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Entries in Loch Ness Monster (3)

Wednesday
Aug152012

Scottish Sailor Claims to Have Best Picture Yet of Loch Ness Monster

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Legend has it that the Loch Ness monster was first sighted in the sixth century by an Irish monk while preaching by the lake.  Now, a Scottish sailor who has spent the last 26 years of his life searching for the elusive creature, says he has the best picture yet of “Nessie.”

George Edwards takes his boat, “Nessie Hunter,” out onto Loch Ness nearly every day, often with tourists who hope to see the creature for themselves.  Early one morning in November of last year, Edwards was turning his ship back to shore after spending the morning searching for an old steam engine on the lake floor, when he saw something else.

“I saw something out of the corner of my eye, and immediately grabbed my camera,” Edwards told ABC News.  “I happened to get a good picture of one of them.”

The typical “media Nessie,” as Edwards calls it, depicts the creature with three humps sticking out of the water and a long neck with a head like a horse, but Edwards says that’s probably not what Nessie looks like.

The picture Edwards took shows what he says is the back of one of the Loch Ness monsters.

“In my opinion, it probably looks kind of like a manatee, but not a mammal,” Edwards told ABC.  “When people see three humps, they’re probably just seeing three separate monsters.”

While many people think of the Loch Ness monster as a single creature, Edwards maintains that can’t be true.

“It was first seen in 565 AD,” Edwards said.  “Nothing can live that long.  It’s more likely that there are a number of monsters, offspring of the original.”

Edwards has a lot of theories about the Loch Ness monster, which he first became fascinated with when he was a 13-year-old boy and his father would take him fishing at the massive lake.  He says he was a skeptic at first, but decades on Loch Ness have turned him into an ardent believer.

“I grew up with the legend, like the boogeyman, or Big Foot in your part of the world, and most people start out thinking it’s a myth,” Edwards said.  “But Loch Ness is so deep and dark and mysterious, when you start hearing more and more stories, you start believing more.”

The main argument Edwards says he hears from skeptics is that the lake has been searched, and nothing has ever been found proving the existence of a Loch Ness monster.

“That’s a silly reason to not believe though, because those expeditions can’t prove anything one way or the other,” Edwards told ABC.  “It’s a massive body of water, deep and dark, and we simply don’t have the technology to really do that kind of search.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Thursday
Feb092012

Is This Iceland’s Loch Ness Monster?

Alexander Schnurer/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Does the fabled Loch Ness monster of Iceland really exist? Scientists are skeptical, but a new video alleging to have captured images of the monster has gone viral online, raising the debate over its existence anew.

The video was shot Feb. 2 by local resident Hjortur Kjerulf and then posted on the website of Icelandic broadcaster RUV.  The footage shows what looks like a creature slithering through the icy waters of the Jökulsá í Fljótsdal river in east Iceland.

The alleged monster, known as Lagarfljótsormurinn, Iceland’s version of Scotland’s Loch Ness Monster, has been a part of Icelandic folklore since 1345.

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The story goes that the mythical creature has lived in the 25-mile long and 376-feet deep Lagarfljót lake ever since a young girl who wanted her ring to grow placed the ring around a tiny worm. When she returned, the worm had grown and, frightened by it, she hurled the worm into the river where it grew into the now legendary Iceland Loch Ness monster.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Wednesday
Nov092011

Canada’s Loch Ness Monster Caught on Tape?

Could picturesque Lake Okanagan be home to the mysterious monster known as Ogopogo? iStockphoto/Thinkstock(LAKE OKANAGAN, British Columbia) -- A possible sighting of Canada’s version of the Loch Ness monster at a lake in British Columbia has stirred up the legend of the sea creature long rumored to reside there.

A man visiting British Columbia’s Lake Okanagan claims he filmed video of what could only be the elusive monster, known to locals as Ogopogo. The 30-second video shows two long ripples in the water in a seemingly deserted area of the lake.

“It was not going with the waves,” Richard Huls, who captured the scene on camera during a visit to a local winery, told the Vancouver Sun. “It was not a wave, obviously, just a darker color. The size and the fact that they were not parallel with the waves made me think it had to be something else.”

Ogopogo is the Canadian version of Scotland’s famous Loch Ness monster. The first recorded sighting of the alleged creature in Loch Ness was nearly 1,500 years ago when a giant beast is said to have leaped out of a lake near Inverness, Scotland, to eat a local farmer. Since then, the legend has taken on a life of its own through first-person accounts of those who claim to have seen it and in public imagination.

As with Loch Ness, the Ogopogo phenomenon dates back hundreds of years and is believed to have its origins in native Canadian Indian folklore with a creature called N’ha-a-itk. The locals would not cross the area of the lake where they thought the monster resided without an offering to feed the monster if attacked.

Ogopogo is most commonly described as a 40- to 50-foot-long sea serpent. There have reportedly been thousands of sightings of the monster through the years, including a marathon swimmer in 2000 who claimed he saw two large creatures in Ogopogo’s likeness swimming with him at times. The lake has been searched and no concrete evidence of the monster has turned up. Still, the legend of the lake monster lives on.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio

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