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Entries in Emergency (2)

Thursday
Apr122012

Oklahoma City 911 Dispatchers Save Woman in Ireland

iStockphoto/Thinsktock(OKLAHOMA CITY) -- A 911 team in Oklahoma is being lauded during National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week for saving the life of a woman 4,000 miles away.

During the early hours of March 2, the distressed woman called the seven-digit, non-emergency number for the Oklahoma City dispatch.

“She was suicidal, had a gun and said she was going to kill herself,” David Shupe, director of 911 services, said. “Her biggest concern was making sure someone was contacted so her child would be OK.  She said repeatedly she was trying to get out of the life of prostitution.”

Shupe said he had no idea how the woman got the number for emergency services or what, if any, her familiarity with Oklahoma City was, but his dispatchers knew they needed to help.

Because she called the seven-digit number instead of 911, dispatchers were unable to track her location. “We managed ultimately to keep her on the phone for 30 minutes,” he said.

During that time, the 911 supervisor contacted AT&T, which traced the call to the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea. The supervisor then contacted their police department, which, in turn, was able to trace the call to Dublin, Shupe said.

Police visited the woman’s home where they found her with a stab wound to the arm. She was transported to a hospital for treatment.

“This was a pretty interesting piece of work from our perspective,” Shupe said.  “We don’t typically get involved with overseas departments. It was pretty innovative how the supervisor handled it.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Mar142011

Japan Seeks U.S. Help With Nuclear Reactor Emergency

Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images(TOKYO) -- The Japanese government formally asked the United States' Nuclear Regulatory Commission for help in stabilizing its troubled nuclear reactors in the wake of the country's massive earthquake and tsunami.

The NRC sent two boiling water reactor experts to Japan as part of a team of aid workers to help in the recovery efforts. A series of nuclear reactors continue to deteriorate at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, raising worries of a nuclear meltdown.

After two hydrogen explosions in three days at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, a third reactor has lost its ability to cool. Officials are increasingly concerned about unit 2 at the plant.

"They continue to work hard to raise the water level to cover the fuel. Let's pray again," Tatsujiro Suzuki, vice chairman of Japan's Atomic Energy Commission, posted on Facebook Monday.

The fuel rods on unit 2 have been fully exposed for the second time Monday, a dangerous development in the effort to stop the reactor from melting down. The exposure of the fuel rods means that the temperature in the reactor is likely to rise, which will allow it to make steam. The steam could lead to the creation of hydrogen and cause another explosion, experts said.

Knowing how long the fuel rods have been exposed is key to understanding if there is a real chance of a meltdown, said Dr. Peter Hosemann, a nuclear energy expert and professor at the University of California at Berkeley.

Japanese officials acknowledged that the fuel rods appear to be melting inside all three of the reactors at the Fukashima plant.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio