SEARCH

Entries in Cars (4)

Wednesday
Jan042012

Two-Thirds of UK Drivers Confused by Basic Road Signs

Comstock/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- Most Americans would agree that folks in England drive on the wrong side of the road. While that's a matter of perspective, a new poll shows Yank drivers may be onto something about the driving abilities of their UK counterparts.

A new survey reveals that motorists in the U.K. really are at a loss when it comes to the rules of the road.  The Daily Mail reports a U.K. survey commissioned by Castrol finds two-thirds of motorists in Britain are totally confused by basic road signs on a daily basis.

The study also found that one in three British drivers get so confused by simple highway signs, they simply follow the car in front when they're not sure what to do.

One in 20 motorists surveyed even admitted that they “never” take notice of highway signs.  Three percent confessed that their confusion has led to them having a car accident.

When shown a “Give Way” sign -- the U.K.’s version of the United States' “Yield” sign -- 50 percent of respondents didn’t know what it meant and one in 20 believed it required them to roll down their window and listen for approaching cars.

One third of those polled said a sign that reads “No Motor Vehicles Allowed” meant the exact opposite that only cars and motorcycles were allowed.

And one in four Brits believe a sign that reads “End of 30mph Speed Limit” means they are not allowed to drop below 30mph.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Dec052011

Exotic Vehicles Involved in $4 Million Car Crash in Japan

YOMIURI SHIMBUN/AFP/Getty Images(TOKYO) -- In what is being called the “world’s most expensive car crash,” 14 vehicles, including eight Ferraris, three Mercedes-Benz cars and a Lamborghini Diablo, were involved in a huge pileup Sunday morning on an expressway in southwest Japan.

Witnesses reported wet conditions on the roadway at the time of the crash, which is believed to have started when the driver of one Ferrari struck a center median after losing control while trying to pass another Ferrari on a long curve.  The eight Ferraris and the Lamborghini were being driven by members of an exotic sports car club.

Two of the Mercedes were traveling on the other side of the highway in the opposite direction, and got caught in the crash when they were struck by flying debris.  The accident also involved a Nissan and a Toyota Prius.

Ten people were treated at a local hospital for minor injuries.

Television footage of the scene showed wrecked cars and broken glass and metal strewn across both sides of the highway.

Authorities estimate the total damage to the vehicles involved at $4 million.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov282011

Toyota Unveils Futuristic Smartphone Concept Car

Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg via Getty Images(TOKYO) -- The brand new Toyota Fun-Vii is designed to look and feel like a “smartphone on wheels.” The freshly revealed model, which stands for Vehicle interactive Internet, has a number of features allowing users to customize the car’s appearance and connect to the web while driving.

“A car must appeal to our emotions. If it’s not fun, it’s not a car,” Toyota president Akio Yoyoda said.

At just over 13 feet long and almost six feet wide, the model is slim, and its sleek body panels can change to display the user’s favorite photos, text messages, or other media.

In Toyota’s presentation, which took place at a Toyota amusement-park facility, the futuristic car recognized and greeted its driver. And once inside, the driver operated the car without lifting a finger -- relying on speech-controlled directions instead.

The Fun-Vii was revealed just ahead of the Tokyo Auto Show, scheduled for this weekend. But Toyota doesn’t plan to put the model on road any time soon; the company said the Fun-Vii will remain a futuristic concept car for now.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Thursday
May192011

Japanese Automakers Shift Work Week to Save Power

Comstock/Thinkstock(TOKYO) -- Japan's auto industry is the latest in that country to make changes to its work week in hopes of conserving energy. The Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association announced carmakers would take Thursday and Friday off -- and shift to a Saturday to Wednesday work week, so they can make cars during off-peak hours.

The new schedule begins in July, and comes days after the government asked major companies to reduce electricity by 15 percent this summer. The country's nuclear power plants were shut down immediately after the March 11 earthquake and subsequent tsunami struck the northern part of Japan. Seventy-five percent of those plants still remain idle, creating a huge strain on Japan's power supply.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio