SEARCH

Entries in Nelson Mandela (39)

Saturday
Jul132013

Nelson Mandela Remains in Critical Condition

Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- Nelson Mandela remains in a South African hospital where he has been listed in "critical but stable" condition with a lung infection for the past month.

On Friday, Mandela's wife, Graca Machel, said that the 94-year-old is responding to treatment. She added that she is less anxious about his condition.

Mandela's ex-wife Winnie Mandela visited the former South African president in the hospital on Friday, along with his granddaughters and one of his daughters. His 95th birthday is on Thursday.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Jun302013

Obama Visits Mandela’s Robben Island Cell

iStockphoto(CAPE TOWN, South Africa) -- On Sunday, with the world’s eyes on the ailing Nelson Mandela, President Obama walked in the footsteps of the man he’s called his personal hero.

Touring the prison on Robben Island, Obama stood alone in the stark “7B” cell where Mandela was imprisoned for 18 of his 27 years in captivity and stared out at the blue sky through the barred window.
Obama visited the island before, in 2006 when he was a senator, but Sunday he returned for the first time as president and brought along his family.

“For me to be able to bring my daughters there and teach them the history of that place and this country, and help them to understand not only how those lessons apply to their own lives but also to their responsibilities in the future as citizens of the world, that’s a great privilege and a great honor,” Obama said Saturday.

The first family viewed the quarry where Mandela and his fellow prisoners were forced to do grueling labor, endlessly breaking large stones into smaller ones, and the courtyard provided for their recreation. They walked through the tiny, barren cells, which were barely wide enough for the prisoners to lie down.
The president, first lady, daughters Sasha and Malia, first grandmother Marian Robinson and the president’s niece Leslie Robinson were guided through the prison by a former inmate. Like Mandela, Ahmed Kathrada was imprisoned for 18 years for his anti-apartheid activities.

The president was overheard chiming in with his own history lessons.

“One thing you guys might not be aware of is that the idea of political nonviolence first took root here in South Africa because Mahatma Gandhi was a lawyer here in South Africa. Here is where he did his first political [activism]. When he went back to India the principles ultimately led to Indian independence, and what Gandhi did inspired Martin Luther King,” he told his family.

Before departing, the president and first lady signed the visitor log.

“On behalf of our family we’re deeply humbled to stand where men of such courage faced down injustice and refused to yield. The world is grateful for the heroes of Robben Island, who remind us that no shackles or cells can match the strength of the human spirit,” the president wrote.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Jun302013

Obama Toasts Mandela, ‘The Master of His Fate’

JUDA NGWENYA/AFP/Getty Images(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- Speaking at an official dinner in Pretoria Saturday night, President Obama offered a moving toast to Nelson Mandela, “a man who has always been the master of his fate, who taught us that we could be the master of ours.”

“Our minds and our hearts are not fully here because a piece of us, a piece of our heart is with a man and a family not far from here,” Obama said, in brief remarks at the formal dinner hosted by President Zuma, not far from where the ailing 94-year-old civil rights icon remains in the hospital.

Obama recited the words Mandela often turned to in his cell in Robben Island prison, “a poem he read to the others in their darkest moments to give them strength,” he said.

He then read aloud William Ernest Henley’s Invictus:

“Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds and shall find me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.”

Raising a glass, Obama proposed a toast “to a man who has always been the master of his fate, who taught us that we could be the master of ours.”

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jun292013

Obama Compares Nelson Mandela to George Washington

WALTER DHLADHLA/AFP/Getty Image(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- Although President Obama will not get a chance to see Nelson Mandela on his trip to South Africa, he is using his historic visit to pay tribute to the man he calls a hero to the world and will meet with the Mandela family.

At a joint press conference with South African President Jacob Zuma Saturday morning, President Obama spoke extensively about Mandela's legacy.

"Our thoughts and those of Americans and people all around the world are with Nelson Mandela and his family and all of South Africans," Obama said. "The struggle here for freedom, Madiba's moral courage, this country's historic transition to a free nation has been a personal inspiration to me, an inspiration to the world, and it continues to be."

Obama's two-day visit to South Africa -- and his entire week-long visit to the continent -- has been dominated by the Mandela vigil, giving Obama to speak about what Mandela means to Africa and the rest of the world.

"The outpouring of love that we've seen in recent days shows that the triumph of Mandela and this nation speaks to something very deep in the human spirit," Obama said. "That's what Mandela represents, that's what South Africa can represent to the world and what brought me back here."
Later, when asked about his policy toward Africa, Obama again returned to Mandela.

"Mandela shows what was possible when a priority is placed on human dignity, respect for law, that all people are treated equally," Obama said.

"And what Nelson Mandela also stood for is that the well-being of the country is more important than the interests of any one person," Obama continued. "George Washington is admired because after two terms he said enough, I'm going back to being a citizen. There were no term limits, but he said I'm a citizen. I served my time. And it's time for the next person, because that's what democracy is about. And Mandela similarly was able to recognize that, despite how revered he was, that part of this transition process was greater than one person."

At the joint press conference, President Zuma offered an update on Mandela's health -- saying there has been no change in his health but that he hopes he will be able to leave the hospital soon.

"The position of former president Mandela, he remains critical but stable," Zuma said. "Nothing has changed so far. We are hoping that he is going to improve. With all the prayers and good wishes that have been made, everyone is wishing Mandela well. The doctors who are tending to him are doing everything -- these are excellent doctors. We hope that very soon, he will be out of hospital."

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jun292013

Obama to Meet With Mandela Family

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- President Obama will not visit the hospital to meet with ailing civil rights icon Nelson Mandela, the White House announced Saturday.

“Out of deference to Nelson Mandela’s peace and comfort and the family’s wishes, [the president and first lady] will not be visiting the hospital,” the White House said.

The president will, however, meet privately with members of the Mandela family “to offer their thoughts and prayers at this difficult time.”

The president downplayed expectations Friday that he would meet face-to-face with Mandela during his stay in South Africa.

“I don’t need a photo-op,” the president told reporters. “The last thing I want to do is to be in any way obtrusive at a time when the family is concerned about Nelson Mandela’s condition.”

Obama and Mandela have met only once in person, during a spontaneous meeting in Washington in 2005, when Obama was just a junior Senator.

It was widely speculated that Obama would meet with Mandela for the first time as president during his weeklong trip to Africa, in what would have been a deeply symbolic face-to-face encounter.

The 94-year-old former president was admitted to the hospital three weeks ago for a chronic lung infection.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Monday
Jun242013

Nelson Mandela in Critical Condition

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- Nelson Mandela, the former president of South Africa, took a turn for the worse and was in critical condition on Sunday in his battle with a lung infection, according to a statement from the South African president's office.

"The doctors are doing everything possible to get his condition to improve and are ensuring that Madiba is well-looked after and is comfortable. He is in good hands," South African Jacob Zuma said, using Mandela's tribal nickname.

Mandela had been listed in "serious but stable condition" for since he entered the hospital June 8.

The 94-year-old Nobel Peace prize winner's medical team informed the president's office that Mandela's condition become critical over the past 24 hours, according to the statement.

Zuma reiterated Sunday that Mandela's health was not compromised when the ambulance that was bringing him to the hospital in June 8 broke down.

"There were seven doctors in the convoy who were in full control of the situation throughout the period. He had expert medical care," Zuma said. "The fully equipped military ICU ambulance had a full complement of specialist medical staff including intensive care specialists and ICU nurses. The doctors also dismissed the media reports that Madiba suffered cardiac arrest. There is no truth at all in that report."

Mandela was forced to wait for a second ambulance after the first one broke down, the South African government admitted Saturday.

"When the ambulance experienced engine problems it was decided that it would be best to transfer to another military ambulance which itself was accompanied for the rest of the journey by a civilian ambulance," the president's office said Saturday.

Mandela was rushed to the hospital in the early morning hours of June 8, after his health deteriorated rapidly from a recurring lung infection.

News of Mandela's turn for the worse comes after a week in which there were several statement's that his health was improving.

Former South African president Thabo Mbeki suggested Saturday that Mandela was getting better.

After speaking to Mandela's doctors, Mbeki told a South African radio station, "Nelson Mandela is improving in terms of his health. I don't think anyone should entertain some sort of wrong notion that Nelson Mandela is about to die tomorrow. He's not going to."

Earlier this week, Mandela's daughter Zenani Mandela-Dlamini told a crowd of reporters outside Mediclinic Heart Hospital her father "is doing very well." President Jacob Zuma has also said publicly Mandela's health is "improving."

In April, Mandela spent 18 days in the hospital due to a lung infection and was treated for gall stones in December 2012.

Mandela served as the first black president of South Africa from 1994 to 1999.

In 1993, he received a Nobel Peace Prize for his work in ending apartheid through non-violent means.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jun222013

Nelson Mandela's Ambulance Broke Down on the Way to Hospital

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images(JOHANNESBURG) -- The ambulance carrying Nelson Mandela to the hospital two weeks ago broke down, according to the South African government and the 94-year-old was forced to wait for a second ambulance to finish the transport.

In a written statement, the Office of the Presidency said, "When the ambulance experienced engine problems it was decided that it would be best to transfer to another military ambulance which itself was accompanied for the rest of the journey by a civilian ambulance."

Mandela was rushed to the hospital in the early morning hours of June 8, after his health deteriorated rapidly from a recurring lung infection.

Government officials insist the former president's health was not compromised while he waited for the second ambulance.

"The fully equipped military ICU ambulance had a full complement of specialist medical staff including intensive care specialists and ICU nurses," according to the written statement. "The convoy also included two quick response vehicles."

The anti-apartheid leader remains in serious, but stable condition.

Former South African president Thabo Mbeki is the latest to suggest that Mandela is getting better.
After speaking to Mandela's doctors, Mbeki told a South African radio station, "Nelson Mandela is improving in terms of his health. I don't think anyone should entertain some sort of wrong notion that Nelson Mandela is about to die tomorrow. He's not going to."

Earlier this week, Mandela's daughter Zenani Mandela-Dlamini told a crowd of reporters outside Mediclinic Heart Hospital her father "is doing very well." President Jacob Zuma has also said publicly Mandela's health is "improving."

But government officials say doctors have not indicated when Mandela may be released from the hospital.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Sunday
Jun092013

Nelson Mandela Spends Second Night in Hospital

Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- Nelson Mandela, the former president of South Africa, spent a second night in the hospital battling a lung infection on Saturday.

On Saturday, South Africa officials said Mandela was in "serious but stable condition" with his family by his side.

As of Sunday morning, officials have not released any updates on Mandela's condition.

The 94-year-old Nobel Peace prize winner's "condition deteriorated and he was transferred to a Pretoria hospital," early Saturday morning, according to a statement from the office of South African President Jacob Zuma.

"The former President is receiving expert medical care and doctors are doing everything possible to make him better and comfortable," the statement said. "President Jacob Zuma, on behalf of government and the nation, wishes Madiba [Mandela's clan nickname] a speedy recovery and requests the media and the public to respect the privacy of Madiba and his family."

In April, Mandela spent 18 days in the hospital due to a lung infection and was treated for gall stones in December 2012.

Families throughout South Africa prayed for Mandela's recovery as they attended church services on Sunday.

Mandela served as the first black president of South Africa from 1994 to 1999.

In 1993, he received a Nobel Peace Prize for his work in ending apartheid through non-violent means.

Mandela had been ill for some days before being taken to a Pretoria hospital early Saturday.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Jun082013

Nelson Mandela Hospitalized with Lung Infection

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images(PRETORIA, South Africa) -- Nelson Mandela, the former president of South Africa, is in "serious but stable condition" after contracting a lung infection, South Africa officials said.

The 94-year-old Nobel Peace prize winner's "condition deteriorated and he was transferred to a Pretoria hospital," early Saturday morning according to statement from the office of South African President Jacob Zuma.

"The former President is receiving expert medical care and doctors are doing everything possible to make him better and comfortable," the statement said. "President Jacob Zuma, on behalf of government and the nation, wishes Madiba a speedy recovery and requests the media and the public to respect the privacy of Madiba and his family," Zuma said, referring to Mandela by his clan name.

Mandela spent 18 days in April in the hospital due to a lung infection and was treated for gall stones in December 2012.

Mandela served as the first black president of South Africa from 1994 to 1999.

In 1993, he received a Nobel Peace Prize for his work in ending apartheid through non-violent means.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Apr062013

Mandela Discharged from Hospital

Leon Neal/AFP/Getty Images(JOHANNESBURG) -- Former South African President Nelson Mandela was discharged from the hospital on Saturday following a sustained and gradual improvement in his condition, according to a release from President Jacob Zuma.

Mandela was in the hospital for ten days while being treated for pneumonia. Mandela has a history of lung problems, and this was his third health scare in four months.

He has returned to his house, where he will now receive home based high care.

In a statement, Zuma thanked the hard working medical team and hospital staff for looking after Mandela so efficiently.

Zuma also extended his gratitude to all those who gave their support.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio