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Entries in Gaza (34)

Friday
Jan042013

Smuggled Gaza-Bound Missiles US Made? Maybe Not

MAJDI FATHI/AFP/Getty Images(CAIRO, Egypt) -- Egyptian authorities say that the six anti-tank and anti-aircraft missiles they seized from alleged smugglers headed for Gaza were of U.S. origin – but weapons proliferation experts cast doubt on the claim.

The weapons, which were intercepted in the Sinai desert, were believed to have come from Libya and to have been manufactured by U.S. firms, Egyptian security sources told reporters.

But Peter Bouckaert of Human Rights Watch, who tracked weapons in Libya after the fall of Gadhafi, said he "was not aware of any American weapons in Libya neither from the days of Gadhafi nor under the rebels."

"This is probably a misidentification of weapons systems, confusing weapons made by NATO allies such as France and Italy with U.S.-made weapons," said Bouckaert.

The U.S. State Department bans the sale and transfer of lethal defense materials to Libya.

Since the fall of Libya's longtime dictator Gadhafi at the hands of the rebels in 2011, weapons have been transferred from Libya to Gaza through the Sinai desert, though none have been documented as U.S.-made, according to Human Rights Watch. The weapons smuggled have mainly been Soviet and Warsaw Pact shoulder-launched surface-to-air missiles, known as Manpads, as well as Belgian FM 2000 rifles and Russian AK-1032 rifles.

The missiles seized in the Sinai Friday reportedly have a range of up to one mile and were buried in a hole outside the city of el-Arish in the Sinai desert early Friday morning according to Ma'an.

The Sinai desert has been a main passageway for weapons smuggling into Gaza. It is dominated by Bedouin tribes and has seen a security vacuum since the Egyptian uprising in February 2011. Through a complex system of underground tunnels, Hamas, the militant Palestinian faction that rules the Gaza strip, as well as other armed groups have been able to smuggle Iranian-made long and medium-range rockets as well as raw materials to make explosives.

Last month Egyptian security forces seized 17 French-made missiles en route to Gaza, according to news reports.

There has been mounting pressure on Egypt to stymie weapons smuggling to Gaza since the ceasefire that ended the last round of hostilities between Israel and Gaza in November 2012.

Israel has imposed a blockade on the Gaza strip since 2007 which includes weapons as well as many basic goods such as food stuffs, medical supplies and stationery.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Nov212012

Israeli Bus Explodes in Tel Aviv as Diplomats Work Toward Truce

MAJDI FATHI/AFP/Getty ImagesUPDATE: Israel and Hamas have agreed to a ceasefire, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced Wednesday.

(TEL AVIV, Israel) -- A bomb ripped through an Israeli bus near the nation's military headquarters in Tel Aviv Wednesday, wounding more than a dozen people, Israeli officials said.

The bus exploded around noon local time in one of the city's busiest areas, near the Tel Aviv museum.  Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said authorities were investigating whether the bomb had been planted and left on the bus or whether it was the work of a suicide bomber.

Overnight, the violence between Israel and the neighboring Gaza Strip continued as Israeli aircraft pounded Gaza with dozens of strikes, hitting government ministries, underground tunnels, a banker's empty villa and a Hamas-linked media office.  Gaza health officials said there were no deaths or injuries.

The Israeli Defense Force said they've now destroyed 50 underground rocket launching sites in Gaza.  The IDF also said that two rockets were fired from Gaza toward densely populated areas in Israel, but were intercepted by the "Iron Dome" missile shield.

In Gaza, at least four strikes within seconds of each other pulverized a complex of government ministries the size of a city block, rattling nearby buildings and shattering windows.  Hours later, clouds of acrid dust still hung over the area and smoke still rose from the rubble.

In downtown Gaza City, another strike leveled the empty, two-story home of a well-known banker and buried a police car parked nearby in rubble.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Ramallah early Wednesday to try to help broker a truce between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip to end a week of tit-for-tat missile and rocket fire.

Israel and the Hamas militant group seemed to edge closer to a ceasefire on Tuesday but after a day of furious diplomatic efforts, a deal remained elusive and fighting raged on both sides of the border.

Israeli officials told ABC News that a window of opportunity for a deal could close if Hamas refuses to agree to a long-term ceasefire.  That ceasefire would be measured in years, not months.  Hamas is demanding that Israel loosen its iron grip on Gaza's borders and ease its maritime blockade.

Clinton will also meet with Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi in Cairo later on Wednesday.  The U.S. will not meet with Hamas because it considers it a terrorist group.

On Tuesday, Clinton met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for more than two hours behind closed doors, saying she sought to "de-escalate the situation in Gaza."  Clinton hinted it would take some time to finally reach an agreement.

The meeting came amid statements from Hamas earlier in the day that a ceasefire would soon be announced.  Netanyahu said he would prefer to use "diplomatic means" to find a solution to the fighting, but that Israel would take "whatever actions necessary" to defend its people.

Clinton relayed a message from President Obama, reinforcing America's commitment to Israel's security and calling for an end to the rockets coming from "terrorist organizations in Gaza."

She added that she would reiterate her message to Morsi when they meet later on Wednesday.

The rocket fire between Israel and Hamas, which began seven days ago, has claimed more than 138 Palestinian lives and five Israeli lives.  Half the Palestinian deaths were civilians; four of the five Israelis were civilians.  A ceasefire, if reached, would bring a halt to the worst violence between Gaza and Israel in four years.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Nov202012

Hamas Leader Dares Israel to Deploy Ground Troops

GIANLUIGI GUERCIA/AFP/Getty Images(GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip) -- Hamas leader Khaled Meshal is calling Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's bluff, a move that could backfire on the Palestinian enclave of Gaza straining to survive an onslaught of Israeli rockets.

As the death toll mounted on the Palestinian side Monday and with no signs of a ceasefire, Meshal dared Netanyahu to follow through on a threat to launch a ground invasion in an effort to end Hamas' own missile attacks on Israel.

Israel has at least 75,000 thousand reservists ready if the Israeli prime minister gives the word.   But Meshal boasted to reporters in Gaza City that Netanyahu would have sent troops in by now if he was serious about an invasion that the Hamas head said was Israel's way to "dictate its own terms and force us into silence."

Meshal also dismissed attempts to reach a truce with Israel, suggesting that the onus was on his group's bitter foe to stop "its aggression, assassinations and invasions" so that Palestinians in the Gaza Strip no longer have to live in fear.

Israel began "Operation Pillar of Defense" last Wednesday following non-stop rocket attacks by Hamas that have gone on for months.  The latest death toll figures put the number of Palestinian fatalities over 100, many of them civilians.  Israel suffered three deaths during the past week and as many as 80 people wounded.

Netanyahu reportedly met with his Cabinet and military leaders Monday night about what Israel's next move will be.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
Nov202012

Hillary Clinton to Travel to Middle East Amid Gaza Crisis

Alex Wong/Getty ImagesUPDATE: A ceasefire in the Middle East is expected to be announced later Tuesday at a press conference in Cairo, Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum tells ABC News.

(PHNOM PENH, Cambodia) -- President Obama dispatched Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to the Middle East on Tuesday with the hope that she can bring an end to the escalating violence that has gripped the region for the last week.

Clinton is scheduled to arrive in Jerusalem later Tuesday night to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, according to Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes.  She will also meet with Palestinian officials in Ramallah before heading to Cairo to meet with leaders in Egypt.

A senior Israeli government official told ABC News that Netanyahu has decided to hold off on a ground invasion for a "limited time" in favor of a diplomatic solution.

Overnight, Israeli jets hit more than 100 targets, killing five people.  Gaza militants blasted more than 60 rockets in retaliation, with one of them hitting a bus in southern Israel.

Meanwhile, an Israeli man armed with an axe and knife stabbed a guard at the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv Tuesday.  The guard was wounded in the attack, but is expected to live.  Police said they apprehended the man at the scene and have named no motive for the attack.

"It's in nobody's interest to see this escalate," Rhodes said at a press conference Tuesday in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, where President Obama was attending the East Asia Summit.

Clinton departed from Cambodia following the announcement.  She was with Obama on his trip to Southeast Asia.

A State Department official told ABC News that Clinton's visit "will build on American engagement with regional leaders over the past days."

A White House official said they felt face-to-face diplomacy could help but no concrete details were offered.

Obama was on the phone until 2:30 a.m. local time with leaders in the region trying to de-escalate the violence, Rhodes told reporters.  The president spoke with Netanyahu and Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi on Monday as well.

"To date, we're encouraged by the cooperation and the consultation we've had with the Egyptian leadership.  We want to see that, again, support a process that can de-escalate the situation," Rhodes said.  "But again, the bottom line still remains that Hamas has to stop this rocket fire."

Rhodes insisted that Palestinian officials need to be a part of the discussions to end the violence and rocket fire coming out of the Hamas-ruled territory.

"The Palestinian Authority, as the elected leaders of the Palestinian people, need to be a part of this discussion," he said.  "And they're clearly going to play a role in the future of the Palestinian people -- a leading role."

With the death toll rising, Egypt accelerated efforts to broker a ceasefire on Monday.  Anger boiled over in Gaza as the death toll passed 100 and the civilian casualties mounted.  Volleys of Palestinian militant rockets flew into Israel as Israeli drones buzzed endlessly overhead and warplanes streaked through the air to unleash missile strikes.

An Israeli strike on a Gaza City high-rise Monday killed Ramez Harb, one of the top militant leaders of Islamic Jihad, the Palestinian militant group said.

It is also the second high profile commander taken out in the Israeli offensive, which began seven days ago with a missile strike that killed Ahmed Jibari, Hamas' top military commander.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov192012

Phone Call Tells Gazans to Get Out; Missiles Hit Minutes Later

MAJDI FATHI/AFP/Getty Images(JABALIYA, Gaza) -- Anger boiled over in Gaza on Monday as the death toll passed 100 and the civilian casualties mounted. Volleys of Palestinian militant rockets flew into Israel as Israeli drones buzzed endlessly overhead and warplanes streaked through the air to unleash missile strikes.

As Israel comes under fierce criticism for the bombing of a home on Sunday that killed 11, including nine from a single family, it is emphasizing how careful it has been in striking its targets. It has released videos from drone cameras, highlighting conversations between drone pilots that show them waiting until civilians are gone to carry out their strikes. Leaflets have been dropped and Hamas' radio station was taken over by Israel to issue warnings.

And in the Jabaliya refugee camp, a phone call to a four-story building caused a mass evacuation on Sunday. A voice told Fateh Nasser he and everyone in the building had five minutes to get out.

The 40 people inside did not hesitate. And right on schedule, an Israeli missile flattened the building.

Israel says it has been careful about all its strikes, and its missiles have been accurate.

But Nasser and others who were standing outside the demolished building Monday claim they were not aware of any militants in the building.

"This house consists of five families with high number of children," Nasser told ABC News.

Nearby, kids were sweeping up debris on the dusty street and men sat on street corners. Most of the homes and shops were locked up tight. The atmosphere is punctuated with the steady hum of Israeli drones, the whoosh of rockets taking off and heading for Israel, and the blasts of incoming Israeli missiles and artillery from Israeli ships at sea.

During ABC News' interview in Jabaliya, an explosion from an Israeli missile went off close by.

Mohammed Matar, 30, an architect who has a young daughter, said he was furious at the extent of Israel's collateral damage.

"It was like hell. It's war. They bombed everywhere. They say in their news that they're just attacking like kind of Hamas people or something. It's wrong. They're attacking children everywhere," Matar said.

He scoffed at Israel's claim they are firing in self-defense.

"Look, I mean, everyone has the right to defend himself. They are saying that they're defending their selves. Of what? Of rockets. They have no missiles in them. It's an empty rocket. It's just a kind of tube kind of going and doing nothing. But it's our way of defense. We have nothing," Matar said.

"I have only one kid, a little girl, and I want her to live in peace. I want her to live in Palestine. We have the right to defense ourselves. No one wants war, no one....But what kind of peace we need, that is the question," he said.

A Palestinian man at a Gaza hospital Monday was more blunt as dead bodies were brought out for funerals. The bodies included some of the nine members of the Daloo family who died Sunday when the Israeli missile destroyed the building in which they had been.

When asked whether he thought the toll on civilians, particularly children, was too high and Hamas and its allies should stop firing rockets at Israel, he replied that the victims included a woman in her 70s and a 4-year-old child.

"All the Israeli media said that there are fighters inside the house, but we are from the family. We're denying totally that there is a fighter inside the house that was bombarded," he said.

"And we ask all the groups to retaliate for these massacres and we believe now we shouldn't talk about ceasefire at all," he said.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov192012

Israel Combats Cyber Attacks During Gaza Offensive

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(JERUSALEM) -- The Israeli government said Monday that since the beginning of its military operation in Gaza, cyber attackers have launched more than 44 million attempts to disrupt the operation of various Israeli government websites, but were only successful in knocking out one site for a short period.

"One hacking attempt was successful and took down a site for a few minutes," Carmela Avner, the chief information officer at the Finance Ministry, told ABC News. Avner said the website in question belongs to a "small unit of one of the ministries," but declined to comment further.

Israeli Finance Minister Dr. Yuval Steinitz ordered the government CIO unit to operate in emergency mode but said he remains confident in its abilities.

"We are reaping the fruits on the investment in recent years in the development of computerized defense systems, but we have a lot of work in store for us," he told reporters during a visit to the Government Computing Center in Jerusalem.

The prime minister's office, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the president's residence were among the government websites targeted. Israeli government websites are a common target of cyber attacks, Avner said, but the sheer volume this time around indicated a clear escalation during the Gaza operation.

The dramatic spike comes after the loose hacking collective Anonymous announced online that it would be targeting Israeli websites "in retaliation for the mistreating of people in Gaza and other areas."

Anonymous, the same group that reportedly took out the CIA's public website for a few hours in February, claimed it had attacked approximately 10,000 Israeli websites, both government and private.

Avner said most of the attacks on the government websites were designed to overload the site servers with excessive data. One method of doing that, known as a Distributed Denial of Service (DDos) attack, is a fairly rudimentary tactic historically favored by Anonymous.

Tweeting under the hashtag "OpIsrael" after the name it had given to its campaign, Anonymous claimed to have disrupted service on dozens of private Israeli websites, including the website for the Bank of Jerusalem and the local servers for news outlet MSN and search engine Bing. Both MSN and Bing's Israeli home pages appeared to have experienced trouble earlier Monday but were functioning properly as of this report. The Bank of Jerusalem's website's homepage was functioning but its English section was inaccessible.

Anonymous also tweeted a link to what it presented as the personal contact information of more than 3,000 "donors to Israel," including members of the U.S. Congress. Much of the data appeared to be a compilation of publicly available contact information.

As the real-world military operation gained steam last week, Anonymous posted what it dubbed as a "Gaza Care Package," containing information in Arabic and English about how to circumvent Israeli online surveillance by shielding IP addresses and how to set up alternative WiFi access in the event of an Internet shutdown.

Anonymous made the care package apparently in response to what it called Israeli threats to cut off electricity and Internet access in Gaza. That threat was not reported elsewhere and there have been no reports of Internet or power outages in Gaza so far.

"For far too long, Anonymous has stood by with the rest of the world and watched in despair the barbaric, brutal and despicable treatment of the Palestinian people in the so called 'Occupied Territories' by the Israel Defense Force," Anonymous said in its statement last week. "Like so many around the globe, we have felt helpless in the face of such implacable evil. And today's insane attack and threatened invasion of Gaza was more of the same."

Israeli officials said they are acting only to defend Israel from rocket and terrorist attacks by militants in Gaza.

"We will not accept a situation in which Israeli citizens are threatened by the terror of rockets. No country would accept this, Israel will not accept it," Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said last week.

More than 100 Palestinians, including women and children, and three Israelis have been killed since the start of Israel's Operation Pillar of Defense last week, according to international news reports.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov192012

Israeli Air Strike Kills Top Islamic Jihad Commander

MAJDI FATHI/AFP/Getty Images(GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip) -- An Israeli strike on a Gaza City high-rise Monday has killed one of the top militant leaders of Islamic Jihad, the Palestinian militant group said.

The second strike in two days on the downtown Gaza City building that houses the Hamas TV station, Al Aqsa, has killed Ramez Harb, who is a leading figure in the Al Quds Brigades militant wing, according to a text message Islamic Jihad sent to reporters.

It is also the second high profile commander taken out in the Israeli offensive, which began six days ago with a missile strike that killed Ahmed Jibari, Hamas' top military commander.

On Monday, mourners buried the 11 victims of an Israeli air strike on Sunday, the single deadliest incident since the escalation between Hamas and Israel began last Wednesday.  Among the dead were nine members of the Daloo family, killed when an Israeli warplane targeted their home in Gaza City while trying to kill a Hamas rocket maker, whose fate is unknown.

Palestinian deaths climbed to more than 90 on Monday when four more, including two children, were killed in a strike on a sports stadium the Israel Defense Forces said was being used to launch rockets.  Gaza health officials said half of those killed were children, women or elderly men.

With the death toll rising, Egypt accelerated efforts to broker a ceasefire, but so far the two sides are far apart.  Egypt is being supported by Qatar and Turkey in its peacemaking mission and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is scheduled to arrive at the talks later Monday.

Israel carried out 80 air strikes Monday morning, down from previous morning totals.  There were 75 militant rocket launches, the Israeli military said, also a relatively low tally.

The Israel Defense Forces said that since Wednesday, around 1,100 strikes had been carried out in Gaza while militants have launched about 1,000 rockets towards Israel.

Three Israeli civilians died from militant rocket fire in one attack Thursday and dozens have been wounded.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Monday
Nov192012

Rising Palestinian Death Toll Spurs Calls for Ceasefire in Gaza

Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images(GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip) -- Mourners on Monday buried the 11 victims of an Israeli air strike Sunday, the single deadliest incident since the escalation between Hamas and Israel began last Wednesday.

Among the dead were nine members of the Daloo family, killed when an Israeli warplane targeted their home in Gaza City while trying to kill a Hamas rocket maker, whose fate is unknown.

Palestinian deaths climbed to more than 90 on Monday when four more, including two children, were killed in a strike on a sports stadium the Israel Defense Forces said was being used to launch rockets.  Gaza health officials said half of those killed were children, women or elderly men.

Israel carried out 80 air strikes Monday morning, down from previous morning totals.  There were just 16 militant rocket launches, the Israeli military said, also a relatively low tally.  

The Israel Defense Forces said that since Wednesday, when Hamas' top military commander was assassinated by Israel, around 1,100 strikes had been carried out in Gaza, while militants have launched about 1,000 rockets.

Sunday proved to be one the deadliest days of what Israel has called "Operation Pillar of Defense," with at least 23 people reported killed.  Of those, at least 14 were women and children, according to a Gaza health official.  

The Israel Defense Forces told ABC News it was targeting Hamas rocket maker Yehiya Bia, who lives near the Daloo family in a densely populated Gaza neighborhood and has not been accounted for.

Rescue workers worked frantically Monday morning looking for any survivors in the rubble of the attack.

Israel shifted its tactics this weekend from striking rocket arsenals and firing positions to targeting the homes of senior Hamas commanders and the offices of Hamas politicians in Gaza.  Doing so brought the violence into Gaza's most densely populated areas.

Israel also hit two high-rise buildings on Sunday that house the offices of Hamas and international media outlets, injuring at least six journalists.

Meanwhile, militant rockets continued to rain down on Israel Sunday.  More than 100 rockets were fired Sunday, with 76 landing in Israel, according to the Israel Defense Forces.  

The military said that more than 500 rockets have been fired from Gaza into Israel.  More than 300 have been intercepted by Israel's "Iron Dome" defense system.

Three Israeli civilians died from militant rocket fire in one attack Thursday and dozens have been wounded.

The pace of diplomacy has stepped up as civilian casualties in Gaza continue to rise.  An Israeli envoy is in Cairo to talk with Egyptian officials but Hamas sources say no progress has been made.

United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is scheduled to arrive later Monday, and has called for an immediate ceasefire.  Leaders of Qatar, Turkey and Hamas, as well as an Israeli envoy, are working toward a ceasefire proposal.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Nov182012

Obama:`We Are Fully Supportive of Israel’s Right to Defend Itself’

(BANGKOK, Thailand) -- President Obama today fully backed Israel’s right to defend itself and warned that the escalating violence in the Middle East threatens the prospect for a lasting peace process.

Speaking at a joint press conference with Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, Obama called for an end to the firing of missiles into Israel by militants inside Gaza, saying “there is no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on its citizens from outside its borders.”

The president cautioned that any ground offensive could lead to greater Israeli casualties.

“Israel has every right to expect that it does not have missiles fired into its territory,” he said. “If that can be accomplished without a ramping up of military activity in Gaza, that’s preferable. That’s not just preferable for the people in Gaza, it’s also preferable for the Israelis because if Israeli troops are in Gaza they are much more at risk of incurring fatalities or being wounded.”

Obama reiterated America’s unwavering support for Israel. “We are fully supportive of Israel’s right to defend itself from missiles landing on people’s homes and workplaces and potentially killing civilians. And we will continue to support Israel’s right to defend itself,” he said.

The president, who has been in contact with leaders in the region to try and de-escalate the violence, said “if we’re serious about wanting to resolve this situation and create a genuine peace process, it starts with no more missiles being fired into Israel’s territory and that then gives us the space to try and deal with these long-standing conflicts that exist.”

“We’re going to have to see what kind of progress we can make in the next 24, 36, 48 hours, but what I’ve said to [Egyptian] President Morsi and [Turkish] Prime Minister Erdogan is that those who champion the cause of the Palestinians should recognize that if we see a further escalation of the situation in Gaza than the likelihood of us getting back on any kind of peace track that leads to a two state solution is going to be pushed off way into the future,” he said.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Nov162012

US Clarifies Stance on Israel/Hamas Conflict, Egypt’s Role

MASSOUD HOSSAINI/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- State Department spokesperson Victoria Nuland reiterated at Friday’s briefing the United States' position that Israel has the right to defend itself, but that the U.S. also wants to see an end to Mideast violence as soon as possible.

Nuland also stated that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called Egypt’s Foreign Minister for the second  time this week, in response to the Egyptian Prime Minister’s visit to Gaza Friday.

“Prime Minister Kandil was in Gaza today, so it was an opportunity to get an update on that visit and to get a sense from the Egyptians, in the wake of the visit, what further steps any of us can take to help a de-escalation,” said Nuland.

But the prime minister and the Egyptian government have publicly said the visit was to show Egypt’s solidarity with Hamas, a U.S. designated terrorist organization. Kandil said Friday that the world should take action against Israel, characterizing the country as the “aggressors” in the conflict.

Despite the fact that Egypt’s rhetoric reflects the exact opposite opinion of the United States, Nuland insisted that all the parties are on the same page.

“I don't think anybody's happy with the current situation and the loss of innocent life on both sides. So it's a matter of the international community and particularly regional states with influence to do what they can to make clear to Hamas that this is not benefiting the cause of the Palestinian people, and it's certainly not benefiting the cause of regional stability,” said Nuland.

Nuland said that despite his fiery rhetoric, the United States views the prime minister’s visit to Gaza as being positive, and that Egypt continues to play a key role in being able to influence Hamas in order to keep the conflict from growing.

“We are encouraging Egypt to use its influence on Hamas. Egypt made the decision that it would be helpful to send the prime minister to see what he could do. We've been in contact with them before. We've been in contact with them afterwards,” said Nuland who added, “That does not in any way indicate that we endorse the public statements that were made in the context of that visit.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio







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