SEARCH

Entries in Joran Van Der Sloot (12)

Monday
Oct082012

Did Joran Van Der Sloot Impregnate a Woman from Jail?

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(MEXICO CITY) -- The lawyer representing Joran van der Sloot shot down reports Monday that the Dutch playboy who is suspected of killing Natalee Holloway had impregnated a woman during a conjugal visit in his Peruvian prison.

Van der Sloot told Dutch newspaper, De Telegraaf, that a woman identified only as "Leidi" was pregnant with his child.

"A test has proved" the pregnancy, he told the paper.

But van der Sloot's lawyer, Maximo Altez, told ABC News the reports are not true and the Peruvian woman, whose real name he said is Carol Figueroa Uceda, told him she was not pregnant.

Whether the woman is pregnant or not, it came as a surprise to many that van der Sloot, convicted of killing a Peruvian woman and suspected of killing American Natalee Holloway, is granted conjugal visits in his prison.

Altez blamed the pregnancy rumors on his own client and said De Telegraaf had never contacted the lawyer directly.

Uceda, however, had been authorized to visit van der Sloot for conjugal visits, he said. Altez said he originally utilized the woman, who had access to the prison, to help him run errands there. Later, he helped make arrangements to grant her permission for conjugal visits with van der Sloot.

In June 2011, Uceda was also rumored to have become pregnant with van der Sloot's child.

Van der Sloot is serving a 28-year sentence in Peru for the murder of Stefany Flores. He was convicted of killing Flores in a Lima hotel in 2010, after meeting the young woman in a casino. Van der Sloot told police he killed her after she learned about his association to Holloway's disappearance.

Van der Sloot was never formally charged with the murder of Holloway, an American high school student who went missing in Aruba in 2005. He is currently wanted in the U.S. on charges that he attempted to extort Holloway's parents, promising to tell them where her body was in exchange for money.

Both Altez and American lawyers said van der Sloot could not evade extradition to the U.S., by fathering a Peruvian child or marrying a Peruvian woman. Peru says it will extradite van der Sloot after he has served his prison term there.

Copryright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Jul052012

Joran Van Der Sloot Blames Lawyer for Long Prison Sentence

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(LIMA, Peru) -- In two letters, Joran van der Sloot blamed his lawyers for his nearly three-decade prison sentence, while he reiterated he had nothing to do with the 2005 disappearance of Natalee Holloway and begged for forgiveness for the murder of Stephany Flores.

Van der Sloot, 24, is serving 28 years in a Peruvian jail for the murder and robbery of Flores, a 21-year-old business student whose body was found in a Lima hotel room in May 2010 -- five years after the disappearance of Holloway.

"I ask God every day that Stephany's parents can find it in their heart to forgive me," he reportedly wrote in the letters released by his attorney.

Van der Sloot, a Dutch citizen who spent the majority of his adolescence in Caribbean island of Aruba, is the main suspect in the 2005 disappearance of Holloway, an 18-year-old from Mountain Brook, Ala., who was last seen leaving an Oranjestad nightclub with van der Sloot, then 17, while she was on a class graduation trip to the island.

He was arrested but has never been charged with a crime relating to her disappearance.

The letters, in which he refers to himself as a "psychological mess," were said to have been written in June and released this week by van der Sloot's attorney, Max Altez.  In the letter, he asserts that he has "nothing to do with" Holloway's disappearance, while blaming poor legal representation for his long prison sentence.  He says that a previous lawyer told him if he pled guilty he would only be jailed for 15 years.

"My rights have been constantly abused," van der Sloot reportedly wrote.  "After bad legal advice in which my lawyer promised me I would receive 15 years if I plead guilty, I did....I have a history of psychological problems which were never taken into consideration."

The Peruvian Supreme Court last month ruled that van der Sloot can be extradited to the U.S. to face charges that he extorted $25,000 from Holloway's mother, allegedly telling her that he could give her information that would lead to her daughter's body.

