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Entries in Roman Catholic (4)

Saturday
Feb162013

Catholics Could Have New Pope by Palm Sunday

L'Osservatore Romano Vatican Pool via Getty Images(ROME) -- The conclave to elect a new pope might begin sooner than expected, the Vatican said on Saturday, meaning Roman Catholics could have a new pontiff well before Easter.

“This time and situation is a bit different from last time,” Father Federico Lombardi said.

Church rules say a conclave must begin 15 to 20 days after the seat becomes vacant after a period of mourning.  This time there’s no need to mourn; because the vacancy is not because of the pope’s death, but because Benedict is resigning as of Feb. 28, the cardinals may have room to accelerate the schedule.

Speeding up the process could potentially give the Church a new pope in time for Holy Week, the most important days of the church calendar.  He could be formally installed at the Vatican in time to celebrate Palm Sunday, March 24; Good Friday, March 29; and Easter, March 31.  Cardinals would also be able to return to their archdiocese to celebrate Holy Week with their communities.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Saturday
Feb182012

22 New Cardinals Created at Ceremony in Rome

Franco Origlia/Getty Images(ROME) -- Pope Benedict XVI appointed 22 new cardinals in a ceremony on Saturday at St Peter's Basilica in Rome.

The cardinals join an elite group of members who are the pope's closest aides and also choose the Roman Catholic leader's successor. The 84-year-old pontiff presented the cardinals with red hats and gold rings during the ceremony which is called the Consistory

New York's Archbishop Timothy Dolan and Baltimore's Archbishop Edwin O'Brien from the United States as well as Archbishop Thomas Collins from Toronto were among the appointed cardinals.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Friday
Jan132012

German Catholic Priest Admits to Sexually Abusing Three Boys

Hemera/Thi​nkstock(BRAUNSCHWEIG, Germany) -- A German Catholic priest admitted to 280 counts of sexual abuse on three boys in court on Thursday.

The BBC News reports that the priest, who was only identified as Andreas L, abused a nine-year-old boy for two years after he had befriended the boy's widowed mother in 2004. The abuse is said to have occurred for two years when the boy would accompany the priest on weekend trips. The boy's mother became suspicious of the relationship and approached the diocese of Hildesheim which forbade the priest to contact the boy. When he attempted to contact the victim, now aged 17, the teen revealed the abuse resulting in the arrest of the priest last summer.

Andreas L. began abusing two brothers aged nine and 13 shortly after he ceased contact with the first victim.

He appeared in Braunschweig court on Thursday and when questioned, the priest said he was under the impression that the children consented. If convicted, he faces a minimum prison sentence of six years.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Sunday
May012011

Pope Benedict Beatifies Pope John Paul II at Vatican Ceremony

JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images(ROME) -- Pope Benedict XVI beatified Pope John Paul II Sunday at St. Peter's Square before an estimated one million people, declaring the Polish-born pope to be "Blessed" and putting him one step closer to sainthood.

Among the faithful was a French nun, Sister Marie Simon-Pierre, who says she was cured of Parkinson's disease after praying to the pope only months after his death from complications of the same disease. The Vatican certified Sister Pierre's cure as a "miracle" and advanced John Paul's cause. Beatification is defined as one being "blessed," and is the first step in the process of being declared a saint by the Church. A second miracle tied to John Paul is needed before his canonization.

Posters honoring John Paul's life were put up all over Rome ahead of the ceremony. Large television screens showing images of Pope John Paul II were erected along the Via della Conciliazione, the Roman street that leads to St. Peter's Basilica.

Ahead of the ceremonies, the pope's coffin was carried from its resting place in the Vatican crypt beneath St. Peter's and placed before St. Peter's tomb where pilgrims filed past to pay their respects. A vial of John Paul's blood, taken during the last days before his death, was also put on display.

As pope, John Paul II beatified more people than the total of all other popes since the 15th century reign of Pope Sixtus VI, leading some critics to speculate that he was rapidly pushed to sainthood.

Joe Lynaugh of the Catholic movement, Call to Action, opposes John Paul II's potential canonization.

"This will just go down as another disappointment from a church that is unfortunately filled with disappointments these days," Lynaugh told ABC News. "Sainthood, maybe, but let's decide a couple hundred years from now. I'd settle with 10."

Father Thomas Williams, a Catholic priest and professor at the Regina Apostolorum Pontifical Athenaeum in Rome, disagrees.

"This was a response to a grassroots petition rather than a top-down decision," he said. "There was public clamor for Pope John Paul II to be recognized as a saint as soon as he died. The Church merely acceded to the wishes of the faithful. The process began quickly but there were no shortcuts taken in the process itself.”

The Vatican said at least 21 heads of state and 87 official delegations from around the world attended the ceremony, including presidents Giorgio Napolitano of Italy, Bronislaw Komorowski of Poland and Felipe Calderon of Mexico.

Copyright 2011 ABC News Radio







ABC News Radio