ja'Din, south of Tabqa, Syria, which had recently been retaken from ISIS by the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), an umbrella group of Syrian Kurdish and Arab rebel forces supported by the U.S. in the fight against the militant group.

SDF came under attack from regime forces in favor of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad around 4:30 p.m. Syria time. A number of SDF fighters were wounded in the assault, and the SDF soon left Ja'Din.

Coalition aircraft conducted a show of force overhead that stopped the initial pro-regime advance towards the town.

"Following the Pro-Syrian forces attack, the coalition contacted its Russian counterparts by telephone via an established 'de-confliction line' to de-escalate the situation and stop the firing," said a statement from Operation Inherent Resolve, the U.S.-led coalition fighting ISIS.

"At 6:43 p.m., a Syrian regime SU-22 dropped bombs near SDF fighters south of Tabqah and, in accordance with rules of engagement and in collective self-defense of coalition partnered forces, was immediately shot down by a U.S. F/A-18E Super Hornet," said the statement.

Ja'Din is approximately two kilometers north of an established East-West SDF-Syrian Regime de-confliction area.

In the statement, the coalition stressed its goals and that it will defend its partnered forces.

"The coalition does not seek to fight Syrian regime, Russian, or pro-regime forces partnered with them, but will not hesitate to defend coalition or partner forces from any threat," it said.

"The demonstrated hostile intent and actions of pro-regime forces toward coalition and partner forces in Syria conducting legitimate counter-ISIS operations will not be tolerated," it added.

The shootdown is the latest escalation between the U.S.-led coalition and pro-regime Assad forces in Syria.

Over the last four weeks, the U.S. has conducted three airstrikes at pro-regime Assad forces, backed by Iran, that have moved into a deconfliction zone around the town of at Tanf in southwest Syria, which is the location of a coalition training base for local forces fighting ISIS.

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Sunday
Jun182017

Refugee who died in Grenfell Tower blaze braved 'terrible journey' to reach London

Courtesy Metropolitan Police Service(LONDON) -- Mohammad Al-Hajali, the Syrian refugee who died in Grenfell Tower in Wednesday’s massive West London blaze, made a perilous journey three years ago to escape the Syrian civil war and reach the U.K, according to a friend of his family.

Al-Hajali, 23, was the first victim of the horrific blaze to be formally identified by authorities. Now, the U.K Home Office has agreed to assist his family back in Syria in making arrangements to travel to London to attend his funeral, after tens of thousands of people petitioned the government to help them.

The official death toll from the fire that destroyed a residential high-rise building in London this week has climbed to at least 30, while scores of people were left injured. At least 58 people are missing and presumed dead from the massive fire, police said Saturday.

Al-Hajali was one of three brothers to make the journey to the U.K. from Syria, according to Abdulaziz Al-Mashi of the Syria Solidarity Campaign, the NGO that helped launch the petition.

Al-Mashi told ABC News that the brothers were lucky to have made it to the U.K. alive.

"They thought they were safe now that they had made it, but it turns out they were wrong," Al-Mashi said by phone from his home in London.

Al-Mashi said the trip from Syria to the U.K. was treacherous because of the many risks involved.

"Absolutely, this was a terrible journey for them," he said. "These brothers risked their lives to make the trip."

Among the survivors of the blaze was Omar Al-Hajali, Mohammed's younger brother, who was separated from Mohammed inside Grenfell Tower while they tried to escape.

Mohammed and Omar fled from Daraa, Syria together in 2014. First they smuggled themselves into Turkey, and then managed to make a boat ride across to Greece, before ending up in the U.K. that year, Al-Mashi said.

Hashem Al-Hajali, another younger brother, made a similar trip to the U.K., following them, according to Al-Mashi. He was situated 40 minutes from Grenfell Tower when he learned news of the fire, and rushed there in a taxi to be with his brothers.

"I saw the flames eating the building, and then I saw Omar on the floor at the entrance," Hashem told ABC News.

"He was crying. He was hardly breathing. He couldn’t lift his body, his hands. His friend was helping him speak on the phone to Hammuda," Hashem said, using his brother Mohammed’s nickname.

"[He] was shouting 'Hammuda, come downstairs.' He was giving him orders: ‘Hammuda come downstairs, come downstairs,'" he said.

The brothers have a mother, father, and two sisters living in Damascus right now, according to Al-Mashi, who said that they have attempted to host a family reunion for the last two years with no success.

"Mohammad was a very amazing and kind person. He gave love to everyone," his family said in a statement on Saturday. "He came to the U.K. because he had ambitions and aims for his life and for his family. Our whole family will miss Mohammad dearly, and he will never be forgotten. To God we belong and to him we return."

The number of registered refugees leaving Syria has scaled higher in recent years, exceeding 5 million since 2012, according to the United Nations.

Thousands of refugees die attempting to reach safe haven every year, according to the U.N.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Sunday
Jun182017

Police: U.S. citizen living in Afghanistan kidnapped on way to work

iStock/Thinkstock(KABUL, Afghanistan) -- An American citizen who is living in Afghanistan was kidnapped on his way to work on Sunday, Kabul police said.

The kidnapping took place in the Karte Char area of Kabul, according to Mohammad Almas, the head of the Kabul police's Crime Investigation Department.

Almas said the kidnappers posed in Afghan security forces uniforms in order to trick the victim into stopping his vehicle.

Police originally said the man, whose name has not been released, was working on a World Bank project with the Afghan Ministry of Agriculture. But later on Sunday, World Bank spokesman Alex Ferguson denied the claim.

"No World Bank staff have been kidnapped," Ferguson told ABC News in an email. "Our understanding is that these reports refer to an employee of the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock who is working for the National Horticulture and Livestock Project, which is funded by a World Bank-managed trust fund."

The kidnapping follows a similar incident that took place in August 2016, when two foreign national professors working at the American University of Afghanistan were kidnapped at gunpoint in Kabul.

The professors, Timothy Weeks, an Australian, and Kevin King, an American, were last seen in a video released by the Taliban in January of this year, according to a report in The New York Times.

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Sunday
Jun182017

The aftermath of the deadly wildfire in Portugal that killed 61

Patricia De Melo Moreira/Getty Images(PEDROGAO GRANDE, Portugal) -- Images are coming out of Portugal of the aftermath of a fire that scorched a forested area in the center of the country over the weekend, leaving at least 61 dead, according to a spokesperson at Portugal's interior ministry.

Of the victims, 59 people were killed from flames or smoke inhalation and two more were killed in a road accident trying to flee the blaze, according the spokesperson Aicha El Hammar.

The number of dead, which includes at least four children, is expected to rise, El Hammar said.

Portugal's prime minister, Antonio Costa, said there had been 156 fires across the country over the weekend, with 11 still active, including two blazes that are "particularly problematic."

One of multiple fires that spread in Portugal sent flames sweeping across a road, which reached motorists who became trapped in their cars. That blaze led to the bulk of the damage and fatalities, Costa told reporters on Sunday. Costa said everyone who died was on a road or next to it.

Forty-seven bodies were discovered in or adjacent to their cars, El Hammar told ABC News.

"This tragic situation took place in only one of the fires, particularly at a road next to it," Costa told reporters. "I don't want to talk yet about the cause of the fire because we are facing the greatest tragedy of human lives. So what we must do now is to calmly provide all the resources to fight the fires."

Costa also took to Twitter to thank rescue workers for their efforts to control the blaze, and send condolences to the victims who died.

The Iberian peninsula is currently sweltering under a severe heat wave, with temperatures exceeding 104 degrees in some regions.

On Sunday, Pope Francis led thousands of people in silent prayer for the victims of what he called the “devastating fire,” while the Portuguese football team offered its “deepest sympathies to the families, friends and loved ones of the victims of the fires."

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Saturday
Jun172017

Explosion at Colombia shopping mall leaves 3 dead, 9 injured 

iStock/Thinkstock(BOGOTA) -- An explosion at a Colombia shopping mall left three people dead and nine injured on Saturday, ABC News has confirmed.

Enrique Penalosa, the mayor of Bogota, Colombia, called the incident, which took place in the women's bathroom on the second floor of Centro Andino, a “cowardly terrorist attack.” Police said the explosion was caused by a device placed behind a toilet bowl.

One of the deceased has been identified as Julie Huynh, a 23-year-old French national who had spent the past six months volunteering in the public school sector. The other two died were also women, ages 27 and 31.

Of the injured, one is in grave condition but is expected to survive, while the other eight are in less serious condition.

It's unclear who's responsible. An anti-terror investigation is being conducted by the Colombian prosecutor’s office.

The U.S. Embassy in Bogota offered condolences in a series of tweets, adding that it's standing by to "provide any support requested by the Colombian authorities."

Centro Andino is home to a number of high-end stores including Dolce & Gabbana, Versace and Louis Vuitton.

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Saturday
Jun172017

Police say 58 missing, presumed dead in London high-rise fire

Niklas Halle'n/Getty Images(LONDON) -- At least 58 people are missing and presumed dead from the massive fire that engulfed a residential high-rise building in London earlier this week, police said on Saturday.

This latest figure includes the 30 people already confirmed dead; 16 of those bodies are being held in a mortuary, including one person who died after being transported to a local hospital. The others have been recovered from the scorched structure, according to Metropolitan Police Service Commander Stuart Cundy.

"The figure of 58 are those who are missing and that we have to presume are dead," Cundy said at a news conference in London Saturday afternoon. "It might be that some of those are safe and well, but for whatever reason have not reached [out] to let us know. Again, I would urge them if that is you, I don't care the reason, please, please contact us."

Cundy said the Metropolitan Police Service has formally identified one of the victims who died in the June 14 blaze as 23-year-old Mohammad Alhajali, a resident of the apartment building in the West London neighborhood of North Kensington. Alhajali and his brothers fled their home in Daraa, Syria, due to the ongoing civil war and moved to London in 2014.

"Mohammad was a very amazing and kind person. He gave love to everyone. He came to the U.K. because he had ambitions and aims for his life and for his family. Our whole family will miss Mohammad dearly, and he will never be forgotten. To God we belong, and to him we return," Alhajali's family said in a statement released by police.

Although the flames have now been extinguished, Cundy said rescuers don't expect to find any survivors inside the building at this point.

Investigators believe the fire started at around 1 a.m. local time Wednesday on the fourth floor of the 24-story Grenfell Tower. The London Fire Brigade dispatched more than 200 firefighters, at least 40 fire engines and about 20 ambulance crews in an effort to battle the inferno.

It took nearly two hours to gain control of the conflagration, according to fire officials.

"This is an unprecedented incident," London Fire Commissioner Dany Cotton told reporters Wednesday night. "In my 29 years of being a firefighter, I have never, ever seen anything of this scale."

The Metropolitan Police Service, which is leading the ongoing investigation, believes it has identified the origin of the fire, which so far does not appear to have been intentional. The exact cause of the fire is still unknown.

In addition to those killed, the blaze injured at least 74 people. As of Saturday afternoon, 19 remain hospitalized, with 10 in critical condition, according to police.

It's unclear exactly how many residents were inside the building at the time. But the tower, built in 1974, contained 120 apartments, according to its management company, the Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organization.

Cundy has said the ongoing operation to recover and identify all victims is a complex process, and some may never be identified.

"The conditions inside Grenfell Tower mean that the search-and-recovery operation to find and recover the victims is extremely challenging. The upper floors of the block are particularly hazardous due to the damage caused by the fire. The sad reality is that this work will take some time, stretching into many, many weeks," the police commander said at a news conference Friday afternoon.

"Sadly, the nature of injuries caused by such an intense fire will mean the identification process will take some time. But it would also be deeply distressing for families for us to release wrong information," he added.

The fire has left the building almost completely charred, and there were concerns about the tower's structural integrity, as it appeared to lean slightly to one side.

Search-and-recovery efforts were paused on Friday over safety concerns, but resumed Saturday afternoon, police said.

At the news conference Saturday afternoon, Cundy reiterated that the time it will take to find and recover victims will be "significant."

“Both myself and colleagues from London Fire Brigade have already said it will take weeks. It may take longer than that. My commitment to families is that as soon as we can, we will locate and recover their loved ones," he told reporters. "The reason we had to pause the search and recovery yesterday was for the safety of our staff. We do not want another fatality arising out of this tragedy.”

Following a meeting of the Grenfell Tower taskforce on Saturday, London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced that a "London-wide local authority recovery operation" was established Friday in response to the devastating fire.

Khan said people were frustrated by the lack of information about the missing and the dead, as well as a lack of coordination between support services. Residents who survived the tower blaze lost everything and have no idea where they are going to live or how they will get back on their feet.

"The government must ensure the recovery operation receives all resources and expertise they need," Khan said in a statement posted to Facebook. "I have stressed to the taskforce the need for local residents and the wider public to be provided with as much information as possible and for there to be maximum transparency."

The move comes after Khan wrote an open letter to U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, who chairs the taskforce, saying people were frustrated by the lack of information about the victims, as well as a lack of coordination between support services.

"The scale of this tragedy is clearly proving too much for the local authority to cope with on their own," the mayor said in his open letter to the prime minister.

After meeting with survivors of the fire on Friday, May announced a 5 million pound ($6.4 million) fund to help them in their plight. The fund includes a guarantee to rehouse Grenfell Tower residents as close as possible to where they previously lived.

The Conservative Party leader has been criticized for failing to meet with survivors of the fire on her first visit to the site earlier this week.

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