On Sept. 6, 2010, Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf reported that van der Sloot admitted to the extortion, saying, "I wanted to get back at Natalee's family.  Her parents have been making my life tough for five years."

Van der Sloot confessed to the murder of Flores in January.  He said that Flores had been using his laptop without his permission and discovered information linking him to Holloway's disappearance.  He is now appealing the 28-year sentence.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May082012

Joran Van Der Sloot’s Lawyer Says US Extradition Inevitable

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(LIMA, Peru) -- The extradition of Joran van der Sloot to the U.S. on charges of wire fraud and extortion in connection with the death of Natalee Holloway will likely take place this summer, his lawyer told ABC News Tuesday.

“The power of the United States will assure that Joran has to face a U.S. judge and I think the extradition will happen probably in two or three months,” Maximo Altez said in an exclusive interview with ABC News.

Altez spoke to ABC News after van der Sloot appeared in a jailhouse courtroom at Piedras Gordas prison, about two hours north of Lima.

Peruvian Judge Zenaida Vilca heard arguments by U.S. Justice Department officials pushing for the extradition while Altez opposed the move on grounds his client could not receive a fair trial in a U.S. court.

The Dutch national is currently serving a 28-year sentence for the murder of Stephany Flores, a Peruvian woman whom van der Sloot admitted to strangling in his Lima hotel room two years ago.

He is also the main suspect in the disappearance of Holloway in 2005 on the Caribbean island of Aruba, where van der Sloot had lived most of his life.

Van der Sloot, appearing nervous and thinner than in previous appearances, was marched by prison officials to the courtroom, handcuffed and refusing to answer questions posed by nearby reporters.

The maximum-security jail is in a sparsely populated area of rolling desert-like hills. On one of the mountains overlooking the facility is the slogan "Cristo Vive" (Christ Lives) in huge white block letters and below are the tents of some very poor squatters.

Altez spoke with ABC News after the court appearance and said van der Sloot was “very upset with the prospect of being extradited to the U.S. I haven’t seen Joran so down, so depressed since I took on his defense almost two years ago.”

The extortion and wire fraud charges relate to payments allegedly made to van der Sloot by the Holloway family for information on the whereabouts of their daughter’s body.

In court U.S. legal officials argued that there is evidence that will show that van der Sloot arranged for and accepted those payments. Altez says that van der Sloot was lured into taking those payments and that it wasn’t on his client’s initiative.

Although the judge and other Peruvian legal authorities claim van der Sloot will have to return to Peru to finish out his 28-year sentence, Altez thinks differently.

“Once he’s in the U.S. there are no guarantees that he would not be charged with Holloway’s murder although no such evidence exists,” he said.

The next step involves the judge sending her decision to Peru’s Supreme Court, expected within the next week to 10 days, and the high court then giving its stamp of approval to the extradition. At that point, only government ministers or the president can stop the process, which is highly unlikely, according to most observers.

“It’s not in our interest that Joran be judged in the U.S. because he is despised there. You could not find an impartial jury to try him,” said Altez, who said he will try to stop the extradition “by all legal means possible.”

“There’s not much you can do when you’re up against the most powerful country in the world,” he added.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan132012

Joran Van Der Sloot Sentenced to 28 Years in Prison

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(LIMA, Peru) -- Joran van der Sloot was sentenced Friday to 28 years in a Peruvian prison for strangling a woman there, and American officials are now expected to bring him to Alabama to face charges in connection with the disappearance of American teenager Natalee Holloway.

The attorney for Holloway's mother, John Q. Kelly, said after Friday's sentencing that he hopes van der Sloot will be extradited to the U.S. within "a couple of months."

Van der Sloot is charged with extorting $25,000 from Holloway's grieving mother Beth Holloway in exchange for information about the location of Natalee's body. After receiving the money, van der Sloot admitted lying about where the girl's body was buried.

