SEARCH

Entries in Deportation (7)

Thursday
Dec062012

Guatemala Could Deport John McAfee Back to Belize

JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images(GUATEMALA CITY) -- Software anti-virus pioneer John McAfee is in the process of being deported to Belize after he was arrested in Guatemala for entering the country illegally, his attorney told ABC News early Thursday.

ABC News has learned that McAfee is scheduled to be deported to Belize later Thursday morning.  But a judge could stay the ruling if it is determined McAfee's life is threatened by being in Belizean custody, as McAfee has claimed over the past several weeks.

Just hours before his arrest, McAfee told ABC News in an exclusive interview on Wednesday that he would be seeking asylum in Guatemala.  He was arrested by the Central American country's immigration police and not the national police, said his attorney, who was confident his client would be released within hours.

"Thank God I am in a place where there is some sanity," said McAfee, 67, before his arrest.  "I chose Guatemala carefully."

McAfee said that in Guatemala, the locals aren't surprised when he says the Belizean government is out to kill him.

"Instead of going, 'You're crazy,' they go, 'Yeah, of course they are,'" he said.  "It's like, finally, I understand people who understand the system here."

But McAfee added he has not ruled out moving back to the United States, where he made his fortune as the inventor of anti-virus software, and that despite losing much of his fortune, he still has more money than he could ever spend.

In his interview with ABC News, a jittery, animated but candid McAfee called the media's representation of him a "nightmare that is about to explode," and said he's prepared to prove his sanity.

McAfee has been on the run from police in Belize since the Nov. 10 murder of his neighbor, fellow American expatriate Greg Faull.

During his three-week journey, said McAfee, he disguised himself as handicapped, dyed his hair seven times and hid in many different places during his three-week journey.

He dismissed accounts of erratic behavior and reports that he had been using the synthetic drug bath salts.  He said he had never used the drug, and said statements that he had were part of an elaborate prank.

Investigators said that McAfee was not a suspect in the death of the former developer, who was found shot in the head in his house on the resort island of San Pedro, but that they wanted to question him.

McAfee told ABC News that the poisoning death of his dogs and the murder just hours later of Faull, who had complained about his dogs, was a coincidence.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Nov142012

Muslim Cleric Avoids Deportation to Jordan

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(LONDON) -- A Muslim cleric who has spent most of the last 10 years in custody in the U.K. was released on bail Tuesday after a court ruled he might not be able to get a fair trial if deported to Jordan, where he faces terrorism charges.

The court ruled in favor of Abu Qatada’s appeal against deportation after determining that witness evidence obtained by torture may be used against him at trial.

Qatada was charged with allegedly conspiring to target Western and Israeli targets with explosives in Jordan in 1998 and 1999.  He was found guilty of terrorism charges in abstentia in 1999.

Security experts say Qatada is a spiritual leader who has spread support for suicide bombings.

Both the British government and the Jordanian government expressed disappointment with the court’s ruling.

British Prime Minister David Cameron said his government would “take all the steps necessary to ensure that Qatada does not present a risk to national security.”

Legal experts say Qatada’s deportation remains unlikely as long as the possibility of witnesses providing evidence obtained by torture remains.  The case is expected to continue for years.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Aug312012

Canada Says First US Woman Military Deserter Must Be Deported

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(TORONTO) -- Army veteran Kimberly Rivera is due to return to the U.S. by Sept. 20 but not because she wants to.

She has lived in Toronto since 2007 after having served as an Army private in Iraq in 2006.  When she was ordered redeployed to the war zone, Rivera became the first woman in history to flee the U.S. military for Canada where she was joined by her family.

According to the War Resisters Support Campaign, the Canada Border Services Agency said that Rivera must go back to the U.S., apparently not believing that she will receive a stiff punishment for desertion.

However, Robin Long and Clifford Cornell, two American war resisters deported to the U.S., wound up facing year-long jail sentences because they refused deployment to Iraq.

Rivera initially applied for refugee status and has since appealed to stay in Canada on a humanitarian compassionate grounds claim.  It's expected she will fight her deportation through the courts.

Rivera is married with four children, two of whom were born in Canada.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
May242012

ICE Deports Human Rights Violator to Bosnia for Crimes Against Humanity

PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images(LAS VEGAS) -- Dejan Radojkovic, a former Bosnian-Serb police commander, Wednesday was deported to his native country, Bosnia and Herzegovina, for genocide crimes and atrocities against the Bosnian people. The deportation concluded a successful effort by the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement office (ICE) that investigated the case.

“I applaud the outstanding work by ICE attorneys, Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) special agents, and ERO officers in bringing a successful conclusion to this case. We will continue to work tirelessly to ensure our country does not serve as a haven for human rights violators and others who have committed heinous acts,” ICE Director John Morton said Thursday in a statement.
 
Upon arriving in the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo Thursday, Radojkovic, 61, was immediately turned over to Bosnian law enforcement officials.
 
A former Las Vegas resident, Radojkovic faces charges for his role in the Srebrenica genocide. The genocide took place over the course of several days in July 1995 when thousands of Bosnian Muslims, mainly men and boys, were led to a “safe area” and then executed.
 
Authorities allege that Radojkovic used his position as a commander in the Special Forces Brigade to carry out the crimes.

ICE worked closely with Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), Bosnian and Herzegovina prosecution as well as international court to complete the removal of Radojkovic from the United States.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan062012

American Teen Deported to Colombia Is Heading Home

PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images(DALLAS) -- Jakadrien Turner, the American teen who was mistakenly deported to Colombia, was put on a plane Friday bound for home in Texas.

"She is on a plane back to the U.S. as we speak," Ray Jackson, a lawyer for Turner's family, told ABC News.

The lawyer said that while the family is thrilled, they are also planning lawsuits.

"We are exploring a civil rights law suit against ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), Houston Police and Colombian government... There is an egregious injustice and the ball has been dropped. ICE is the main culprit, but there are many parts of it where there is negligence," he said.

Turner, who turned 15 while in Colombia, was taken into custody by the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare on Dec. 1 after authorities determined she was a minor and an American.

During her time in Colombia, Turner was included in a government program called Welcome Home, which provided her with counseling, shelter and a job at a call center, according to the Colombian Institute for Family Welfare.

She posted often on Facebook under the name TiKa SoloToolonq, occasionally referencing her life in Houston and Dallas, and speaking of efforts to learn Spanish. She never indicated any attempts to move back to the United States, and while she often complained of boredom and unhappiness in Colombia, she appeared to be making a life there and was listed as "in a relationship" on Facebook.

Turner's bizarre adventure came to an end after her grandmother scoured the social networking site until she found her granddaughter and alerted authorities.

The teen was originally picked up by police in Houston for theft on Nov. 19, 2010, marking the last day her family had seen or heard from her.

During police questioning, officials said Turner gave the name Tika Lanay Cortez, a name Immigration and Customs Enforcement contends she simply made up, and told them she was a 21-year-old from Colombia with no identification. She continued to maintain her alias throughout the investigation and told officials she had no legal status in the U.S., an ICE statement said.

A number of database searches, which included checking her fingerprints, turned up nothing that contradicted her story, and according to ICE, they had no way of knowing that her story wasn't true. A missing persons report was filed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, but an ICE spokesperson said that didn't show up in the course of the investigation.

Once she was convicted, Turner was handed over to ICE, to whom she maintained she was a Colombian citizen, even while being interviewed by a representative from the Colombian consulate. Eventually, the Colombian authorities agreed she was a Colombian citizen, and authorized her deportation, providing her with full Colombian citizenship upon arrival in the country.

Her family says they don't understand how something like this could have happened. "They didn't do their work," the girl's grandmother, Lorene Turner told ABC affiliate WFAA. "How do you deport a teenager and send her to Colombia without a passport, without anything?"

ICE says it is investigating the matter. It's unclear what Turner's motives might have been for providing police with a false identity. The agency insists it takes the, "responsibility to verify the immigration status of individuals in the agency's custody very seriously."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jan052012

14-Year-Old US Citizen Deported to Colombia

PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images(DALLAS) -- A 14-year-old American citizen has been living in a Central American country since last year after being deported by U.S. officials.

Jakadrien Turner had been missing from her home in Dallas since Nov. 19, 2010, when she was picked up by police in Houston for theft. She had no identifying documentation with her. During police questioning, officials said Turner gave the name Tika Lanay Cortez (a name Immigration and Customs Enforcement contends she simply made up), and told them she was a 21-year-old from Colombia.

She continued to maintain that identity throughout the investigation process, and told officials she had no legal status in the U.S., an ICE statement said. A number of database searches, which included checking her fingerprints, turned up nothing that contradicted her story, and according to ICE, they had no way of knowing that her story wasn't true. A missing persons report was filed with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, but an ICE spokesperson said that didn't show up in the course of the investigation.

An ICE official told ABC News that people who do enter the U.S. illegally often have no documentation whatsoever to identify them or a country of origin. So, they took Turner at her word when she insisted she was a 21-year-old Colombian citizen.

"[Turner] maintained this false identity throughout her local criminal proceedings in Texas where she was represented by a defense attorney and ultimately convicted," an ICE statement said. "At no time during these criminal proceedings was her identity determined to be false."

Once she was convicted, she was handed over to ICE, where she still said she was a Colombian citizen, even while being interviewed by a representative from the Colombian consulate. Eventually, the Colombian authorities agreed she was a Colombian citizen and authorized her deportation, providing her with full Colombian citizenship upon arrival in the country.

During her time in Colombia, Turner posted often on Facebook, under the name "TiKa SoloToolonq," occasionally referencing her life in Houston and Dallas, and speaking of efforts to learn Spanish. She never indicated any attempts to move back to the United States, and while she often complained of boredom and unhappiness in Colombia, she appeared to be making a life there.

Her family says they don't understand how something like this could have happened.

"I'm flabbergasted," her mother, Johnisa Turner, told ABC News affiliate WFAA. "Something definitely has to change."

Her grandmother, Lorene Turner, was the one who eventually found Jakadrian on Facebook, after months of searching.

"They didn't do their work," she told WFAA. "How do you deport a teenager and send her to Colombia without a passport, without anything?"

WFAA reports Turner is being held in a detention center in Colombia, and Colombian authorities refuse to turn her over. ICE officials say they can't confirm those reports.

Still, her grandmother says she's optimistic.

"I feel like she will come home," Lorene told WFAA. "I just need help and prayer."

For their part, ICE says they are investigating the matter. It's unclear what Turner's motives might have been for providing police with a false identity. They say they take their "responsibility to verify the immigration status of individuals in the agency's custody very seriously."

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jun032011

Woman Who Claimed Rape by Gadhafi Forces Returned to Libya

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(GENEVA) -- Iman al-Obeidi, the Libyan woman who dramatically burst into a Tripoli hotel where journalists were staying accusing Moammar Gadhafi's forces of gang raping her, was deported from Qatar back to Libya Thursday.

Al-Obeidi fled to Tunisia and then to Qatar following her arrest and subsequent release.  Vincent Cochetel, the spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), told ABC News that al-Obeidi was flown to eastern Libya at midday on a military plane since there are no commercial flights into Benghazi.

Cochetel says al-Obeidi feared returning to Libya and that she was sent back “by force.”

Officially, al-Obeidi was deported because she had overstayed her visa, despite her refugee status in Qatar.  The UNHCR says this is the first time Qatar has abruptly forced a deportation before they could find another resettlement country.

UNHCR says al-Obeidi is now in a Benghazi hotel.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio