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Thursday
Sep072017

Hurricane Irma: By the numbers 

ABC News(MIAMI) -- As Florida and parts of the southern East Coast prepare for the eventual landfall of Hurricane Irma, the storm has already made an impact in the Caribbean.

The hurricane, which experts believe is the most powerful Atlantic storm in a decade, is expected to hit Florida early Sunday morning.

Here is a rundown of how the storm has unfolded so far, and what preparations are underway.

Devastation in the Caribbean

Irma first made landfall in the Caribbean islands and left a terrifying trail of devastation behind it.

The total death toll is at least 13 people in the Caribbean, with eight killed in Saint-Martin and St. Barts, three people dead in Puerto Rico, one person dead in Anguilla and one person dead in Barbuda.

In Barbuda, over 90 percent of buildings and vehicles were destroyed.

Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne told national broadcaster ABS that the island is "barely inhabitable" after Irma.

The highest wind gust reported in San Juan, Puerto Rico, reached 63 miles per hour.

The Coast Guard has launched teams to conduct potential search-and-rescue operations and port damage assessments in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

FEMA has deployed more than 200 personnel to the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, the agency said in a statement on Tuesday. They have also brought water and meals to the Virgin Island and Puerto Rico ahead of time, with more than 700,000 liters of water and 500,000 meals at last count.

Florida braces for the storm

The number of counties issuing mandatory evacuations continues to rise.

Low-lying and coastal areas in Broward, Monroe and now Miami-Dade counties are under mandatory evacuation orders, and there are voluntary evacuation orders in place for parts of Jacksonville and Marco Island.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Thursday morning that more than 6,800 volunteers have signed up to help in the past 24 hours, but Florida needs a total of 17,000 volunteers, so he continues to urge people to reach out.

Planes, trains and naval ships

Airlines have announced more than 1,800 cancellations to and from airports in the Caribbean and Florida, though that number is expected to rise.

A number of airlines have capped the prices for flights out of south Florida. Delta has capped their flights at $399, and JetBlue and American Airlines have done so at $99.

Amtrak announced it will temporarily suspend train services in Florida due to the storm.

For its part, the Navy is preparing by trying to move as many ships out of the way as possible. Six U.S. Navy ships and one Coast Guard cutter will be leaving the U.S. Navy base at Mayport in Jacksonville because of Hurricane Irma to ride out the storm at sea. Three other ships will be moved to a “safe haven location” and made ready for the heavy weather. Two other ships will remain in port and will be “heavy weather moored.”

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(MIAMI) -- As Florida and parts of the southern East Coast prepare for the eventual landfall of Hurricane Irma, the storm has already made an impact in the Caribbean.

The hurricane, which experts believe is the most powerful Atlantic storm in a decade, is expected to hit Florida early Sunday morning.

Here is a rundown of how the storm has unfolded so far, and what preparations are underway.

Devastation in the Caribbean

Irma first made landfall in the Caribbean islands and left a terrifying trail of devastation behind it.

The total death toll is at least 13 people in the Caribbean, with eight killed in Saint-Martin and St. Barts, three people dead in Puerto Rico, one person dead in Anguilla and one person dead in Barbuda.

In Barbuda, over 90 percent of buildings and vehicles were destroyed.

Antigua and Barbuda Prime Minister Gaston Browne told national broadcaster ABS that the island is "barely inhabitable" after Irma.


The highest wind gust reported in San Juan, Puerto Rico, reached 63 miles per hour.

The Coast Guard has launched teams to conduct potential search and rescue operations and port damage assessments in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

FEMA has deployed more than 200 personnel to the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, the agency said in a statement on Tuesday. They have also brought water and meals to the Virgin Island and Puerto Rico ahead of time, with more than 700,000 liters of water and 500,000 meals at last count.

Florida braces for the storm

The number of counties issuing mandatory evacuations continues to rise.

Low-lying and coastal areas in Broward, Monroe and now Miami-Dade counties are under mandatory evacuation orders, and there are voluntary evacuation orders in place for parts of Jacksonville and Marco Island.


Florida Gov. Rick Scott said this morning that more than 6,800 volunteers have signed up to help in the past 24 hours, but Florida needs a total of 17,000 volunteers, so he continues to urge people to reach out.

Planes, trains and naval ships

Airlines have announced over 1,800 cancellations to and from airports in the Caribbean and Florida, though that number is expected to rise.

A number of airlines have capped the prices for flights out of south Florida. Delta has capped their flights at $399 and JetBlue and American Airlines have done so at $99.

Amtrak announced it will temporarily suspend train services in Florida due to the storm.

For its part, the Navy is preparing by trying to move as many ships out of the way as possible. Six U.S. Navy ships and one Coast Guard cutter will be leaving the U.S. Navy base at Mayport in Jacksonville because of Hurricane Irma to ride out the storm at sea. Three other ships will be moved to a “safe haven location” and made ready for the heavy weather. Two other ships will remain in port and will be “heavy weather moored.”






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