"We anticipate that U.S. authorities will move quickly to bring him to Alabama to face pending federal charges and to answer for his past conduct in Aruba," Kelly had said prior to the sentencing.

video platform video management video solutions video player

The U.S. District Attorney in Birmingham, where the case against van der Sloot will be prosecuted, did not immediately return calls for comment. They had previously told ABC News that they had made arrangements with Interpol to have van der Sloot extradited to the U.S.

Any sentence he might receive in the U.S. would be served in conjunction with the 28 years he was sentenced in Peru, Kelly said.

Van der Sloot, 24, looked slovenly and confused during his long court sentencing in a Lima courtroom Friday and was visibly angry when the judge ordered him to spend the next 28 years in prison. He appeared to be cursing out loud. The court also ordered him to pay $75,000 in reparations.

Under Peru's laws, however, van der Sloot could get out after serving half of his sentence.

Van der Sloot pleaded guilty Wednesday to strangling Stephany Flores, a 21-year-old Peruvian businesswoman whom he killed on May 31, 2010, exactly five years after Holloway disappeared.

Flores, the 21-year-old daughter of a wealthy and influential Peruvian businessman and former star race car driver, was found strangled in van der Sloot's hotel room in 2010. The two had reportedly met at a Lima casino.

Van der Sloot's lawyer told the court earlier in the hearing that his client had killed Flores because of the psychological trauma of being accused in the Holloway case.

Prosecutors had asked for a 30 year sentence for first-degree murder and theft in Flores' case. Van der Sloot, who lived in Aruba, fled Peru, but was arrested three days later in Chile.

He reportedly claimed in a confession shortly after the slaying that he'd killed Flores because she found information linking him to Holloway on his computer.

Van der Sloot had twice been arrested for the disappearance of Holloway, a 19-year-old from Alabama who vanished during a celebratory trip to Aruba with her senior class in May 2005.

Van der Sloot maintained that he had left her on a beach, drunk. That's the last anyone has seen of her.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan132012

Joran Van Der Sloot to Be Sentenced in 2010 Peru Murder

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(LIMA, Peru) -- Joran van der Sloot, the Dutch national long believed to be responsible for the 2005 disappearance of Alabama teen Natalee Holloway, will be sentenced on Friday after pleading guilty to the murder of a Peruvian woman he had met in a Lima hotel five years to the day Holloway vanished.

The 24-year-old faces up to 30 years in prison for the death of 21-year-old Stephany Flores, although it's expected he'll get less time for the homicide after confessing to it on Wednesday.

Flores, the daughter of a wealthy and influential Peruvian businessman, was found strangled in van der Sloot’s hotel room on May 31, 2010.  The two had reportedly met at a Lima casino.

Van der Sloot reportedly claimed in a confession shortly after the slaying that he’d killed Flores because she found information linking him to Holloway on his computer.

Van der Sloot, a former Aruba resident, was the last person seen with the 18-year-old Holloway, who was on a high school trip in Aruba, before she vanished.  No body has even been found despite countless searches and probes by both Aruban authorities and private investigators hired by Holloway's family.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Jan112012

Joran Van Der Sloot Pleads Guilty to 2010 Peru Murder

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(LIMA, Peru) -- Joran van der Sloot, the prime suspect in the disappearance of American teen Natalee Holloway, pleaded guilty Wednesday to the 2010 murder of Stephany Flores in Peru.

Van der Sloot faced up to 30 years in jail if convicted at a trial. It’s not clear how much time he will get as a result of his confession. His hearing was suspended until Friday when he will be sentenced.

Flores, the 21-year-old daughter of a wealthy and influential Peruvian businessman, was found strangled in van der Sloot’s hotel room on May 31, 2010. The two had reportedly met at a Lima casino.

The Dutch national who lived in Aruba fled Peru but was arrested three days later in Chile, which sent him back to Peru.

Van der Sloot reportedly claimed in a confession shortly after the slaying that he’d killed Flores because she found information linking him to Holloway on his computer.

video platform video management video solutions video player

Van der Sloot, 25, appeared in a Lima court last Friday and agreed to make a confession but then asked the court for more time to consider his options.

Van der Sloot had twice previously been arrested for the disappearance of Holloway, a 19-year-old from Alabama who vanished during a celebratory trip to Aruba with her senior class in May 2005.

Van der Sloot maintained that he’d left her on a beach, drunk. That’s the last anyone has seen of her.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan062012

Natalee Holloway’s Suspected Killer Seeks Deal in Peru

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(LIMA, Peru) -- Joran van der Sloot, accused of murder in Peru and the prime suspect in the disappearance of American teen Natalee Holloway in Aruba, appears to be considering a plea deal that could get him out of prison in a few years.

Van der Sloot appeared in a packed jailhouse court in Lima, Peru, Friday and agreed to make a confession before asking the court for more time to consider his options. The court agreed to another hearing next Wednesday.

Van der Sloot, 24, is charged in Peru with the murder of Stephany Flores on May 30, 2010. Conviction of a first degree murder charge would mean a possible 30 year sentence.

Flores, the daughter of a wealthy and influential Peruvian businessman, was found strangled in van der Sloot’s hotel room on May 31, 2010.

Friday’s hourlong courtroom session appeared to set up a situation where van der Sloot will plead guilty by reason of temporary insanity, which, under Peruvian law, carries a sentence of three to five years.

If he pleads guilty to temporary insanity and the court accepts that plea, he could be set free, according to statements his lawyers have made to ABC News.

They state that Peru has a two-for-one stipulation in its judicial system, meaning a prisoner’s time spent in jail awaiting trial is computed doubly. Van der Sloot has completed more than three years of jail time -- the minimum of the three- to five-year term if found guilty.

If given the maximum sentence of five years, he would finish that term in less than two years.

The Dutch national who lived in Aruba fled Peru and was arrested three days later in Chile, which sent him back to Peru.

Friday’s hearing took place at the Lurigancho prison about a mile and a half from his jail cell in Miguel Castro Castro prison. Lurigancho is considered one of the worst prisons in the world by human rights groups, with about 11,000 inmates in a space for little more than 2,000.

Castro Castro is considered a “country club” jail where prisoners pay their way in to not have to go to Lurigancho. Van der Sloot has a small room with an uncomfortable-looking bed and a nearby toilet. For a while he had special privileges that included a PlayStation, a computer, two cell phones and reportedly prostitutes and drugs. That has changed under a new prison administration.

Van der Sloot had twice previously been arrested for the disappearance of Holloway, a 19-year-old from Alabama who vanished during a celebratory trip to Aruba with her senior class in May 2005. Van der Sloot maintained that he’d left her on a beach, drunk. That’s the last anyone has seen of her.

If van der Sloot does get out of the Peruvian prison, he will likely be sought by the FBI which has accused him of fraud and extortion, demanding $25,000 from Holloway’s mother Beth Twitty. In exchange he promised to tell her where her daughter’s body was. After Twitty paid the money, van der Sloot pointed out a new house and said her body was encased in the foundation, a claim he later admitted was a lie.

Beth Twitty declined to comment on the proceedings Friday.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Rado

Wednesday
Sep142011

Natalee Holloway's Dad Wants Her Declared Legally Dead

Joran van der Sloot, the man suspected of killing Natalee Holloway. Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(ORANJESTAD, Aruba) -- Natalee Holloway's father has served papers on her mother seeking to have the teenager, who disappeared during a senior class trip to Aruba in 2005, declared legally dead.

Court papers obtained by ABC News indicate that on April 19, 2011, Dave Holloway signed papers seeking a "petition for presumption of death for persons missing for more than five years."  Natalee Holloway vanished on May 30, 2005, more than six years ago, at age 17.

The request was actually filed in probate court on June 21.  The court documents state that a hearing on the father's request is scheduled for Sept. 23.

The missing teen's mother, Beth Holloway, spoke briefly to ABC News and said she does not intend to agree to have her daughter declared legally dead.

"No, I want to get to the bottom of what's going on from Dave," she said.

Dave Holloway could not immediately be reached for comment.

Beth Holloway has been relentless in her efforts to find out what happened to her daughter, even slipping into a Peruvian prison to confront Joran van der Sloot, the Aruban man suspected of killing Natalee.

At one point, she agreed to a sting, seemingly complying with van der Sloot's demand for cash in exchange for information about the location of her daughter's body.  The transaction was monitored by Aruban authorities, but van der Sloot left the island before the FBI filed extortion charges.

Before van der Sloot could be arrested on extortion, he was arrested in Peru and charged with killing a woman, Stephany Flores Ramirez, on May 30, 2010, the fifth anniversary of Natalee's disappearance.  He has been in a Peruvian prison since.

Natalee Holloway was on the last day of a graduation trip to Aruba with her senior class at Mountain Brook High School in Alabama when she did not return to her hotel.  She was last seen in a car with several people that included van der Sloot.

Extensive searches were carried out on the island and surrounding waters, often with Beth Holloway pleading publicly for someone to come forward and hectoring officials to keep on searching.  The case was closed by Aruba police in 2007, but reopened in 2008 after van der Sloot was caught on video telling someone that he disposed of her body.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Tuesday
May312011

Legal Rep for Joran Van Der Sloot Resigns

Sebastian Silva/AFP/Getty Images(LIMA, Peru) -- Joran van deer Sloot, accused of murder in the death of Stephany Flores in Peru, has lost his legal counsel.  His attorney Maximo Altez resigned Tuesday, according to Dutch media reports.

Dutch News reports that Altez had grown tired of having disputes with Van der Sloot over money and his defense strategy.  Altez also argued with American lawyers representing his client, who said last week that Van der Sloot was ready to be extradited to the U.S. even though Peru had no extradition treaty with the U.S.

Altez told the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf that he is prepared to provide legal counsel to Van der Sloot regarding a separate case which concerns the violation of his human rights after his arrest.

Van deer Sloot has also been implicated in the disappearance of Natalee Holloway, an American teenager who went missing during a high school trip to Aruba nearly six years ago.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

Monday
Mar072011

Report: Joran van der Sloot to Plead Guilty to Manslaughter

Darrin Klimek/Thinkstock(LIMA, Peru) -- Joran van der Sloot, a 23-year-old Dutch playboy accused of murdering a Peruvian woman following a night of drinking and gambling, will plead guilty of involuntary manslaughter, his lawyer said Monday.

Van der Sloot, the primary suspect in the 2005 disappearance of American teenager Natalee Holloway in Aruba, plans to use a "fit of rage" defense in his upcoming trial for the murder of Peruvian Stephany Flores, his lawyer Maximo Altez said Monday.

Altez, speaking on the Peruvian television show Domingo Al Día, said van der Sloot had no premeditated plan to kill Flores. The two got into an argument after Flores had looked at his laptop, the lawyer said.

"They started pushing each other and that is why it happened," Altez said.

Under Peruvian law, manslaughter in a fit of rage carries a prison sentence of between three and five years, and Altez said his client could be free in 20 months. Van der Sloot could face a sentence of 15 to 35 years if he is convicted of murder.

Soon after his June 2010 arrest, van der Sloot confessed to killing Flores in his hotel room, telling authorities that he became enraged when the woman looked him up online and learned of his alleged involvement in the Holloway affair.

"She hit me in the head. I lost control of my actions. I didn't know what I was doing. I remember what I was doing, but not the motive. It was an impulsive act after receiving a blow to the head," van der Sloot said in a signed confession to police last year.

The "fit of rage" defense is typically reserved for crimes of passion, such as when a husband catches his wife in the act of committing adultery.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio