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Entries in GPS (4)

Monday
Dec172012

Aussie Driver Blames GPS for Wrong-Way Journey

Comstock/Thinkstock(SYDNEY) -- A 37-year-old Australian man was pulled over early Sunday morning in New South Wales after driving more than 13 miles the wrong way on a freeway.

According to the Australian Broadcast Company, the unidentified motorist didn't realize he was going the wrong way, thinking the cars shooting past him in the other direction were just in an opposing lane.

After the driver was stopped, he claimed his GPS led him in the wrong direction. 

Whether the devices don't work correctly in some remote areas Down Under is a growing concern, the Australian Broadcast Company reports.   The Mildura Police Department issued a warning to drivers last week not to rely on the positioning units that rely on online maps.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Mar162012

GPS Disaster: Japanese Tourists Drive Straight into the Pacific  

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(TOKYO) -- Three Japanese tourists in Australia found themselves in an embarrassing situation after their GPS navigation system lured them down the wrong path. Three students from Tokyo set out to drive to North Stradbroke Island on the Australian coast Thursday morning, and mapped out their path on their GPS system.

The road looked clear, at low tide — but the map forgot to show the nine miles of water and mud between the island and the mainland.

As the three drove their rented Hyundai Getz into Moreton Bay, they found the GPS device guiding them from a gravel road into thick mud.  They tried to get back to solid ground, but as the tide rose they were forced to abandon their car.  Passengers on passing ferries watched in amazement.

“It told us we could drive down there,” Yuzu Noda, 21, told the local Bayside Bulletin. “It kept saying it would navigate us to a road. We got stuck...there’s lots of mud.”

Noda and her friends made it about 50 yards offshore before they realized they were stranded. A tow truck driver eventually gave them a lift back to the mainland. The students decided not to have the car repaired because of the damage. The car was insured, though Noda will still have to pay about $1,500 that was not covered.

The students will fly back home to Tokyo this weekend, but they said they plan to try a trip to the island again sometime in the future.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Mar092011

North Korea Disrupting Military Maneuvers by Jamming GPS

South Korean soldiers stand guard at a west sea checkpoint on Yeonpyeong Island, South Korea. Getty Images(SEOUL, South Korea) -- North Korea appears to be protesting the joint U.S. and South Korean military maneuvers by jamming Global Positioning Devices in the south, which is a nuisance for cell phone and computers users -- but is a hint of the looming menace for the military.

Since March 4, Pyongyang has been trying to disrupt GPS receivers critical to South Korean military communications apparently in protest of the ongoing joint military training exercises between South Korean and U.S. forces.  Strong jamming signals were sent intermittently every five to 10 minutes.

The scope of the damage has been minimal, putting some mobile phones and certain military equipment that use GPS signals on the fritz.

Large metropolitan areas including parts of Seoul, Incheon, and Paju have been affected by the jamming, but "the situation is getting wrapped up, no severe damage has been reported for the last two days," Kyoungwoo Lee, deputy director of Korea Communications Commission, said.

The jamming, however, has raised questions about whether the Korean peninsula is bracing for new electronic warfare.

The North is believed to be nearing completion of an electromagnetic pulse bomb that, if exploded 25 miles above ground would cause irreversible damage to electrical and electronic devices such as mobile phones, computers, radio, and radar, experts say.

"We assume they are at a considerably substantial level of development," Park Chang-kyu of the Agency for Defense Development said at a briefing to the parliament Monday.

Park confirmed that South Korea has also developed an advanced electronic device that can be deployed in times of war.

The current attempts to interfere with GPS transmissions are coming from atop a modified truck-mounted Russian device.  Pyongyang reportedly imported the GPS jamming system from Russia in early 2000 and has since developed two modified versions.´╗┐

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jan102011

Israeli Vulture Spy Declared Innocent by Saudi Arabia

Picture Of A Vulture Unrelated To The One Caught in Saudi Arabia. Photo Courtesy - Getty Images(RIYADH, Saudi Arabia) -- A vulture that was caught in Saudi Arabia last week and accused of spying for Israel's Mossad is to be released, a Saudi official said.

Prince Bandar bin Saud Al Saud scoffed at the claims, as did much of the world when news came last week that the vulture tagged with a GPS tracker by Tel Aviv University had been caught in the kingdom and accused by the media and locals of partaking in a "Zionist plot."

"These systems are fitted to birds and animals, including marine animals. Most countries use these systems, including Saudi Arabia," Saud told Saudi media on Sunday, according to Emirates 24/7. "We have taken delivery of this bird, but we will set it free again after we [have] verified its systems."

Saud insisted he wasn't defending Israel, but called for calm.

"Some of the Saudi journalists rushed in carrying the news of this bird for the sake of getting a scoop without checking the information," he said. "They should have asked the competent authorities about the bird before publishing such news."

The bird, identified as a Griffon vulture tagged R65, was called a bald eagle by Saud.

After the bird had been captured, Israeli officials were quick to insist that it was part of a program studying migratory patterns.

"The device does nothing more than receive and store basic data about the bird's whereabouts, and about his altitude and speed," an official at Israel's Park and Nature Authority told the Maariv newspaper.

Israel is the subject of feverish conspiracy theories across the Arab world. In December, an Egyptian governor floated the possibility of the Mossad of being behind a string of shark attacks at an Egyptian resort.

The Jerusalem Post reported Monday that the director of the Society for the Protection of Nature, Dan Alon, is "filled with joy to hear of the bird's release."

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio´╗┐







ABC News Radio