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Entries in Anders Behring Breivik (20)

Monday
Nov122012

Norway Shooter Anders Breivik Complains About Cold Coffee in Jail

ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images(OSLO, Norway) -- A Norwegian right-wing extremist responsible for the deadliest mass murder in his country's history is complaining about receiving inhumane treatment in prison.

Specifically, Anders Breivik is griping that his cell, along with his coffee, are always cold.

Breivik, found guilty earlier this year of the 2011 massacre of 77 people, many of them teens, is jailed in quarters that contain sections for sleeping, studying and exercising.

However, he maintains that he never gets enough butter with his bread, has to hurry through his morning shave and his handcuffs are "too sharp."

In addition, Breivik is critical of the way his cell is decorated.

Last July, the 33-year-old was judged sane by a Norwegian court and convicted on charges of terrorism and premeditated murder.  Breivik will spend a minimum of 21 years in prison rather than a mental institution and could possibly wind up behind bars for the rest of his life.

Norway, like other European countries, does not have the death penalty.

During the trial, Breivik defended his actions in court, based on the premise that Norway and the rest of the continent were becoming increasingly contaminated by allowing Muslims and other emigres to settle there and mix with Europeans.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Aug242012

Norway Shooter Anders Breivik Ruled Sane, Sentenced to Prison

ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images(OSLO, Norway) -- A right-wing extremist bent on ethnic cleansing was judged sane by a Norwegian court on Friday for last year's shooting and bomb deaths of 77 people.

The conviction on charges of terrorism and premeditated murder means that Anders Behring Breivik will spend a minimum of 21 years in prison rather than a mental institution, and could possibly wind up behind bars for the rest of his life.

Norway, like other European countries, does not have the death penalty.

Breivik, 33, was hoping not to be deemed insane.  He defended his actions in court, based on the premise that Norway and the rest of the continent were becoming increasingly contaminated by allowing Muslims and other emigres to settle there and mix with Europeans.

Breivik also claims he's the leader of a movement to crush multiculturalism, which he blames for the loss of Norway's national identity.  Many of his beliefs were detailed in a 1,500-page manifesto.

His killing spree unfolded on July 22, 2011 when a fertilizer bomb exploded outside government offices in Oslo, killing seven people.

The explosion was meant to be a diversion that enabled Breivik to board a ferry to Utoya Island, a 26-acre island that hosts a youth camp catering to the children of members of Norway's Labour Party and other prominent families.

Dressed as a police officer, Breivik proceeded to gun down 69 people, many of them teens.   When a Norwegian SWAT team finally arrived on the island and confronted the killer, he surrendered and was taken into custody.

During the trial, Breivik rejected being labeled a child murderer, claiming his victims were also to blame for multiculturalism.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jul232012

Norway Commemorates One Year Since Oslo, Utoeya Massacre

ROALD, BERIT/AFP/GettyImages(OSLO, Norway) -- As the U.S. continues to come to grips with the tragedy in Aurora, Colo., Norway spent Sunday observing the one year anniversary of its worst-ever mass shooting that left 77 people dead on July 22, 2011.

Most of the victims were young activists attending a summer camp sponsored by the Labour Party on the island of Utoeya.  Earlier that day, accused killer Anders Behring Breivik also set off bombs in Oslo as a diversionary tactic, which killed several others.  The injury toll from the entire shooting spree was put at 242.

Prime Minister Jen Stoltenberg led the day of mourning by first laying a wreath in Oslo where he told mourners, "It's been a very heavy year for all of us.  Not a day has passed the tragedy has not filled the room...The bomb and bullets were aimed at changing Norway.  The Norwegian people responded by embracing our values."

The prime minister then joined the families and friends of victims on Utoeya to pay their respects to the fallen.  Other events in Norway included church services and a concert in which American singer Bruce Springsteen performed.

Breivik, who has never denied being the gunman, remains on trial.  His rationale for the crime was to call attention to the proliferation of Muslims and other immigrants in Norway and Europe, claiming the continent was losing its national identity.

Since Norway does not have the death penalty, Breivik faces either a long prison term or treatment in a psychiatric ward depending on how the court judges his sanity.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
May112012

Massacre Victim’s Brother Throws Shoe at Norway Shooter

ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images(OSLO, Norway) -- The contentious trial of the man accused of killing dozens of people in a rampage in Norway was interrupted Friday when a supposed relative of one of the victims stood up and threw a shoe at the confessed murderer.

“You killer!  You killed my brother!  Go to hell!” the man shouted, according to reporters in the room.

The shoe reportedly missed the accused, Anders Breivik, but clipped one of his lawyers, Vibeke Hein.  The incident was met with applause by some in the audience.

Breivik has confessed to killing 77 people -- a majority of them teenagers -- in a bombing and shooting rampage, but claimed it was an act of self-defense and the first move in a new crusade against “multi-culturalism” in Europe.

In a 1,500-page manifesto posted online before the attack, Breivik claims to have been just one operative in a group called the new Knights Templar that would lead a violent conservative Christian revolution -- a battle that, by Breivik’s prediction, would last 60 years.

Last month, the extremist testified that his original plan also included the beheading of the Norwegian prime minister and the bombing of Norway’s royal palace. 

Early in the trial, Breivik teared up, but not apparently for his victims.  He started to weep when the court showed a propaganda video he had created.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Apr192012

Norway Killer Wanted to Behead Prime Minister on Camera

ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Anders Behring Breivik, who has admitted killing 77 people in twin terror attacks in Norway last summer, testified Thursday that his original plan included chopping off the head of former Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland and posting a video of the beheading on the web.

"The plan to was to behead Gro Harlem Brundtland while it was being filmed," Breivik said in court Thursday. "It was meant to be a very powerful psychological weapon."

Breivik, a right-wing extremist who claims he committed the July 2011 murders to protest Islamic immigration to Europe, said he got the idea of decapitation from al Qaeda videos.

Breivik said he had also intended to bomb Norway's royal palace and the headquarters of Norway's Labor Party. After detonating explosives in central Oslo that killed eight, he stormed the nearby resort island of Utoya, where the Labor Party was holding a youth rally, and shot and killed 69 people.

Testifying at the fourth day of his trial, Breivik explained that he had to change his plans to set off three bombs in Oslo when building a single fertilizer-based bomb proved difficult. He said he chose the summer youth retreat of the ruling Labor Party as a target when he failed to prepare in time for a meeting of journalists and the Labor Party's annual meeting.

Brundtland had appeared at the youth retreat, but had left by the time Breivik arrived.

Breivik explained that he prepped for the Utoya Island massacre by playing the computer games "World of Warcraft" and "Modern Warfare" for hours daily. He shot his victims with two weapons named after Norse gods.

The confessed killer showed no remorse for his victims Thursday, referring to them as "traitors." He believes that members of Norway's liberal elite betrayed the country by opening it to Muslim immigration.

Breivik cried on the first day of his trial, which began Monday, but not for those he killed. He confessed to the murders, and then began crying after they played a portion of a propaganda video he had made in support of his new "crusade" in Norway.

Before the massacre, Breivik posted a 1,500-page manifesto online in which he said he was just one operative in a group called the new Knights Templar that would lead a violent conservative Christian revolution in Europe. On Tuesday, he said the Knights Templar would lead a revolt against "multiculturalist" governments.

The 33-year-old had rejected an insanity defense, saying he considered an insanity diagnosis "the ultimate humiliation." Though he was found insane in an initial examination, a second team of doctors found him to be sane.

His defense is expected to try to prove his sanity by calling both Islamic extremists and right-wing extremists to the stand during his trial to demonstrate that he is not the only one who believes "Europe is the setting for a war of religion."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Apr182012

Accused Norweigian Mass Murderer Boasts He Would Do It Again

AFP/Getty Images(OSLO, Norway) -- The people of Norway and the rest of the world got their first real insight on Tuesday into the mindset of Anders Behring Breivik, who is standing trial in Oslo for the murder of 77 Norwegians last July, most of them young people attending a camp.

Breivik, who has not denied perpetrating Norway's deadliest murderous rampage, boldly told the court, "I would have done it again."

Showing virtually no signs of remorse, Breivik asserted, "This was the most sophisticated and spectacular political attack committed in Europe since the Second World War.  If one can force the Norwegian Labour party to change their immigration policy by executing 77 people, that will contribute to holding our values and culture."

The 33-year-old had previously confessed to first detonating a car bomb in the center of Oslo to create a diversion before embarking on a killing spree on Utoya Island where children of politicians from Norway and other countries attended a camp every summer.

Breivik has explained his rationale for the murders was to protest what he saw as the sublimation of Norway and Europe by Muslims.

Reading for an hour from a 20-page statement with few interruptions, Breivik explained, "I acted in defense of my culture and of my people and so I ask to be acquitted."

While there's little chance of that happening, Norway does not have the death penalty and it's most probable that Breivik will spend the rest of his life in a mental institution rather than prison.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Apr162012

Norway Shooter Anders Breivik Pleads Not Guilty, Cries in Court

AFP/Getty Images(OSLO, Norway) -- The right wing extremist who has confessed to murdering 77 people -- many of them teenagers -- in a shooting and bombing spree in Norway last year cried at the start of his trial on Monday, but not for his victims.

Anders Breivik told the court he acknowledged the mass murder, but pleaded not guilty, claiming it was done in self-defense as part of his war against "multiculturalism" in the European nation.  He expressed no emotion as he entered his plea, but broke down and had to wipe away tears when the court played a portion of a propaganda video he had made in support of his new "crusade" in Norway.

Breivik is accused of carrying out the July 2011 bombing in Oslo, Norway, that killed eight people, followed by a shooting spree at a nearby youth summer camp that claimed another 69 lives.

Before the massacre, Breivik posted a 1,500 page manifesto online in which he said he was just one operative in the beginning of a violent Christian conservative revolution in Europe led by a group called the new Knights Templar.  Breivik had planned on a 60-plus year struggle against mutliculturalism until the Knights would take control over Europe, the manifesto said.

A court official pointed out on Monday that in a picture Breivik had apparently taken of himself, he had digitally altered the image to include a patch that read, "Multicultural Traitor Hunting Permit… Tagging Not Required… No Bag Limit."

Breivik said on Monday that he did not recognize the authority of the court since it got its "mandate from the Norwegian political parties who support multiculturalism."

In his manifesto, Breivik said that getting arrested and put on trial was just another part of the overall plan.

"Your arrest will mark the initiation of the propaganda phase," he wrote.  "Your trial offers you a stage to the world."

A panel of experts recently found Breivik was sane and fit to stand trial, contradicting an earlier psychiatric report that said Breivik suffered from paranoid schizophrenia.  Both Breivik and some of the families of his victims objected to the first diagnosis.

The families want Breivik to be legally responsible for his actions, and Breivik said in a 38-page letter to the Norwegian media that he considered the insanity diagnosis the "ultimate humiliation."

Breivik's defense is expected to try to prove his sanity by calling both Islamic extremists and right-wing extremists to the stand to demonstrate that others believe "Europe is the setting for a war of religion" and, therefore, Breivik's belief in such a conflict are not delusional, according to Breivik's lawyer, Geir Lippestad. 

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Apr102012

Norway Shooter Anders Breivik 'Regrets Not Going Further'

AFP/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Right-wing extremist Anders Breivik, who has admitted killing 77 people during a politically-motivated murder spree in Norway last summer, has been declared sane and fit to stand trial and will probably take the stand.

"The experts' main conclusion is that the accused Anders Behring Breivik was not psychotic during the events on 22 July 2011," a Norwegian court said in a statement. "That means that he is considered criminally responsible at the time of the crime."

An earlier psychiatric report had found that Breivik suffered from paranoid schizophrenia. Both Breivik and some of the families of his victims objected to the diagnosis.

The families want Breivik to be legally responsible for his actions, and Breivik said in a 38-page letter to the Norwegian media that he considered the insanity diagnosis the "ultimate humiliation."

Breivik has confessed to detonating bombs that killed eight people in downtown Oslo and to killing 69 people with a rifle on the nearby resort island of Utoya. Breivik said he committed the acts as part of a war on Islamic immigration to Norway and had targeted government offices and the youth summer camp of Norway's ruling political party. He also told police that he had considered attacking U.S. President Barack Obama with a car bomb when Obama visited Oslo in December 2009 to accept the Nobel Peace Prize.

Breivik's trial begins April 16. His defense attorney, Geir Lippestad, has said that the Breivik wants to be found guilty of the twin attacks. "He wants to be found sane and accountable," said Lippestad.

Lippestad also said that Breivik will provide an explanation for his actions. "He will not only defend his actions," said Lippestad, "but will also lament, I think, not going further."

Given his client's wishes, Lippestad will portray Breivik as sane, but as an extremist. To bolster his case, he plans to call both Islamic extremists and right-wing extremists to the stand. Lippestad says he will call Mullah Krekar, an Islamic extremist now resident in Norway, as a witness. Krekar, who once headed Ansar al-Islam, an Islamist group in Kurdish Iraq, has admitted meeting with Osama bin Laden and requesting backing for his group.

Lippestad said he wants to demonstrate that "Islamists also believe that Europe is the setting for a war of religion" and that therefore Breivik's belief in such a conflict is not delusional. Breivik has written a 1,500 page manifesto outlining his motives.

The attorney told the French newspaper Le Monde that he also plans to call the Norwegian anti-Islamic blogger who goes by the name Fjordman to the stand. Breivik quoted Fjordman, whose real name is Peder Jensen, in his massive manifesto.

In their new report, psychiatrists said there was no evidence that mental illness had "significantly weakened" his ability to evaluate the outside world realistically. The doctors said they would provide more detail on Breivik's mental state in court.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Mar072012

Breivik Indicted in Norway Attacks

AFP/Gett​y Images(OSLO, Norway) -- Anders Behring Breivik was indicted Wednesday for terror acts in the killing of 77 people last year.

Breivik confessed to the July 22 attacks in which 244 were wounded. He initially planted a car bomb in Oslo and then drove to the island of Utoeya, where he shot a number of young people at a summer camp.

The 33-year-old said he committed the crimes to prevent a Muslim invasion in Europe. Breivik faces up to 21 years in prison, however, his lawyers argued that their client is mentally ill and should be placed in a psychiatric facility, reports BBC News. He will undergo a psychiatric evaluation.

Breivik is scheduled to go on trial April 16.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Nov292011

Confessed Norway Killer Anders Breivik Is Insane, Doctors Say

AFP/Getty Images(OSLO, Norway) -- Anders Breivik, the man who confessed to ruthlessly killing more than 70 people in a bombing and shooting spree in Norway, has been declared mentally insane by court-appointed doctors, according to media reports.

A panel of psychiatrists said on Tuesday that Breivik suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and was insane both during the massacre and during the 13 interviews two psychiatrists had with him.  The panel recommended Breivik be held at a psychiatric ward rather than prison.

Though he has pleaded not guilty to charges against him, Breivik freely admitted that he attacked the country's liberal party for their "treason" and even reenacted the deadly shooting for investigators in August.

In the aftermath of the bloody massacre, investigators discovered Breivik had posted a 1,500-page manifesto online in which he said he was just one operative in the beginning of a violent Christian conservative revolution in Europe led by members of the new Knights Templar.  Breivik had apparently worked clandestinely for months, meticulously planning his deadly attack from an isolated farmhouse in Norway.

Breivik had planned on a 60-plus year struggle against mutliculturalism until the Knights would take control over Europe, the manifesto said.  One of the order's primary weapons, Breivik wrote, is the use of one-man terror cells.

"Chop-chop <3 For those of you who does [sic] not want to wait this long, should immediately ordinate yourself as a Justiciar Knight for the KT [Knights Templar]," he writes.  "Any self-appointed Justiciar Knight has been given the authority by [Knights Templar]... to act as a judge, jury and executioner until the free, indigenous peoples of Europe are no longer threatened by cultural genocide."

After his arrest, Breivik's lawyer said the suspected mass murderer made two lists of demands from jail -- one for practical jailhouse items like cigarettes and clothes, and another with far more bizarre requests including the complete overthrow of the Norwegian government and the promise of a key role in the future of the country.

He also wanted the mental evaluation to be conducted by Japanese specialists because they "understand the idea of values of honor," Breivik said, according to attorney Geir Lippestad.

Such demands, Lippestad said in August, were "unrealistic -- far, far from the real world and shows he doesn't know how society works."

The psychiatrists' report will be further reviewed by the Norwegian Board of Forensic Medicine, according to media reports.  Breivik is scheduled to stand trial for his crimes on April 16.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







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